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Questions about secret societies/this board

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posted on Sep, 4 2007 @ 06:14 PM
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1. I am from Louisiana and sometimes I view the Mardi Gras Krewes in our state as secret societies which are keeping terrible secrets and kill people if they turn on them or threaten to give up secret information to non-members and I was wondering if anyone else has considered Mardi Gras Krewes as secret societies like the Masons which may be behind a conspiracy of some kind.

2. Why are there so many real Masons in here? It's like if Department of Defense officials posted in here when you're talking about aliens and secret army bases and stuff, I'm sure you wouldn't think of them the same way and talk to them like they would actually divulge information that answers your questions accusing them of keeping secrets from the public. Basically I'm saying why would anybody think it's not just a bunch of misinformation if they're paranoid enough to post on a conspiracy theory message board.




posted on Sep, 4 2007 @ 06:51 PM
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you have a good point regarding #2, however the analogy is not accurate. Almost any male can become a Mason - the requirements are not very strict, and it doesn't take long. To join the military / become a civilian contractor with a Top Secret clearance, plus access and knowledge of actual conspiracy-related projects, is much harder, and i would guess not very many, especially compared to how many Masons there are out there.

It wouldn't surprise me at all if there were a few posters here, working on top secret military projects. #, I've worked on a few myself, but nothing that would even be mildly interesting to anyone other than a total avionics nerd.




I'm sure you wouldn't think of them the same way and talk to them like they would actually divulge information that answers your questions accusing them of keeping secrets from the public.


ah, but that's a double edged sword. On one hand, you can't believe anything non-masons say about masonry, because there's no real way to tell if they are making it up or not - the only way to be informed of masonry is by becoming a mason, and developing upon knowledge with independent study, and masonic discussions, etc.

On the other hand, a mason may not give the whole story, or even give false stories - although the good, masonic thing to do is not deny or lie about things, yet simply leave it at an ambiguous statement. Luckily, on this board there are some masons that are very knowledgeable in their craft.

It would help to think of it the same as a religious discussion (but don't think I'm comparing Masonry to religion! gasp!). While there will be atheists spouting one thing, and the fundamentals spouting the polar opposite - they will both present good points, and it all must be taken with a grain of salt, realizing it's not the religion that is making the person lie, but a character trait of that person.

The same could be said for masons, and non-masons, and anti-masons.

plus, I'm guessing the DoD has a much tighter leash on it's people - especially when it comes to monitoring internet traffic and the like.



posted on Sep, 4 2007 @ 07:38 PM
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Green_57:

If you have any interesting background or stories about Mardi Gras Krewes, I'd love to hear them. Old New Orleans families certainly have their share of secrets and scandals, and often have links to black magic and the occult.



posted on Sep, 6 2007 @ 10:59 PM
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you have a good point regarding #2, however the analogy is not accurate.


Yeah, I was just trying to make an analogy that would make sense, but I usually exaggerate them for effect.




While there will be atheists spouting one thing, and the fundamentals spouting the polar opposite - they will both present good points, and it all must be taken with a grain of salt, realizing it's not the religion that is making the person lie, but a character trait of that person.


Yeah I don't believe what anybody says on either side on this or any other message board about news/current events so I always take it with a grain of salt for sure.




If you have any interesting background or stories about Mardi Gras Krewes, I'd love to hear them. Old New Orleans families certainly have their share of secrets and scandals, and often have links to black magic and the occult.


No, unfortunately I don't have any first hand or second-hand accounts of any Mardi Gras Krewe conspiracy stories, I have just always been suspicious of them because they are pretty much "secret societies" and they remind me of Druids and the people from Eyes Wide Shut. I was just asking if anybody else had heard anything or talked about it on the board before.



posted on Sep, 7 2007 @ 11:29 PM
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Comus Krewe: Founded in 1857, the Krewe of Comus (from the Greek komos, meaning "revelers"), has the distinction of having originally been the oldest parading Krewe and was initially named "The Mystick Krewe of Comus." Founded by six men (all Protestant white Americans) who had moved to New Orleans from Mobile, Alabama, they formed a secret society along with thirteen New Orleanians and mounted a tableau ball for 3,000 people at the Gaiety Theatre. Comus

Babylon Krewe: This Krewe was begun by a New Orleans dentist in 1939. It is one of the ten oldest parading Krewes in the City of New Orleans, its membership consisting chiefly of prominent business men and women from around the country, many of whom are physicians. Secrecy is of great significance to this Krewe and the identity of their King is never released to the general public.

