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Patriot Act Takes Aim At Those With Allergies.

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posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 08:46 PM
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meth? no, no way. its poison. heroin (derivatives thereof anyway) and coke ACTUALLY have medicinal use


Not true, relatives of meth are used to treat ADD/ADHD. Ever heard of the drug adderall? I not saying by anymeans it is good for you, but there are medical uses. JFK used to take meth, as did Hitler, it was given to them by their doctors.

As I posted earlier, Sudafed and all generic copies have changed their ingredient so it cannot be made into meth. They used to contain pseudoephedrine, which has one more oxygen molecule than meth. Now they use phenylephrine.

Meth is a problem and it will not just go away with these restrictions.




posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 08:57 PM
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JFK used to take meth, as did Hitler, it was given to them by their doctors.


Don't forget Fred Phelps.


In 1968, Phelps tried to commit suicide while high on methamphetamines, attempting to shoot himself in the head with a shotgun; he was so inebriated, however, that he ended up missing his head completely and striking a roll of insulation. [40] Shortly thereafter, Phelps overdosed on a cocktail of alcohol and amphetamines. [41] He slipped into a coma and was rushed to the hospital, where he remained comatose for a week.

en.wikipedia.org



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 08:58 PM
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This has nothing to do with the PATRIOT Act. It is modeled off of the Trooper Nik Green law here in Oklahoma.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 3-9-2006 by Valhall]


df1

posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 09:17 PM
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Valhall
This has nothing to do with the PATRIOT Act.

Exactly, it has nothing to do with the "patriot act" and it has nothing to do with terrorism. As such, it does not belong in the "patriot act", which we are told is to combat terrorism.



posted on Mar, 9 2006 @ 09:34 PM
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I think that it is interesting that Diane Feinstein had so much to do with this provision. Feinstein was the force behind the inane Assault Weapons Ban that banned guns on the basis of their appearance rather than their function. The NRA warned her that such was senseless, but she didn't listen and when gun manufacturers got rid of the offending cosmetics, Feinstein hit the ceiling. Most gun savvy folks refer to the ban as the "Ugly Gun Ban." I guess that it goes without saying that I opposed that law.

Now, we have Diane Feinstein as a driving force behind a provision that was applied to the controversial Patriot Act for the sole purpose of making the bill more palatable to legislators. I actually approve of the Patriot Act, as long as it is time limited, and any measure that would make meth a less attractive high for druggies, but I somehow find it a little hard to believe that Feinstein would be associated with anything that would facilitate the Patriot Act. Am I missing something here?


The anti-meth measure, championed by Missouri Republican Sen. Jim Talent and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., would restrict common cold products containing pseudoephedrine, the main ingredient used in making meth, and require that they be placed behind store counters. It is the first time Congress has approved a comprehensive bill to stem the use and production of meth.

The meth provision was attached to the anti-terror Patriot Act as a legislative strategy to help ensure that Congress would approve it in a timely fashion.

www.news-leader.com



[edit on 2006/3/9 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Mar, 10 2006 @ 02:37 PM
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By Valhall
This has nothing to do with the PATRIOT Act. It is modeled off of the Trooper Nik Green law here in Oklahoma.


Val, you are 100% right. I also live in OK and remember well the "Nicky Green" incident, etc... Now that you mention it, I do believe that this whole put the sudafed behind the counter stuff did start up right about that time. At least talk of it did.

Now, whatever Diane Feinstein (D-CA), who has been a California Senator for a very long time has to do with this whole Oklahoma trooper business - that is sort of strange. Sounds almost personal, but..............I don't know.



posted on Mar, 10 2006 @ 05:51 PM
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quote: as did Hitler, it was given to them by their doctors.

lol not meaning to nitpick, but that "may" not be the best example...but thats just me.



I think that is a perfect example.


Ephedra has been banned for a while now, at least where I'm from. They used to sell it as 'herbal extacy' for a while and it gave a bunch of kids heart attacks.

I agree, this has nothing to do with the Patriot Act.



posted on Mar, 11 2006 @ 07:23 PM
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This has nothing at all to do with the patriot act?

It is nothing more then another bill attached to it. Why try and make something out of this by implying it is all because of the patriot act???



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 03:47 AM
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300 pills a month = roughly 10 a day, right? Now i don't personally know of any allergy that means you've got to take 10 (or even five for that matter) or more pills of the same type a day to supress the symptoms of an allergy, do you?

[edit on 12-3-2006 by Lanton]


df1

posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 10:29 PM
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Lanton
300 pills a month = roughly 10 a day, right? Now i don't personally know of any allergy that means you've got to take 10 (or even five for that matter) or more pills of the same type a day to supress the symptoms of an allergy, do you?

Obviously your logic is faulty.

You do not know how many people are in my family that require this type of medication and neither does the government. This forces every member of my family to go and purchase their government approved allocation seperately.

Boy oh, boy. Feed some people a little bit of drug war rhetoric with a dash of terrorism and some folks will mindlessly buy into anything the government is selling.

Meth labs and drug dealing occur in your neighborhood because the government has made them illegal. If people could go buy whatever drug their little heart desires at walmart the problem would not exist.

[edit on 12-3-2006 by df1]



posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 10:37 PM
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So they've got to take more than 10 "A" pills a day?


df1

posted on Mar, 12 2006 @ 10:57 PM
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Lanton, why are you are you so hung up the dosage of medication required by my family? The number 10 is a random number they pulled out of a hat. You can't prove otherwise, because our congress had no hearings to discuss the issue.

This should not be ok with anyone.




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