It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NEWS: Greenpeace Step Up Anti Japanese Whaling Campaign

page: 1
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 07:13 PM
link   
Two greenpeace ships are planning interference with the Japanese whaling industry in the Southern Ocean. Japan has announced plans to double the previous quota numbers to 935 minke whales and target for the first time fin whales in the Antarctic in a move that has outraged greenpeace. Japan has been the target of many international protests of it's whaling industry to no avail. Greenpeace has stated that it feels more international attention should be called to the issue.
 



www.abc.net.au

ABC News

"I think the whalers would prefer that this was out of sight and out of mind and we're determined to make sure that the world really knows what's really happening down in the depths of the Southern Ocean."


Pic - SA Tourism
Mr Rattenbury says campaigners will risk their own safety to defend whales.

"We'll be aiming to catch up with the whaling fleet and get as close as possible to ensure that the whales aren't hunted," he said.

"That'll potentially involve literally being right in between the whale and the harpoon as they're trying to take aim.

"So it will be quite risky but our crews are all very well trained and certainly our tactics will be non-violent."



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


If this raises awareness of what the Japanese whalers are doing then so be it. So far Japan has snubbed it's nose at all international attempts to have them tone down or stop the whaling altogether. The whale numbers are being seriously damaged by the heavy whaling.

Humpback whales will also be targetted by the whalers, an endangered species. The Fin Whales are also listed as endangered. This is an issue the world needs to be aware of.


Related News Links:
whales.greenpeace.org
www.japantoday.com
news.xinhuanet.com
www.mg.co.za

[edit on 18-11-2005 by Mayet]

[edit on 18-11-2005 by Mayet]




posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 07:18 PM
link   

as posted by Mayet
If this raises awareness of what the Japanese whalers are doing then so be it.

Yeah, I can concur with that. You know, freedom of speech and the right to protest and all.
Lets just hope that Greenpeace has gotten hold of some up-to-date nautical maps, so they do not run into more of those endangered coral reefs.






seekerof



posted on Nov, 18 2005 @ 07:23 PM
link   
*laughs. Yes well that is true isn't it.

This is an issue where the rest of the world is saying no and the Japanese continue to arogantly flaunt their whaling. To make it worse it is not Japanese waters they are whaling in. Its the Southern Ocean, one of the last bastions of untouched nature.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 11:08 AM
link   
Okay... not to belittle this subject or anything, but wouldn't an "anti Japanese whaling campaign" be some sort of whaling campaign designed to oppose the Japanese? I'm not sure how a whaling campaign could be anti Japanese myself...



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 12:25 PM
link   
This actually makes me really angry. The japanese are killing the same whales that travel up the coasts of Australia and New Zeland and are enjoyed by the Japanese tourists.

And for what reason do they kill them? To fulfill "cultural obligations" for a meat that few japanese like or want. Its just arrogence and greed by the japanese that allows this situation to continue.

So "run interference" with the fleet? Rather they siink them in my opinion.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 03:07 PM
link   
Netchicken: How do you speak for all the people of Japan like that? Can you pull up a census or a poll that backs up your claims?

I don't see the problem, Inuits in Alaska still whale but Greenpeace isn't going to dare go north! The water is too cold! They would much rather take a cruise through the tropical islands instead.

I personally wouldn't mind eating whale at some point.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 05:18 PM
link   
While Greenpeace isnt perfect their missions are not just a Sunday on the lake,they will get in between the harpoons and the whales.What may seem extreme to some is actually meak in comparison to the gravity of some situations.Some of these slaughters will have an attempted justification that it's done in the name of science.Killing endangered species in a sanctuary cant be justified.This is environmental terrorism and should be met with force.I admire Greenpeace for not just talkin the talk and for understanding symbiotic relationships and for setting an example of whats needed to protect them.There is a greater consequence,this is alot more than just a few dead whales.

[edit on 19-11-2005 by jimstradamus]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 05:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by Netchicken
And for what reason do they kill them? To fulfill "cultural obligations" for a meat that few japanese like or want. Its just arrogence and greed by the japanese that allows this situation to continue.


Not really contesting you here, Netchicken, simply asking for clarification.
Your downplaying of Japan's cultural obligations, as you termed it, is befuddling being that the hunting of whales does indeed fulfill Japanese cultural obligations or cultural preservation. So I guess what I am getting at is: are you upset/angry because Japan's obligation to fulfilling cultural obligation is done so in a manner beyond what you think is the correct way of fulfilling their cultrual obligation? More specifically, are you upset/angry because the Japanese are killing more than what is required or deemed as being required or necessary to fulfill that cultural obligation?

