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Giant lint rollers to collect dangerous Moon dust

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posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:00 PM
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Sounds reasonable, but why cant I see any dust on the landing gear?
Is there a better picture somewhere? Is there a photo of a dusty moonboot or something I can look at?

[edit on 9-3-2007 by 11Bravo]




posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:02 PM
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Exactly. The point I was trying to make is that they have irradiated moon soil in the capsule not on purpose but by accident. This is why they wanted to create an airlock with those rollers in order to remove the irradiated moon dust. Ever go to the beach, you're bound to find sand in your shorts even after you washed them!



posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:09 PM
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Originally posted by 11Bravo
Sounds reasonable, but why cant I see any dust on the landing gear?
Is there a better picture somewhere? Is there a photo of a dusty moonboot or something I can look at?
[edit on 9-3-2007 by 11Bravo]



This is about the best picture I can find of the dust. I am not sure where I have seen it before but there are some good photos that show how filthy their suits were when they came back from the moonwalk. The dust would be about the consistency of talcum powder and would be all over everything and in the air.

edit to add:
Picture from here: NASA Scientists to Discuss Risks of Moon Dust

[edit on 3/9/2007 by defcon5]



posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:16 PM
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I found this picture.

Dusty astronaut.
So my next question would be how did they refill the cabin with air?
Wouldnt all the oxygen dissipate once the hatch was opened?

I will admit I dont know too much about the moon missions, but you guys are helping me.



posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:17 PM
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Simple laws of adhesion and cohesion. Most people think that the moon has such a low gravity that the dust should just float, but that is a common misconception. Actually most Americans believe we were the first in space and the only ones on the moon. They also believe that the moon does not have any gravity! But yes, laws of physics clearly give reason as to why the moondust "stuck" to the suits.



posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:23 PM
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Here is an even better article and picture on the subject:


The Smell of Moondust
How do you sniff moondust?
Every Apollo astronaut did it. They couldn't touch their noses to the lunar surface. But, after every moonwalk (or "EVA"), they would tramp the stuff back inside the lander. Moondust was incredibly clingy, sticking to boots, gloves and other exposed surfaces. No matter how hard they tried to brush their suits before re-entering the cabin, some dust (and sometimes a lot of dust) made its way inside.
Once their helmets and gloves were off, the astronauts could feel, smell and even taste the moon.

Below: At the end of a long day on the moon, Apollo 17 astronaut Gene cernan rests inside the lunar module Challenger. Note the smudges of dust on his longjohns and forehead. Photo credit: Jack Schmitt.


Below: Aren't spacesuits supposed to be white? This one, worn by Apollo 17 astronaut Jack Schmitt, is grayed by moondust.



posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:26 PM
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Great links Defcon5! Helps support the reason for removal of moondust. Think of all the radiation that stuff has been exposed to. Though it wont hold long, it still is a lot of radioactive particles to be exposed to.



posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:29 PM
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Originally posted by 11Bravo
I found this picture.

Dusty astronaut.

Good find...




Originally posted by 11Bravo
So my next question would be how did they refill the cabin with air?
Wouldnt all the oxygen dissipate once the hatch was opened?


I cannot find anything specific written on it yet, but here is a good write up on Wiki:
Lunar Lander
I am pretty positive though that the entire LEM was built like an airlock, so they got suited up before opening the door, they depressurized the LEM, left the craft, when they were done for the day they would enter the craft, close the door, repressurize the LEM, and then get out of their suits.


[edit on 3/9/2007 by defcon5]



posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:31 PM
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Sure looks dusty huh?
But still, why no dust here?
Didnt the LEM stir up any dust?
I mean, looking at that spacesuit, and how dusty they got working on the moon, I would expect to see lots of dust on the landing gear...no?



posted on Mar, 9 2007 @ 12:50 PM
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You might find your answer in this PDF about the LEM:
Apollo Operatons Handbook Lunar Module (LM 11 and Subsequent) Vol. 2 Operational Procedure
If you recall the movie Apollo 13, frank Gorman kept playing with the Cabin Repress valve, I am pretty sure that is the lever used to repressurize the LEM after a day’s lunar excursion.


Originally posted by 11Bravo
But still, why no dust here?
Didnt the LEM stir up any dust?

Hm, you might have to get another member on this one. I don’t have anything more then guesses…
My first guess would be that the dust is very fine, and that gear is covered in smooth foil which it would not stick to like the cloth of a space suit. Secondly if there is a fine layer of dust on the gear it may not show up well in the photo because of the reflective orange foil. Then there is the fact that when the LEM landed the engine exhaust might have blown any dust off the gear. Again these are all guess on my part I don’t have an exact answer for you on it.



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