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Our Future Society

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posted on Oct, 29 2002 @ 01:03 PM
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The last post I saw on here was by Freemason on 28/10/02. Until now. I came on to this thread just to see how the disscussion was going. But all I found was Threats, vulgarity, and mindless babbleling.

Guys it is not worth taking your thoughts to the extent that you will know it will offend. I heard that there was children members on this site, I know that Necro is also still a youth and maybe he does need to learn some manners but the best thing to do is not to play along with someone who is only interested in insulting others when he is corrected.

Thankyou william for the editing you did there on Necro's post. But I would still like to see a more strict ruling to apply if and when someone steps out of line. This does not mean that I am trying to restrict ones freedom of speech or oppinion, but I think that we should stop and think about what is there to be gained by just posting grevious wording to another member. I dont believe that this community should be a place where we can just let of steam and say our piece whenever we are countered to our own views. This is a site where we should be working together for the sole purpose of what Mr Simon Gray had in mind when he founded this site.

This is a very interesting topic and a very important one also, because we are all involved in what happens to our Future Society. It is also not fair on the author Enigmatic that we are useing his thread to our own pleasing.

So come on guys lets get back to the topic in hand.




posted on Oct, 29 2002 @ 05:05 PM
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Yes this is a most interesting topic and most important as well, and I'd like to refere to BEFORE I blew up at Necro to where I stated that music effects society and that the Greeks had tested this 3000 years ago and found it to be so.

I am really interested in seeing what people have to say about that, don't know how we got of topic =D

Sincerely,
no signature



posted on Oct, 29 2002 @ 07:35 PM
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Oh, my! Another human being on the planet that believes that one can exercise one's freedom of speech without using vulgarity. There's hope yet!
As a matter of fact, Stewards, if you check out the terms and conditions, which is the first forum listed, you'll find that there is a rule of no potty-mouth. It is refreshing to see yet another mannered person join our little community. That goes for you as well, Freemason.
I look forward to disagreeing with the both of you down the road. We'll both learn from that, and we'll demonstrate the possibility of doing so without profanity!



posted on Oct, 29 2002 @ 07:55 PM
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I only get a potty mouth around those most misguided kids whom all too sadly take that final step, and should be delt with....sadly our society just turns a blind eye and the problem gets worse...

errrrn so frustrating *eyes are about to explode*


sincerely,
no signature



posted on Oct, 30 2002 @ 02:21 AM
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So who really turned a blind eye to it?

Text got edited & the point made without resorting to more vulgarity.

Necro seems to be the type who don't realize that "Freedom of Speech" does *not* include falsely yelling "Fire!" in a crowded theatre. He merely seems to need a few more years to grow up & realize that the standard verbage used in Rap music doesn't mesh well with societies outside of street gangs & inner city ghettos...Which is just another indication of a deteriorating society.


So TC, how do you like how I twisted my post from the subject at hand back to the original topic?



posted on Oct, 30 2002 @ 12:37 PM
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Tell me if I'm wrong or right, Freemason, but wasn't that called Harmonics, or something along those lines?



posted on Oct, 30 2002 @ 10:19 PM
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I have no clue because other than the fact I remember reading about it, I know nothing anymore =D just that the greeks acted against it and all...no names, nothing like that


Sincerely,
no signature



posted on Oct, 31 2002 @ 05:43 AM
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M-D, you accomplished the feat like a true master. You have snatched the pebble from the master's hand; go forth into the world as you no longer need the teachings of William.



posted on Oct, 31 2002 @ 06:18 AM
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meanders, digresses, avoids "conspiracy".. but he doesn't want to be awkward.
So: Greeks 3,000 years ago? No, never -speculation: 2,600 maybe.
All talk of "music" with caution because it can be misleading: as the name suggests it meant "related to the Muses" and therefore spread over artistic boundaries we now consider fixed.
On music -in our terms -depends on your Greek. Pythagras by and large believed that music revealed some sort of truth about the mathematical relationships that governed the universe (hence the traditional claim that he discovered the scales: "modes" a more appropriate word. The Greeks then even believed in the therapeutic power of certain kinds of music.
This view coloured Western though for two millennia: the idea that there is a sort of divine music created by the moving spheres of the universe.
As rationalism grew: Greeks became increasingly aware of the power of music to inflame the senses and to make people emotional. So, from a very good thing, it became an ambivalous thing.
Such thinking persisted into the Mediaeval era: should churches allow music (that's still a minor issue to-day -at least regarding the kind of music)? What modes are allowable ("keys" almost in modern parlance" - even to the point where certain intervals were regarded as diabolical and were forbidden in ecclesiastical music -the seventh is the classic example (much favoured in blues and rock).
The power of music remains perplexing: conservative Romans observed that only a man who was drunk would dance. Conservatyive Estragon recalls picking his daughter up from rather expensive disco's and wondering whether he hadn't stumbled into Dante's Inferno by mistake.
On the other hand: a Bach mass still transforms Estragon on its umpteenth hearing -and he still doesn't know how or why. Tom wait singing Tom Traubert's Blues has a similar effect.
I'm rather glad that music is so strange and incomprehensible in its power.
And "harmonics" -Greek? Yes: meaning what was suggested here: "No".