I mention such, because there are a number of cultures that hunt whales to fulfill cultural obligation, albeit not on the scale as the Japanese. The Inuits/Eskimos are one, the Makah are another, among very few others.

At any rate, to me, this is boiling down to either a controversy of over-hunting to fulfill that cultural obligations or simply a cultural preservation versus animal rights preservation issue.





seekerof

[edit on 19-11-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 05:58 PM
link   
I would like to know how it can be a culture in Japan when these whales are in the southern ocean?

That doesn't make sense to me but then again endangering species does not either



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 06:08 PM
link   
As mentioned, this is a cultural preservation versus animal rights preservation issue to you, Mayet?

Basically that endangered species should take precedence over traditional Japanese culture or cultural obligation? Japanese cultural whaling traditions go back a couple thousand years, and are an integral part of their community cultures.

I am neither pro or con on this issue, simply pointing out that there is a divergence of opinion in relation to the issue of cultural preservation versus animal preservation.
I ran across this concerning Japanese cutural traditions, hunting areas, how Japanese whale hunting has evolved, etc. Interesting read to some, maybe.
Human Relationships with Whales

And this concerning the evolving of Japanese culture:
Japanese Professor Questions the Existence of Whaling Culture in Japan





seekerof

[edit on 19-11-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 06:44 PM
link   
No I was just commenting and wondering on a previous post that said about it being part of Japans culture.

I have one opinion on this and that is to do with animal preservation and I don't see how me asking a question turns this into a topic of my own opinions.

You say that the tradition goes back thousands of years, I don't see how whaling in the southern ocean can go back thousands of years for a Northern nation. It was a question.

I speak out often on preserving cultures, especially indigenous ones. But see in this case, its not Japanese sea they are whaling in. Its not their waters, its international waters and its off my coastline.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 07:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by Mayet
I have one opinion on this and that is to do with animal preservation and I don't see how me asking a question turns this into a topic of my own opinions.

This whole board is one big opinion, Mayet.
Topics are created for opinion to be given.
I thought the purpose of communications was to express and question?
As such, you and I are simply communicating. I gave an opinion, you questioned. You gave an opinion, I questioned. And with that, I am failing to understand how me asking you a question is turning this topic into an inquisition of your own opinions. I simply see it as conversation on a topic. If you do not wish me to converse with you, give an opinion and/or question your opinions, let me know, and I will rectify the situation by not doing so in the future.





You say that the tradition goes back thousands of years, I don't see how whaling in the southern ocean can go back thousands of years for a Northern nation. It was a question.

And I understood it was a question, for which I responded to it. Did you read the article(s) I posted? They may help explain what you are asking?





I speak out often on preserving cultures, especially indigenous ones. But see in this case, its not Japanese sea they are whaling in. Its not their waters, its international waters and its off my coastline.

International waters are openly used by everyone, Mayet, even little ole' Greenpeace. As such, Japan has the right, according to international laws, including international whaling laws, to be where you do not think they should be. Are they whaling in a nation's waters? If they are, then there may be a justifiable recourse. Just because the Japanese have a long cultrual and traditional whaling history, that does not mean that their hunting of whales, to fulfill that cultural whaling tradition, should be restricted or regulated to strictly hunting for them off the coastal waters of Japan, does it?

Again, if they are hunting whales in international waters, they have every right to do so, just as Greenpeace has every right to seek to counter them....in international waters. If Japan is not breaking current whaling laws in international waters, the problem is then: cultural preservation versus animal rights preservation? Preventing the hunting of endangered species should take precedence over traditional culture preservation or cultural obligation? Are the Japanese breaking any laws set by the International Whaling Commission in hunting whales? And if so, are they legally binding?

I ran across these mentions:


The JARPA-2 plans have created a flurry of activity in Australia and New Zealand, countries which were once highly active in the whaling industry but where hunting now provokes outrage, some of it connected to the burgeoning whale watching industry.

"We are calling on conservation minded governments to make the highest level representations from heads of state to the Prime Minister of Japan," said Philippa Brakes.

"We want them to urge him to address the burgeoning commercial hunts that Japan is conducting under the guise of scientific whaling."


