It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Neanderthals were cannibals

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 4 2006 @ 08:28 PM
link   
Check out the story about it here

I guess the term "Do what ya gotta do" applies here.

[edit on 4-12-2006 by kleverone]

[edit on 4-12-2006 by kleverone]




posted on Dec, 4 2006 @ 08:33 PM
link   

Neanderthals suffered periods of starvation and may have supplemented their diet through cannibalism, according to a study of remains from northwest Spain.


How is this any different from what Homosapiens have done? Lots of species eat their own kind, it's apparently bad for Humans to do so but it can happen from time to time.



posted on Dec, 4 2006 @ 08:34 PM
link   
I can't really say that it is any different, just a confirmation of what was probably suspected.



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 04:01 AM
link   
That's really positive confirmation:




Neanderthals suffered periods of starvation and may have supplemented their diet through cannibalism, ...


For humans the main problem with cannibalism, as far as I know, is that it's addictive, basically once you start going that way, it's like a drug...



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 04:08 AM
link   
In some cases it may have had some kind of religious significance for some: Cannibalism is one of the two most ancient "ritual practices" known to prehistoric humans. It was a ritual means for gaining the strength of vanquished foes.

The other most widely know "ritual" involved the use of "Red Earth", likely used as a body paint to help ward off evil spirits...Or maybe they just used it to help ward off sunburn, who knows?



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 04:22 AM
link   
So far, there isn't a lot of evidence for Neanderthal Spirituality.
No cave art, simple tool design, no statues or carvings.
I'm pretty sure thats still true, although someone here might know of some instances.


There is evidence that they buried their dead..but was it for spritual purposes, or just to avoid attracting predators/scavengers?

I'm guessing the cannibalism was for survival purposes only.



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 04:29 AM
link   


I'm guessing the cannibalism was for survival purposes only.

well can you blame them
it was cold and dark and the supermarket wasn't due to open for another 30,000 years




posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 04:32 AM
link   
NOPE, you do what you gotta do!
Especially when there is no drive thru!

Imagine what it would be like to still have 2 species of human alive on the planet in this modern age. I wonder how we would treat each other.
I have a feeling they would be sewing our clothes in sweatshops.



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 05:48 AM
link   
what's got me wondering,

the article states that evidence of apparent cannibalism;
is finding the 'long bones' (like leg & arm bones) broken apart,
also finding skulls broken apart...ostensively for the nutritious marrow

i never thought the tough skull bones as filled with marrow
but only protecting the brain inside, & something to hang ears on

not trying to be a neanderthal advocate, but it may be that a unique
circumstance caused a prehistoric 'Donner Party' event to happen,
and the discovery of these bones/fossils suggesting cannibalism
has been exaggerated to cast a broad net over our prehistoric 'cousins'

~?~



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 11:49 AM
link   
I always thought that the Neanderthals died out because a more savage predator decided they were a food source
as far as I know Cannibalism is ony 100% verified by examining coprolites
en.wikipedia.org...
and no Neanderthal coprolites have ever been analysed
and when I say more savage predator theres really no prozes for guessing which one I'm talking about is there

after all Anthropophagy in the species I'm talking about is a known fact with a well established heritage
www.yoniversum.nl...



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 12:02 PM
link   
I would imagine that to them meat was a precious commodity whenever or where ever they found it. Especially if they were starveing. They probably did'nt have all the taboos of modern society.

Incest and cannibalism might've been "normal" for them some of the time if not all the time.



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 12:11 PM
link   
Animals Generally have a natural defense against cannibalism because a the animals that partake usually develope brain disease. Most recently Mad cow disease but even humans will get brain diseases from eating too many of their own kind. Apparently this didn't stop our ansestors though.


Summary: Genetic markers commonly found in modern humans all over the world could be evidence that our earliest ancestors were cannibals, according to new research. Scientists suggest that even today many of us carry a gene that evolved as protection against brain diseases that can be spread by eating human flesh.

The brain diseases, called prion diseases, are characterized by loss of coordination, dementia, paralysis, and eventually death. Modern examples include Creutzfeld Jacob disease and kuru in humans, and mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, in animals.


Source



posted on Dec, 5 2006 @ 12:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by kleverone
Check out the story about it


They were apparently cannibals on occasion, or so the article says... not regular cannibals.

Heck, homo sapiens has practiced cannibalism. So have most of the other life forms on this planet.



posted on Dec, 6 2006 @ 03:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by Indellkoffer
Heck, homo sapiens has practiced cannibalism. So have most of the other life forms on this planet.

Some notable examples include: Monitor Lizard sometimes eats its own eggs; The female Preying Mantis will try to eat the male after mating (Same with the Black Widow Spiders)...
Lots of examples abound in the animal kingdom...And humanity was probably just a bit above animals in intelligence at that time anyway.


Originally posted by spacedoubt
So far, there isn't a lot of evidence for Neanderthal Spirituality.
No cave art, simple tool design, no statues or carvings.

Actually, the use of Red Earth & Canibalism are two of Neanderthal known ritual practices. They are also the first of human progenetors to have buried their dead (for whatever reason)...Earlier species of proto-humans never practiced burial. They'd just leave their dead wherever they happened to fall down.

[edit on 6-12-2006 by MidnightDStroyer]



posted on Dec, 6 2006 @ 10:21 AM
link   
I understand that "cannibalism," was a subliminal attempt at poulation reduction, same as how early indigenous people's body matched the animal's and homosexuality and lesbianism caught on.

You can get "Kuru Kuru," from eating human meat especially from the CSF Brain system. It existed in the Pacific Rim I think, in the Polynesian's.

Cannibalism exists alot in the Far East especially in Red China and Japan, go see on the Net.

I don't know if anybody would agree with this at all, just a heretic's point of view.







[edit on 6-12-2006 by blingblong]

[edit on 6-12-2006 by blingblong]



posted on Dec, 6 2006 @ 10:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by spacedoubt
So far, there isn't a lot of evidence for Neanderthal Spirituality.
No cave art, simple tool design, no statues or carvings.
I'm pretty sure thats still true, although someone here might know of some instances.


Actually, yes, I do. When they buried their dead, they made rainbow patterns out of flowers to lay the body down on. We know this because of pollen grains that were found in graves. So, there was a spiritual aspect to their burial rituals.

The article says that it may indidcate cannibalism. So it hasn't been confirmed yet, the subject title is misleading and inaccurate. While there is some evidence of cannibalism, it does appear that it was not widespread, it was only sometimes. They're not sure if it was out of necessity or for spiritual reasons.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join