If stabbed

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posted on Mar, 17 2007 @ 09:19 PM
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Is it best to kepp the object you were stabbed with inside of you? To prevent bleeding until at hospital.




posted on Mar, 17 2007 @ 09:40 PM
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yes, you could bleed out if the knife is sealing the blood vessel and you pull it out. So if you are stabbed at the moment, dont pull it out.



posted on Mar, 17 2007 @ 09:52 PM
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what if they stab you and pull it out?



posted on Mar, 17 2007 @ 10:24 PM
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use direct pressure on the wound but obviously you need to escape the assault first, but maybe the first is to try not to get stabbed . if you let a knife wielding assailant within 21 feet of you your too close, so you either fight or flee before that point.



posted on Mar, 18 2007 @ 04:14 PM
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The shock of being stabbed in addition to it's location, it is very probable that you would die quickly. Best bet is minimizing your wounds with your arms and hands. Don't allow a body stab if possible.



posted on Mar, 18 2007 @ 04:25 PM
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I did a quick check and found some basic First Aid instruction on Wikipedia.
If I really needed anything more than the basic information given HERE
I would probably do a more thorough "google search".

I hope that none of us ever has to use this information.



posted on Apr, 3 2007 @ 02:35 PM
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If something is embedded in your skin, whether it is something as serious as a knife or arrow, or something as seemingly small as a shard of glass, you should always leave it in.

I have heard a story about someone that had a picture frame break and a piece of glass got stuck in their arm. They wanted to go to the hospital to get it taken out properly by a doctor in case it was in an artery or something. Their friend thought they were nuts, because it looked like it had hardly gone into the skin and it would be faster and easier to just pull it out themselves. But sure enough when they got to the hospital and the doctor pulled it out, it started gushing blood so fast that they had trouble stopping it and it had to be cauterized.

So the moral is leave the object in. Just try not to look at it or touch it, or you will probably get freaked out and go into shock.

There are special "O-Ring" bandages that are for fractures where bone breaks the surface of the skin, embedded objects, etc. You should have some in your first aid kit and build them up around the object in your skin, so that nothing can hit it and either drive it in deeper, or pull it out and start massive bleeding.



posted on Apr, 3 2007 @ 03:19 PM
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Could there be anything that could be inprovised to seal a stab wound to prevent shock-inducing blood-loss?
I've heard of clingfilm/plastic bags being used to seal up chest/lung wounds to prevent the lungs from collapsing...would duct-tape or superglue or any kind of say hardware store sealant work in such a case of a serious stab injury?



posted on Apr, 3 2007 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
Could there be anything that could be inprovised to seal a stab wound to prevent shock-inducing blood-loss?
I've heard of clingfilm/plastic bags being used to seal up chest/lung wounds to prevent the lungs from collapsing...would duct-tape or superglue or any kind of say hardware store sealant work in such a case of a serious stab injury?


Using clingfilm is most likely use when you have a breathing wound. (Let me explain) A Breathing wound is when the lung has been punched at time of stabbing and air goes through the wound. It's looks like that the wound is breathing or doing bubbles when bleeding.) You use Clingfilm as a valve. Air from inside is going out but no air is coming in. This is to avoid Pneumothorax. But if the wound is not breathing, direct pressure and a 4 way bandage (Bandage is sealed on the 4 corners) is the best to protect the wound. No use of industrial stuff will be helping. Actually it's maybe not bleeding outside but the inside damage could be worst and have an internal bleeding that could cause death if not threat by Surgeon.

Hope that's help



posted on Apr, 3 2007 @ 05:15 PM
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also, in general any stab that is 2" or deeper will be fatal from blood loss.

They say that a knife wound can be much worse than a low caliber bullet due to more internal organs going into shock from the bigger wound channel.



posted on Apr, 3 2007 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by BASSPLYR
also, in general any stab that is 2" or deeper will be fatal from blood loss.

They say that a knife wound can be much worse than a low caliber bullet due to more internal organs going into shock from the bigger wound channel.


Bullets have normally a straight linear trajectory ( I said normally if their is no obstacle on the way like ribs, skull or anything hard...) Knifes wounds are not ``Clean wounds`` the path is erratic and it's not a hole it's more like a unclean cut.



posted on Apr, 3 2007 @ 10:43 PM
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Could there be any instance in which it might be better to remove the instrument with which you are stabbed??

I'm thinking if you might be stabbed and need to run or walk somewhere for help, but you are stabbed in such a way that the movement of your body causes the blade to cause even more damage (ripping/tearing you from the inside).

