What Makes Quebec So Special?

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posted on Nov, 2 2006 @ 06:45 PM
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Canada has around 7 million French-Canadians and the vast majority of them live in Quebec. The million or so that don't are not considered ''special' or 'distinct' enough to be part of the club.

The sovereignty movement in Quebec has nothing to do with being French or protecting the culture and language. Quebec, like any other province, is just a bunch of dirt. It's the people of French-Canadian descent in all parts of Canada, immigrants from France or Haiti or somewhere else that speak French and community groups that keep the French culture alive across Canada. The culture is in the people, not in a bunch of dirt.

So why is it that people who live in Quebec, even the ones that don't speak French, are somehow different and distinct from French-Canadians outside of Quebec?

When did this stop being about French-Canadian culture and start being a high-stakes real-estate dispute?




posted on Nov, 3 2006 @ 04:29 PM
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Exactly Duzey. There are many parts of Canada that have French communities. Northern NB, The French Shore NS, Northern Ontario, Manitoba, etc. So basically, what gives?



posted on Nov, 4 2006 @ 07:54 AM
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Honestly, I don't think there is an answer.

It's like, Why do we talk funny? Why do I wake up at 8am every damn morning? Why is Quebec so damn arrogant that they hold some some sort of advantage over the rest of us?

I don't know! It Just Is!

Canada and diversity are synonymous. Our mixture of culture and language is what makes us special. Anyone who wants to take away from that is looking to do harm to our country and its image.

This goes beyond Quebec in my opinion though. Why do we have any of these labels?

Why are they a French-Canadian? Am I an English-Canadian? DirtyAccent-Canadian? No, I'm just a plain old, run of the mill, Canadian.

Why is it African-American? I've never heard of a British-American or Canadian-American. If I were born in Africa and moved to the United States, would I be an African-American?

I submit we abolish it all. Your Canadian or your American.



posted on Nov, 4 2006 @ 03:25 PM
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A Canuck is a Canuck is a Canuck, eh?

I agree that there really isn't any need for such identifiers. I do get the impression that most Quebecios, French-Canadians or whatever the heck they want to be called now, take pride in their heritage and want to be called something other than just plain-old Canadian, because they are unique and distinct.

We all know how important it is to Quebec to be different.


If we abolish such terms, are we still being inclusive and multicultural or is that the road that leads to the American-style melting pot and Quebec pitching the biggest fit ever?



posted on Nov, 4 2006 @ 04:40 PM
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That Certain Je Ne Sais Quois

If you have to ask, you'll never understand.


From my perspective, there will always be some sort of tension between a distinct cultural or ethnic minority and a national culture or identity as a whole.

We certainly see this in the U.S. with the whole "hyphenated Americans" controversy, and if the international media is any guide, such tensions exist pretty much everywhere in the world.

I think to the extent such "subcultures" can distinguish themselves as cultural and ethnic versus political or national, tensions can be minimized.

But to the extent they declare themselves distinct in political or national ways, tensions will naturally rise.

In the case of Quebec, I think a lot of the uneasiness stems from uncertainty in this regard, and such efforts as the Quebec sovereignty movement serve to exacerbate these tensions.

After all, there's nothing like demanding your own country to make other Canadians think you don't like being Canadian.



posted on Nov, 4 2006 @ 04:40 PM
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Originally posted by Duzey
A Canuck is a Canuck is a Canuck, eh?


clears throat... You Know it!

*Insert Fist Pump*



Originally Posted by Duzey
If we abolish such terms, are we still being inclusive and multicultural or is that the road that leads to the American-style melting pot and Quebec pitching the biggest fit ever?


I don't think abolishing the term itself takes away from our diversity. What is in a label anyways? As we have both said previously, the latter of the label needs a little more emphasized. French-Canadian.

Who let Majic in here?


[edit on 4-11-2006 by chissler]



posted on Nov, 4 2006 @ 05:01 PM
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Foreign Exchange


Originally posted by chissler
Who let Majic in here?

I heard there was free beer, eh?



posted on Nov, 4 2006 @ 06:00 PM
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Originally posted by Majic
Foreign Exchange


Originally posted by chissler
Who let Majic in here?

I heard there was free beer, eh?




Nah, that was something new Duze tried but intrepid made... abit of a scene. Simon said the free beer had to go, or the Forum. Needless to say the Forum is still alive. We can't talk about it though, you know who, gets alittle upset.

Back to the topic!



[edit on 4-11-2006 by chissler]



posted on Nov, 6 2006 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by Majic
If you have to ask, you'll never understand.

Is this where I should say that even though I might never understand why Quebecers feel as they do, I accept and acknowledge the fact that they feel that way?

That's what my therapist suggested for these kinds of situations.



Originally posted by chissler
What is in a label anyways?

I think that people use these kinds of labels to give them a sense of belonging and keep in touch with their heritage.

While I may not see the need for labels, I can accept that some people want to use them to identify with their cultural or ethnic group. If they want to label themselves to get a sense of belonging and community, I don't have a problem with it. I don't want a label, but I'm not adverse to people labeling themselves if that's what they want to do.

The people who call themselves French-Canadian don't bother me in the slighest, it's the people that call themselves Quebecois that worry me. There is no Canadian in Quebecois, and it's intentional.

Why don't they like us anymore?



posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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Hi there I'm a "French Canadian" from Québec Montréal and I think the actual term French Canadian is simply a matter of majority, the majority of Canada speaks English and the majority of Québec speaks French and most a rather poor English. This all dates back to the war between the British Empire and the french to keep their heritage here which was respectable at the time... Nowadays when I here Quebecers talking about the English most of them don't really know why they hate the English, it's misplaced anger from being mostly ignorant to general culture. For more open minded people you can go down town where cultures from around the world converge together in downtown Montreal.

There is no more place for hate and ignorance in this world!! Love one another for we are one family living in the same world, we gotta spread the Love ( and you'll be surprised how fast it goes around )

Peace and Create Love for you are God and YOU CREATE LIFE YOU CREATE LOVE
Holla!





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