And:


CURRENT MAXIMUM CATCHES
Norway (objection) - 796 minke from the north Atlantic
Japan (scientific) - 935 minke and 10 fin whales from Antarctic; 220 minke, 100 sei, 50 Bryde's and 10 sperm from north-west Pacific
Iceland (scientific) - 39 minke from north Atlantic
Greenland (aboriginal) - 187 minke and 10 fin
Alaska & eastern Siberia (aboriginal) - 140 grey and 67 bowhead
St Vincent & Grenadines (aboriginal) - 4 humpback
Northern Hemisphere catches cover a calendar year; Southern Hemisphere figures span two calendar years


Ending with:


Though Japan's hunting causes widespread concern in western countries, it is supported by a number of other governments; and as yet, the anti-hunt bloc does not have a mechanism through which it can force Japan to scale back or abandon its whaling operation.


Japan's whaling fleet sets sail






seekerof

[edit on 19-11-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 07:12 PM
link   
Shouldn't the whaler's themselves be more concerned than anyone else about whether the whales become extinct? Afterall if they loose the whales than they loose that part of their culture. I think they should make sure that they limit who does it to those doing it for cultural reasons (these people would not want to see whales extinct) and stop those who just do it for money (these people may not care) because they will ruin it for everyone else including the traditional whale hunters who have lived in co-existance with whales for hundreds of years.

[edit on 19-11-2005 by Trent]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 07:25 PM
link   
lets look at some facts here

Whales consume approximately 500 million tons of fish per year that roughly six times total human consumption.

The majority of this is consumed by non-endangered whale species; Minke whales are non-endangered.

Therefore Japan has every right to hunt them as long as they do not violate their quota.

Once again Green peace steps out of line, but hey; what else is new when it comes to them?

Go home Green Peace and make sure you have your sonar working and good maps this time


[edit on 11/19/2005 by shots]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 07:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by Seekerof

Originally posted by Mayet
I have one opinion on this and that is to do with animal preservation and I don't see how me asking a question turns this into a topic of my own opinions.

This whole board is one big opinion, Mayet.
Topics are created for opinion to be given.
I thought the purpose of communications was to express and question?
As such, you and I are simply communicating. I gave an opinion, you questioned. You gave an opinion, I questioned. And with that, I am failing to understand how me asking you a question is turning this topic into an inquisition of your own opinions. I simply see it as conversation on a topic. If you do not wish me to converse with you, give an opinion and/or question your opinions, let me know, and I will rectify the situation by not doing so in the future.


No I would get lonely without you Seeker... besides you make me think...




And I understood it was a question, for which I responded to it. Did you read the article(s) I posted? They may help explain what you are asking?


Reading and researching that and others now



Just because the Japanese have a long cultrual and traditional whaling history, that does not mean that their hunting of whales, to fulfill that cultural whaling tradition, should be restricted or regulated to strictly hunting for them off the coastal waters of Japan, does it?


No I guess it doesn't mean they should be restricted, reading now to find out Laws on International whaling. If none are in place maybe its time some were. The waters are used by everyone, even as a dumping ground as we previously discussed. But think it should be a foreemost respect, respect of other cultures also using those waters. If Japan has such a longing for those whales, then they should start a breeding program t replace the ones they take. Or show the world that it's not young ones or pregnant females taken. In a endangerment case like this unless they can clone the whales, no female should be taken while she is able to reproduce to bring the numbers up again.


Are the Japanese breaking any laws set by the International Whaling Commission in hunting whales? And if so, are they legally binding?


Looking now, If you find the laws first please post them.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 07:32 PM
link   
Mayet:


Looking now, If you find the laws first please post them.

Ran across this [linked below], which covers alot that we have discussed here [ie: IWC, etc.]. It is an .edu site and has no visible date of when created. Seems legit though.


Loopholes in the IWC Moratorium

There are also some loopholes in the IWC Moratorium. First, compliance with the moratorium is voluntary: any IWC member country can file a protest of the moratorium, and then need not abide by it: Norway is hunting Minke whales in the North Atlantic under such a protest. Second, there are exceptions for "aboriginal whaling"; the American Eskimos are still allowed to hunt the bowhead whale and the gray whale, and the Russians are allowed to take 100-200 gray whales to serve to their northern aboriginals. Third, whaling "for scientific research" is still allowed.