Possible?..



posted on Apr, 4 2007 @ 05:34 AM
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anythings possible you see some pretty wild things in ems people impaled on rebar, fence posts, pipes and who know what there was even a famous case where a guy got a knife stuck straight through the top of his head and into hid sinus, but all these people got professional care in the field and after. if your stabbed with no assistance available and no follow up care you may just be faced with pulling the knife/ whatever out and treating the bleeding and infection your self and all i can say is i wish you well because it's not going to be pretty.



posted on Apr, 4 2007 @ 09:55 AM
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Originally posted by Valombre
Using clingfilm is most likely use when you have a breathing wound. (Let me explain) A Breathing wound is when the lung has been punched at time of stabbing and air goes through the wound. It's looks like that the wound is breathing or doing bubbles when bleeding.) You use Clingfilm as a valve. Air from inside is going out but no air is coming in. This is to avoid Pneumothorax. But if the wound is not breathing, direct pressure and a 4 way bandage (Bandage is sealed on the 4 corners) is the best to protect the wound.

Hope that's help


I always heard that with chest wounds, especially involving the lungs, you are only supposed to tape down 3 sides and leave the bottom side/flap open.



posted on Apr, 4 2007 @ 01:31 PM
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With a chest wound, the main issue is the size of the wound. As a general rule a tension pneumothorax will occur if the wound is more than two thirds the diameter of the trachea. This is because the pressure difference causes air to be sucked in through the wound when the victim inspires, where it builds up in the pleural space (between the lung and the outer chest wall). The wound then snaps closed as they expire, trapping the air.

As the amount of air builds up, there is less room for the lung which subsequently collapses. Eventually pressure builds on the heart usually causing failure.

By placing a piece of plastic over the wound, sealed on 3 sides, you create what is known as a "3-sided flutter valve". This allows the air to ecape, while stopping more air entering the wound. A commercial version of this is available, called an Asherman Chest Seal. Less sexy objects have been used in the past, the classic being a credit card!

Bear in mind that the wound can be anywhere in the chest cavity, including the back and shoulders.

As for knife wounds, leave the blade in while building a ring of dressings AROUND the object for protection. The blade is often the only thing holding blood in. Also, by removing the blade, you may increase the size of the internal wound cavity. If the nife has been removed, loads of direct pressure and swift emergency help is required.



posted on Apr, 5 2007 @ 06:55 AM
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if sucking chest wounds ( any chest wound would suck ) are a concern to you google asherman chest seal it's the standard in ems for treatment of this injury.



posted on Apr, 5 2007 @ 08:21 AM
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Originally posted by Zhenyghi
Could there be any instance in which it might be better to remove the instrument with which you are stabbed??

I'm thinking if you might be stabbed and need to run or walk somewhere for help, but you are stabbed in such a way that the movement of your body causes the blade to cause even more damage (ripping/tearing you from the inside).

Possible?..


The only way you remove the object is when you are not able to stabilize the patient or if the object is in the chest and you are not able to do CPR in a Cardiac arrest.



posted on Apr, 5 2007 @ 08:28 AM
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Originally posted by wcssar
if sucking chest wounds ( any chest wound would suck ) are a concern to you google asherman chest seal it's the standard in ems for treatment of this injury.


Asherman chest seal is the best for all kind of chest wounds it's largely use
by the EMS. Actually Asherman is pretty expensive and some EMS services in Canada are not using it. Actually if done well a 3-sided flutter valve is normally working well and do the same job than the Asherman.



posted on Apr, 5 2007 @ 08:30 AM
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I was stabbed twice by a guy when I was in the Navy. He caught me by surprise, and stuck a butterfly knife in my stomach and in my neck. Fortunately, I was close to a hospital and a medic was close, but in 20 minutes I lost 6 pints of blood, even though no major arteries were hit. The medic applied pressure, but that only slowed the bleeding. I made it through, but only because it wasn't my time to go yet. That's my feeling about it.
Then there's infection.....



posted on Apr, 5 2007 @ 08:37 AM
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Originally posted by Valombre
Actually if done well a 3-sided flutter valve is normally working well and do the same job than the Asherman.


That's right and it's easy to do. Here's some basic instructions from the web.


www.brooksidepres... s.org/

The most serious chest wound that requires immediate first aid is a sucking chest wound (Open Pneumothorax). This is a penetrating injury that makes a hole in the chest cavity, causing the lung to collapse, which prevents normal breathing. This condition is a medical emergency that will result in death if not treated quickly. Signs and symptoms of a sucking chest wound include:

1. Difficulty breathing and sharp chest pain.

2. Bluish skin color and anxiety.

If the casualty has a sucking chest wound, do the following:

1. Immediately seal the wound with your hand or any airtight (I.D. Card) material available. The material must be large enough so that it will not be sucked into the wound when the casualty breaths.

2. Firmly tape the material in place with adhesive tape leaving one corner untaped to prevent a pressure buildup. The purpose of the dressing is to keep air from going in through the wound. If the casualty's condition deteriorates, remove the seal immediately.

3. Lay the casualty on his or her affected side.

4. Treat for shock - Place the casualty in a semi-sitting position, to help them breath easier.

5. Do not give the casualty anything to eat or drink. If the casualty complains of thirst, wet his or her lips with a wet towel.

6. Request medical assistance immediately.



[edit on 5/4/2007 by SportyMB]





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