Laser Guided Tank Round Scores Direct Hit

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posted on Sep, 25 2006 @ 08:54 PM
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Raytheon testing a new next generation tank round which is guided by a semi active laser system scored a direct hit against a moving T-72 target. The round, fired from a M1A2 SEP Abrams tank, hit the T-72 at a distance of 5.4 miles and according to the report it hit within inches of the designated mark. Personally I find this system impressive because of the extended range and precision that it offeres.



Raytheon successfully conducted the first beyond line of sight mission with a test firing of its Mid Range Munition Chemical Energy (MRM-CE) guided projectile with digital semi active laser sensor. The projectile, fired from an Abrams M1A2 SEP (system enhancement program) tank, scored an extended-range, guided direct hit.

The test firing at the U.S. Army's Yuma, Ariz., Proving Grounds demonstrated the laser-guided seeker's ability to successfully target, acquire and track a moving tank and guide the munition to intercept at a distance of 5.4 miles (8.7 km).

"The round hit within inches of the aim point demonstrating 100 percent mission success. The MRM-CE 'One Team' concept uniting the Army's Picatinny Arsenal, General Dynamics Ordnance Tactical Systems and Raytheon is at the core of our success," said Rick Williams, Raytheon Missile Systems' MRM program manager.

Source




posted on Sep, 25 2006 @ 08:59 PM
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Give it to Iran!
Seriously, is it a major breaktrough in the domain? What was the greatest distance that a M1A2 SEP hitted another moving tank? And is it really useful today when most battles are in cities, not in flat lands like in WW2?

[edit on 25-9-2006 by Vitchilo]



posted on Sep, 25 2006 @ 09:10 PM
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Well, imagine sniping from a tank into a city from outside of the city. It would allow the armed forces to engage the opfor with out being exposed to ambush or close quarter combat. A laser guided munition is great for MBT rounds, what would be even better is for personel.

I agree that the increased range is great, however the visual recognition of targets at that range is going to be a very difficult challenge at best. Most thermal is only good for recog up to 2,000 meters, it is less than that range for actual features to be made out.

So most engagements were under 2,000 meters and not as far as 5 miles or further.



posted on Sep, 25 2006 @ 10:03 PM
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Well with teh advent UAV's, a tank could just dtand off and fire rounds with teh UAV illimunation the target, the same goes for personel.
As a previous poster alluded to this would be perfect for " tank sniping " especially in urban areas, a tank could just stand off and have the infantry illuminationg the target.



posted on Sep, 26 2006 @ 03:42 AM
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Originally posted by Vitchilo
Give it to Iran!
Seriously, is it a major breaktrough in the domain? What was the greatest distance that a M1A2 SEP hitted another moving tank? And is it really useful today when most battles are in cities, not in flat lands like in WW2?

[edit on 25-9-2006 by Vitchilo]


being on the defensive side in a city , would you move your tanks around a lot ?Do correct me if i'm wrong but I'd rather have my lighter armour move around and harass (as it is supposed to) and keep my heavier armour "hidden" and holding .Is such a technology a real advantage in such a scenario ? As Vitchilo mentionned , it's not WWII anymore or at least it's not the type of combat we would have in a central european type of theater. On the other hand , there's a lot of open terrain in the middle east.



posted on Sep, 26 2006 @ 08:26 AM
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I'm too lazy to find the links but I am sure the Russians have had laser guided rounds in their tanks for years and years with 8km range.



posted on Sep, 26 2006 @ 04:17 PM
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The M551 Sheridan was an airborne tank the US used in Nam all the way up until after Desert Storm. It could fire ATGM's out of its main gun, but it couldnt hit a tank at 5 miles I dont think. But these were also not laser guided tank rounds. I think that the guidance is the big story here.

en.wikipedia.org...

[edit on 9/26/2006 by ludaChris]





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