WHALING AND FISHING

And this [linked below], another .edu site, which seems a bit biased, but legit enough, nonetheless:


Article VIII of the Whaling Convention permits countries to engage in whaling for the purposes of scientific research.48 It is this provision that conservationists claim Japan has exploited in purporting to cease its commercial whaling, while continuing to kill and allegedly research whales.49 Critics question whether the scientific research is a mere pretext for commercial whaling.50 The IWC contends that the Japanese research explanations are not sufficient, and that its reasons are not “critically important” to justify the killing of whales for research purposes.51 Moreover, the Japanese government sells the meat of whales killed for research purposes for food once the scientists have completed their work.52 This allegation is confirmed by DNA analyses that have found whale meat from these “researched” whales on sale in Japanese markets.53 Tests of 574 samples from Japanese restaurants showed that a high proportion of the whale meat being consumed came from a highly endangered subspecies of minke whales.54

Although scientific permits for research whaling granted by a party state do not explicitly require IWC approval,55 as the leading [*PG330]international authority on whaling regulation, the IWC has passed numerous resolutions criticizing Japan’s scientific whaling.56 In a 1998 resolution, the IWC strongly urged the Japanese government to refrain from issuing scientific permits, and highlighted the concerns of many in the international scientific community over the continuation of lethal whale research programs.57

The primary purpose of Japan’s whaling program, Japan maintains, is to examine the impact of whales on the fisheries resources of the north Pacific, where whales compete for the same fish that feed humans.58 Japan’s justification for the expansion of its north Pacific program is to “[s]urvey prey species and numbers consumed by whales in detail,” and to further contribute to the study of ocean ecosystems.59 Specifically, Japan’s research objective is to “obtain estimates of various biological parameters, especially of age-specific natural mortality.”60

Japan further argues that non-lethal tests and photography are not feasible research methods for these purposes.61 Moreover, Japan defends its practices by stating that the small take of sperm and bryde’s whales will have only a negligible impact on the allegedly abundant stocks of whales for research purposes.62 Furthermore, Japan justifies its commercial sale of previously “researched” whales by the requirement of the Whaling Convention that the byproducts of the research be processed to ensure that resources are not wasted.63 In this regard, Japan argues that its research is not a mere pretext for commercial use, but rather specifically supported by the Whaling Convention.64

JAPANESE WHALING IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN: DEFIANCE OF INTERNATIONAL WHALING NORMS IN THE NAME OF “SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH,” CULTURE, AND TRADITION


So, in one sense, I stand corrected.
In another, my thoughts still lean towads the issue of cultural tradition and preservation of such versus animal preservation [endangered species]. It does appear, based on both sources that what Japan is doing is legally in question.





seekerof

[edit on 19-11-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 07:42 PM
link   

Originally posted by Mayet


Are the Japanese breaking any laws set by the International Whaling Commission in hunting whales? And if so, are they legally binding?


Looking now, If you find the laws first please post them.



Theres a bunch of International laws dealing with whales. In 1946, the International Whaling Convention (IWC) for example still in effect today. Countries such as Japan and Norway have not honored the ban.

link

Im also disturbed about the killing of Sharks for just their fins in Asia. They catch a shark cut off its dorsel fin and throw the rest into the water killing the shark. This is even done to endangered sharks like the peaceful whale shark.

But whales and Dolphins are all cuddly and sweet. People rarely care for animals that are not cute or appear really smart.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 08:01 PM
link   
Thanks Seeker reading now

and yes we had a case here in my town of four tiger sharks being found sans fins, near a residential village. They left the meat and body behind. What a waste, I would have liked them to knock on my door and offer me the meat, boneless shark is yummy.

But food aside, the problem is political, no one speaks out unless it is to their advantage. No one speaks up and says don't do it or we will blow your boats out of the water because they are not prepared for the consequences.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 08:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by ShadowXIX

Theres a bunch of International laws dealing with whales. In 1946, the International Whaling Convention (IWC) for example still in effect today. Countries such as Japan and Norway have not honored the ban.

link



Odd your source does not state exactly what bans they did not honor. Why is that?

Could it be because the site is anti whaling? Hmmmmm.

Have you ever checked Japan's actual take of minke whales and compared them to the IWC quota for each year? I have and they only took 300 yet they had a quota of roughly 450.

Did you know that minke whales are very abundant?

Do you even know how many minke whales exist?

I do its roughly one million.

The bottom line here is they are saying one thing knowing all along they will never get to that number based on the average whales taken each year. Nothing more then saber rattling if you ask me.



posted on Nov, 19 2005 @ 09:00 PM
link   
Shots ok the minke whales may number around 1 million but what about the two endangered whales they are hunting as well.



new topics

top topics



 
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join