The Carnival Memphis Association organizes, plans, budgets, and promotes the King, Queen, and Royal Court, as well as many of the events staged during Carnival week. However, the Grand Krewes (once known as secret societies) also stage their own festivities throughout the year, elect their own royalty, manage their own budget, and have their own membership requirements. Most of these organizations bear Egyptian names in accordance to tradition originally set out by the Mystic Memphi, and in conjunction with Memphis being the sister city of ancient Memphis, Egypt. The twelve Grand Krewes that Carnival Memphis recognizes are the Mystic Society of the Memphi, Osiris, Sphinx, RaMet, Ennead, Phoenix, Aani, Ptolemy, Kemet Jubilee, Ptah, Luxor, Queen Bees. The Secret Order of the Boll Weevils is a support group of Carnival that is not a Grand Krewe. The Grand Krewes of Memphi, Osiris, RaMet and Sphinx are “old-line” Grand Krewes and were all started in the 1930’s as the original secret societies of the Memphis Cotton Carnival. However, Memphi considers its history traceable to the 1870’s as the original promoters of the Memphis Mardi Gras, although it became defunct during the time that span between the last Mardi Gras and its restoration as a Cotton Carnival secret society. Membership requirements and financial commitments are normally more complex when one wishes to join one of the older krewes, as compared to the newer krewes, that may have little or no membership process. Memphi and Osiris are all-male organizations, with some exceptions. Memphi allows their past queens to become members after their reign, following their belief that “once a Queen, always a Queen!.”

I have seen a lot of pages mentioning how these e or have been called secret societies

Another interesting link;
Untold story of the founding of Comus

Even saw this quote on IvyGate "YV = YV krewe , each new set of taps is a new "krewe' for sphinx, like mardi gras krewes"
Linky

Disinformation is still information. It's all in how one reads it.



posted on Sep, 7 2007 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by Green_57
 


I do have a Mardi Gras Krewe story that sends shivers up and down the spine, but it takes place in Galveston, Texas in 1900.

That year all of the Mardi Gras festivities were dedicated to "Beelzebub and His Devils" with the great parade of the devils marching right in front of St. Mary's Cathedral.

Come September 8th (Feast of the Birthday of the Virgin Mary), Galveston was detroyed by the 1900 Storm, killing over 6,000 people -- but not destroying St. Mary's Cathedral.



[edit on 7/9/07 by Pellevoisin]



posted on Sep, 9 2007 @ 04:19 AM
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As far as real masons being here, I believe masons enjoy and help promote outlandish masonic conspiracy theories. If people knew what really went on in masonic lodges, they would find masonry boring and they would probably not want to join up. Since many people have outlandish beliefs about what could be going on inside a masonic lodge, what goes on inside a lodge becomes interesting to these people. These people are more likely to join masonry to find out what is really going on, or at the very least have some sort of deference for masons because they may feel masons have "magic" powers or influence.



posted on Sep, 13 2007 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by hotpinkurinalmint
As far as real masons being here, I believe masons enjoy and help promote outlandish masonic conspiracy theories. If people knew what really went on in masonic lodges, they would find masonry boring and they would probably not want to join up. Since many people have outlandish beliefs about what could be going on inside a masonic lodge, what goes on inside a lodge becomes interesting to these people. These people are more likely to join masonry to find out what is really going on, or at the very least have some sort of deference for masons because they may feel masons have "magic" powers or influence.


i feel thats a very valid and accurate analysis, although obviously not true for all.

also, this info on the Krewe is fascinating, thanks for posting.



posted on Sep, 15 2007 @ 03:34 PM
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I think in the many books it is admitted there is not much to see in the lodge.
It's after hours when we levitate tables and influence leaders and well of course large sum owners of stocks. Know no more speculation or we shall open our pineal glands in full force



Originally posted by hotpinkurinalmint
As far as real masons being here, I believe masons enjoy and help promote outlandish masonic conspiracy theories. If people knew what really went on in masonic lodges, they would find masonry boring and they would probably not want to join up. Since many people have outlandish beliefs about what could be going on inside a masonic lodge, what goes on inside a lodge becomes interesting to these people. These people are more likely to join masonry to find out what is really going on, or at the very least have some sort of deference for masons because they may feel masons have "magic" powers or influence.



posted on Sep, 17 2007 @ 08:26 AM
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Originally posted by diedagaincraftsmen
I think in the many books it is admitted there is not much to see in the lodge.