posted on Oct, 31 2002 @ 06:19 AM
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meanders, digresses, avoids "conspiracy".. but he doesn't want to be awkward.
So: Greeks 3,000 years ago? No, never -speculation: 2,600 maybe.
All talk of "music" with caution because it can be misleading: as the name suggests it meant "related to the Muses" and therefore spread over artistic boundaries we now consider fixed.
On music -in our terms -depends on your Greek. Pythagras by and large believed that music revealed some sort of truth about the mathematical relationships that governed the universe (hence the traditional claim that he discovered the scales: "modes" a more appropriate word. The Greeks then even believed in the therapeutic power of certain kinds of music.
This view coloured Western though for two millennia: the idea that there is a sort of divine music created by the moving spheres of the universe.
As rationalism grew: Greeks became increasingly aware of the power of music to inflame the senses and to make people emotional. So, from a very good thing, it became an ambivalous thing.
Such thinking persisted into the Mediaeval era: should churches allow music (that's still a minor issue to-day -at least regarding the kind of music)? What modes are allowable ("keys" almost in modern parlance" - even to the point where certain intervals were regarded as diabolical and were forbidden in ecclesiastical music -the seventh is the classic example (much favoured in blues and rock).
The power of music remains perplexing: conservative Romans observed that only a man who was drunk would dance. Conservatyive Estragon recalls picking his daughter up from rather expensive disco's and wondering whether he hadn't stumbled into Dante's Inferno by mistake.
On the other hand: a Bach mass still transforms Estragon on its umpteenth hearing -and he still doesn't know how or why. Tom Waits singing "Tom Traubert's Blues" still has a similar effect. "Land of Hope and Glory" still freaks me: and I'm not sure it's just Elgar's marvellous craftsmanship.
I'm rather glad that music is so strange and incomprehensible in its power.
And "harmonics" -Greek? Yes: meaning what was suggested here: "No".



posted on Oct, 31 2002 @ 07:26 AM
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Thanks for the info, you juggled my brain to remember the old idea of the Harmony of the Spheres. Thanks a bunch.



posted on Oct, 31 2002 @ 10:30 PM
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Originally posted by Thomas CrowneM-D, you accomplished the feat like a true master. You have snatched the pebble from the master's hand; go forth into the world as you no longer need the teachings of William.

Now I can search out the font of the ultimate wisdom...I'm ready to seek the holy teachings of the Almighty J. R. "Bob" Dobbs!


As far as Pythagoras found out about the string-length of the lyre; The most basic observation he made was that two notes were considered to be one octave apart if one string was half the length of the other. From there, it was pretty simple to get the other notes within an octave by using fractions of the string-length. Hence came "proof" of one of his other theories..."Number is All".

Pythogoras revolutionized mathematics by proving the existance of Irrational Numbers...

And if you talk to a songwriter, they'll admit that the most basic science used to create music is mathematics (Right after plagerism, of course
).


[Edited on 1-11-2002 by MidnightDStroyer]



posted on Nov, 1 2002 @ 02:16 AM
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Pretty much so, MidnightD... it's often been said that our Western Culture is a set of footnotes to the Greeks.



posted on Nov, 2 2002 @ 07:04 AM
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...And let's not forget that a good chunk of Greek culture came from the Egyptians...



posted on Nov, 2 2002 @ 07:26 AM
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Yes, indeed, MidnightD -even in Homer there are allusions to the ancient wisdom and culture of the Egyptians -of course, the great days of Egyptian culture had to a degree gone even then, but the power of the legend must have been enormous.
There's nothing solid on Pythagoras, really, anywhere; but you'll see him frequently linked to Egypt in the legends.



posted on Nov, 2 2002 @ 01:09 PM
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Has anyone read the book 'Brave New World'? It is a really creepy book about the future. No one even knows what a family or a house is. And everyone is drugged up all the time, so that they have a false sense of happiness. And babies are grown in incubators. Everyone's place in society is predetermined. Very bizarre!



posted on Nov, 2 2002 @ 08:08 PM
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1984 and the Giver are way better because it actually shows a plausible future, not some existance where scientists magically took over the world....hmm I just realized, the best way to prevent mad scientists, is hookers
the whole reason they try to take over the world or get rid of families is because they can't get laid


Sincerely,
no signature



posted on Nov, 3 2002 @ 01:59 AM
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I'd recommend Huxley as a read - it goes well side-by-side with "1984": Huxley's a better literary stylist; but there's a current of humour that dilutes the effect.
He wrote -quite a bit later - a "Revisited" sequel: that's interesting too.



posted on Nov, 3 2002 @ 02:01 AM
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And looking at some of my colleagues in the stinks-and-bangs departments -I'd say Free Mason has probably hit upon the truth.



posted on Nov, 3 2002 @ 01:17 PM
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Lol at above posts


I have read 'The Giver' before. I have never read '1984'. I mentioned 'Brave New World', because I have to type an eight page essay about it for English class. I plan typing most of it today. Homework, ugh, I hate it!




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