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In Honor Of Dr. King

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posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 01:50 PM
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Dr. Martin Luther King. In the USA, today is dedicated to his honor.
The man almost single handedly changed the way people of color were treated.
Do I respect him. ABSOLUTELY.
He had a dream. A WONDERFUL dream. One that I see realized with my own son.




I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor's lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers.



My son lives this dream, and it is beautiful.

Although hateful venom was spouted at him at every turn in the road, Dr. King never preached hatred. He NEVER advocated violence. He put himself in harms way more times than most of us ever will. He died for his beliefs.

Dr. King. I respectfully salute you Sir.




posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 02:03 PM
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That is some AWESOME thinking and stuff you have been doing today.
I wish here in Canada we did the same thing.
Regardless of the border between us,I agree he was a great man...

Read the Words of Maya Angelou,Poet author,and friend of Dr.King at the height of the civil rights movement..here..
www.achievement.org...
Enjoy,
AD



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 02:10 PM
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It's an honorable thread for an honorable man Lombozo, but the reality is that MLKJ actually created more racial discord in this country, just as the equal opportunity laws do today. Then you add on top of that that 'they' whacked him and blamed it on some Southern redneck characature, well that just added to the divide.

The plan was carefully conceived and carried out. MLKJ was being used as a tool.

Still, RIP to the man!


Peace



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by Dr Love
 


Hey Doc. I must respectfully disagree with you. You say he created more racial discord? I do understand where you're coming from, BUT I disagree. He made people more aware - ALL people more aware of the attrocities which were committed. Where it was commonplace to call a black man N-word, or Boy. Where shameless murders were committed, and officials looked the other way. Where a black man couldn't sit and drink a cup of coffee in a 'whites only' diner, even though his money was minted from the exact same place as his white counter parts.
He gave an entire people the courage to stand up with one common voice and proclaim equality. And he did it with peaceful marches, and speeches.

The equal opportunity laws of today need to be revamped. They do, that I agree with you on.
I am ashamed for those in the spotlight of the black community who jump on every cause they seem fit to keep their own names in the headlines, the entire time riding the good Doctors coat tails.



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 02:29 PM
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Respect for this my friend and unlimited respect to MLK.
May his sentiments live on.



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by lombozo
 


Fair enough. I'm certainly not trying to trample on the man's legacy that's for sure, just trying to add another perspective.

I will say this though, Malcolm X, after he had his re-reawakening, would have done much more for racial harmony. He was whacked super-quick "by his own people".

Peace



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 02:43 PM
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Mucho respect for MLK, he was a good guy.



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 03:05 PM
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yeah mlk was the best. one thing i've always wanted to know though is why malcolm never got as much respect. and i don't wanna hear because he was to militant. that's a lame ass excuse.



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by LordInfamous
 


I'm ashamed to admit, that I can't really answer your question.
Is it due to the fact that he was perceived as being militant? Perhaps.
Might I ask you the same question? What are your views on it?



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 03:47 PM
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probably because it always seemed like he viewed the ENTIRE white race as the enemy, instead of the majority of the scumbags that were actually racist.



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by LordInfamous
probably because it always seemed like he viewed the ENTIRE white race as the enemy


The deception lies in the fact that his views changed after his pilgramage to Mecca. Once his views changed to one of more logical racial harmony, he became an immediate danger. Post-pilgramage, Malcolm X saw the future which was being created for African-Americans, and he vehemently disagreed with it.

His "militant" image was the one that the PTB wanted to keep.

The above is my opinion.

Peace



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 05:53 PM
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Originally posted by LordInfamous
yeah mlk was the best. one thing i've always wanted to know though is why malcolm never got as much respect. and i don't wanna hear because he was to militant. that's a lame ass excuse.


Why? Same then, same now. I'm listening to BO right now on the radio from Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta from yesterday. History.

"A Letter From The Birmingham Jail" seems appropriate but The King Center site is offline today. Here's a UPENN link. Taking the time to read it and think about today. History.

The full version of the "I have a dream" speech.


Why LI? Exactly.

Vic


[edit on 21-1-2008 by V Kaminski]



posted on Jan, 21 2008 @ 10:29 PM
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Thanks, lombozo, for this thread.
His "I Have Seen the Mountaintop" speech brings me to tears.
His anti-war stance and his urge to non-violent collective action made him feared by those in power.



posted on Jan, 22 2008 @ 12:21 AM
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Mr. King has been my hero ever since I was a kid and looked him up on a computer based encyclopedia and heard his "I have a Dream Speech". At that age I thought he was still alive and was working at that moment. I wanted to go out and help him, if he'd take a white kid like me.
Sounds odd, but he's the only hero I have who I don't research, mainly because I don't want to find out something bad about him, y'know?



posted on Jan, 22 2008 @ 09:12 AM
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Rune, I enjoyed reading your post. You sound like a good person.


The words of Dr. King certainly inspire us, giving hope to those that would make the world a better place, but making fearful those who do not want to change the world for the better of their fellow man.

Remember, Life around us and in us can be filled with sufferings of all kinds. Life is not perfect, and neither is any Person. Our heroes are not perfect, but their heroism is in asking us to join them to make ourselves and the world a better place.

If you do look into the personal life of a hero, you will see human failings of a personal nature. This can be unsettling but should remind us of the good each of us can do despite the sufferings we carry inside.



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