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Gravity Wave??

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posted on Jun, 3 2007 @ 11:35 AM
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I've not seen this discussed before - apologies if it has.

Also a bit unsure what forum to put it under - so its here.


The vid clip is a time lapse and apparently shows a 'gravity wave'.

Weather it is or not its defiantly trippy.

Is this just some sort of metrological phenomena or actually gravity waves? What would cause them? Is it possible for us to feel them?

Or am I just being a mug and it’s faked!




posted on Jun, 3 2007 @ 11:42 AM
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I don't know what phenomenon that is, probably fairly normal, but no idea really. A gravity wave, as much as I understand it, is a near light speed small compression of spacetime itself. I think.

[edit on 3-6-2007 by apex]



posted on Jun, 3 2007 @ 11:45 AM
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Yes that was discussed last month, sorry I do not have the link
its very much like ocean waves if I am not mistaken



posted on Jun, 3 2007 @ 11:51 AM
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Found this PDF

Heavy reading, but seems to suggest they are gravity waves.

Even gives a table showing wavelengths and amplitude etc.


Its all a bit over my head, but i'll give it a bash



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 06:50 AM
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If the Gravity waves were affecting clouds THAT much, the camera would have been affected. Objects, people, trees, etc too. You would see a wave on the ground. IF it had been smaller, maybe not...but that is to big to just not touch the ground.



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 08:42 AM
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Originally posted by Foxe
If the Gravity waves were affecting clouds THAT much,


Clouds are vapour; we experience wind all the time. Is it possible that this is just the mundane caught on film?

[edit on 4/6/2007 by Now_Then]



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 08:45 AM
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you know google is an amazing device
try this
type in gravity wave
hit search
and voila

In fluid dynamics, gravity waves are waves generated in a fluid medium or at the interface between two mediums (e.g. the atmosphere or ocean) which has the restoring force of gravity or buoyancy.

en.wikipedia.org...



[edit on 4-6-2007 by junglelord]



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 08:46 AM
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Again, not an expert - although being in England I know a thing or two about cloudiness - but that looks to me like warm air rising and pushing stuff out of the way. If you think about it, hot and cold air push clouds into all sorts of crazy shapes - like tornadoes, for example!

Never heard of clouds being tidal before, though, I must say....



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 08:52 AM
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Originally posted by junglelord
you know google is an amazing device
try this
type in gravity wave
hit search
and voila
[edit on 4-6-2007 by junglelord]


How do you think I came across this PDF? (which I'm still reading)


Also Wiki is great, but I wouldn't put too much faith in it.

[edit on 4/6/2007 by Now_Then]



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 08:55 AM
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wiki is fine, its not a encylopedia of fake information.
their gravity wave article is fine.
Could you point out something incorrect?



[edit on 4-6-2007 by junglelord]



posted on Jun, 4 2007 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by junglelord
wiki is fine, its not a encylopedia of fake information.
their gravity wave article is fine.
Could you point out something incorrect?
[edit on 4-6-2007 by junglelord]


Its not my area - I have few areas



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 12:22 AM
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The name is a misnomer, but it's actually a fairly common cloud phenomina. They're atmospheric oscillations created by the movement of air. Land shape is one of the causes of the waves... I've seen several beautiful ones over a section of rolling hills in the Hill country of Texas.

Berkeley is one of the places studying this:
sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu...

The wikipedia article isn't entirely correct, but the pictures are nice.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 5 2007 @ 12:25 AM
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whats incorrect about it byrd?





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