Which presents a major problem in membership retainage.

Generally, a man receives the degrees, and is profoundly inspired by the pageantry, dignity, and mysticism of the rites. After receiving the degree of Master Mason, he hurries to the Lodge to witness his first regular communication.

Instead of elaborating on the ordeals of initiation in which he has just passed, and which has inspired him to attend to this meeting, he sits for 2 hours listening to everybody bitch and moan about Lodge finances, arguments over what will be served at next month's picnic, debates over whether the parking lot should be repaved, etc.

Before long, he stops showing up at all.

Obviously, this should not be. There is absolutely no reason that we can not make our meetings interesting and entertaining. Many Lodges are now making changes, and doing exactly that. I applaud them for it. They are focusing on Masonic education, and keeping the boring stuff to a bare minimum.

For those Lodges that continue having long, drawn out meetings where nothing gets done but a few long-winded arguments over money, I don't see a very distinguished future for them.



posted on Sep, 17 2007 @ 09:07 AM
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Originally posted by hotpinkurinalmint
As far as real masons being here, I believe masons enjoy and help promote outlandish masonic conspiracy theories.


You nailed it. When I was active I saw this going on all of the time. While it could occasionally be good for a few laughs inside the Lodge, it most certainly caused us, as an organization, to lose public credibility outside of it.

I do not doubt that many Freemasons were involved in various "conspiracies" when the craft was at the height of power, but the last 100 years or so have seen a sharp decline in both membership and influence. This would naturally limit their ability to conspire or embark on some malevolent agenda.

Right now, it seems, they have their hands full trying to retain enough members to keep the craft from dying.



posted on Sep, 17 2007 @ 11:19 AM
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Cool I'm gonna try to read that Comus thing cause I know who they are and I'm sure it's gonna be good because I saw something about Abraham Lincoln on there.



posted on May, 27 2008 @ 05:13 AM
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there are alot of people in this world with mild paranoia. some have it worse than others. who gives a # if something is hidden from the rest of the society. apparently it is for the best, because i would rather not know than know. that leaves me with less information i have to give or receive.



posted on May, 27 2008 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by Masonic Light
 


Agreed .. sometimes it seems we have meetings just for the sake of going through the ritual of opening lodge. lol. I can obviously understand how some people are disenchanted with Masonry because of this. Truly if someone where to explain Masonry to an outsider, you could tell them how it is, what to expect.. and they would run away from you. Adding a bit of mystery and conspiracy does make Masonry more enticing, but will not ensure members stay.

Ah.. if only we really where plotting to rule the world! Then every able male would be a Mason lol.

To the OP:

Masons are allowed here because it is the "other side" to the story. Masons on ATS quite often debunk misconceptions, sometimes people who present these misconceptions accept that much, and some insist they are right. The objective to outsiders like your self is to view both sides of the argument, and using the resources you have and the information provided, come to the conclusion on who you believe. If you even believe any one. In the end your own research may prove more convincing, if however you research both sides. But you shouldn't be against Freemasons discussing the Craft on ATS, if we where not here there would only be one side to the argument, and honestly, how fun would that be if all the responses where "mmm yup thats right uh huh, evil masons!" .. a little debate never hurt no one.



posted on May, 27 2008 @ 09:43 PM
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Originally posted by hotpinkurinalmint
As far as real masons being here, I believe masons enjoy and help promote outlandish masonic conspiracy theories.


Dude, I must disagree. On this board, at least, the exact opposite is true!!

Seriously, I must be missing something here... Can you find an example for us???



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 12:55 AM
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Is The Mystic Krewe of Comus apart of the Knights of Columbus otherwise known as the Klansmen?



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