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Bristol 188- British origins of SR-71?

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posted on Nov, 3 2005 @ 12:19 PM
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Was this Jet Plane the origins of the YF-12/SR-71? well it sorta looks like one from the front. It probably is not but this design should deffo have been a bomber/High altitude Interceptor. What do you boyz out there think of this Aviation Masterpiece?

www.airsceneuk.org.uk...


[edit on 3-11-2005 by Browno]




posted on Nov, 3 2005 @ 12:27 PM
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That plane is nothing like the SR71. The only real similarities are the shock cones over the intakes.

I admit from that angle you get hit with a resemblance, but other than that they are like vinegar and oil.



posted on Nov, 3 2005 @ 12:29 PM
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Looks more like a twin engine F104 than anything else:


external image

Beefed up Leer Jet?



[edit on 3-11-2005 by skippytjc]

Mod Edit: Image Size – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 3/11/2005 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Nov, 3 2005 @ 12:32 PM
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you can really see the difference when u get to the landing gear. As much as people can say what does that have to do with anything. When u land your plane at huge speeds because of AOA needs and airspeed restrictions. heck the gear can make a plane ugly or a beaut. sorta like some people have a weird thing with feet
. sorry

Over all the thing looks like the ugly duckling



posted on Nov, 3 2005 @ 12:43 PM
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The Bristol 188 was nothing to do with Blackbird although, coincidentally, some early Lockheed schemes did resemble it.

The 188 was a research aircraft only and it was used to test manufacturing techniques for making aircraft out of stainless steel, where it taught BAC not to try using stainless steel again


It was also used to test fly the congiguration of the Avro 730 Mach 2.5 bomber and recce plane that was under development in the mid '50's. The 188 was nominally designed to fly at mach 3 but in really never even passed mach 1 as development was quickly ditched not long after the first flight.



posted on Nov, 3 2005 @ 02:14 PM
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speaking from a non bias perspective when i look at that.i think sr-71..

i know it's very different..but in my opinion out of all the aircraft this looks the most like it.

If it was totally black i think that would really make it look like it.



posted on Nov, 3 2005 @ 02:17 PM
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Originally posted by skippytjc
Looks more like a twin engine F104 than anything else:


F104 was also a Lockheed design, coincidently.



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 03:10 AM
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I dunno, I can see the similarity. Yes, the shock cones are a pretty big one, but so is the thin wings and separate engines. These days everything seems to be integral, well, except for Thunderbolt 2. If it was black it would really help, but I'm assuming it's left in silver/grey to keep the weight and drag of a coat of 2pack down.

I don't know how a T-tail would go at mach 3, though


Stainless steel? Why, oh, why would you choose to experiment with something so much heavier than aluminium?



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 03:22 AM
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Regardless of vague similarity in appearance, how does this indicate an SR-71 origin? Any factual, or even theoretical background info to go with a pic?



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 03:28 AM
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Stainless steel? Why, oh, why would you choose to experiment with something so much heavier than aluminium?


Because aluminium will melt at mach 3 and titanium was unobtainable, as a result of the difficulty in building the 188 BAC decided to peg the speed of Concorde at mach 2 so normal materials could still be used.


Regardless of vague similarity in appearance, how does this indicate an SR-71 origin? Any factual, or even theoretical background info to go with a pic?


It doesn't, there is no link to the Blackbird whatsoever, the 188 was linked to the Avro 730 and BAC SST programmes, nothing else.

Looking back on the 188 it is easy to mock it, especially in comparison with the SR-71, however it is worth remembering that this aircraft was designed in 1953 and was the first attempt to develop a practical mach 3 aeroplane. Sometimes the things that don't work (just like the Comet 1) give us more valuable knowledge than the things that do.

Besides, bearing in mind how early this was designed, there is a possibility that Lockheed took some small amount of inspiration from it, but it is only a possibility as there is nothing to back it up.



[edit on 4-11-2005 by waynos]



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 03:41 AM
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Cheers, Waynos, forgot that little factoid and didn't really take enough notice of your previous post.



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by skippytjc
Looks more like a twin engine F104 than anything else:


external image

Beefed up Leer Jet?



[edit on 3-11-2005 by skippytjc]

Mod Edit: Image Size – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 3/11/2005 by Mirthful Me]
The Bristol 188 is a cross between an F-104 and an SR-71 that are both from Lockheed.

It sometimes reminds me of PROJECT SUNTAN from the 1950s which is ALSO a Lockheed design!!!!!!!!!!.



posted on Nov, 5 2005 @ 03:14 AM
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Browno, you keep making these assertions? The Bristol 188 really was nothing to do with the F-104, SR-71 or Lockheed at all, you know. If you can show otherwise then please do, but you can't, because it wasn't. Simple as.

The long fuselage/short stubby wing planform was a standard generic layout that was commonly used to design supersonic aircraft in the 1950's and if you think the Bristol 188 looks like the F-104 you should see the Bristol 178 of 1952, that should really get your conspiracy radar pinging




[edit on 5-11-2005 by waynos]



posted on Nov, 5 2005 @ 09:24 AM
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Originally posted by waynos
Browno, you keep making these assertions? The Bristol 188 really was nothing to do with the F-104, SR-71 or Lockheed at all, you know. If you can show otherwise then please do, but you can't, because it wasn't. Simple as.

The long fuselage/short stubby wing planform was a standard generic layout that was commonly used to design supersonic aircraft in the 1950's and if you think the Bristol 188 looks like the F-104 you should see the Bristol 178 of 1952, that should really get your conspiracy radar pinging




[edit on 5-11-2005 by waynos]

Well ,whats this then!.
www.simonawhite.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk...



posted on Nov, 5 2005 @ 10:45 AM
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That is a Bristol 188, which you must surely have known. What do you mean?



posted on Nov, 5 2005 @ 06:29 PM
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Originally posted by waynos
That is a Bristol 188, which you must surely have known. What do you mean?


Becouse on that site even they say it resembles an SR-71.



posted on Nov, 6 2005 @ 05:05 PM
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Hmmm, 'resembles' is a very, very long way away from actually being linked though, isn't it?

After all, you could say that the F-102 and Mirage III 'resemble' each other but it means nothing .



posted on Nov, 7 2005 @ 01:15 PM
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hell i could say that every american airplane for 15 to 20 years after the avro arrow looked simalir to the arrow and that the americans stole designs etc from the canadians. which they didn't they just hired the teams from avro after the arrow was cancelled.



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