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Former Head of Abu Ghraib, Admits She Broke the Geneva Conventions

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posted on Nov, 2 2005 @ 11:01 AM
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Originally posted by Seekerof

Nuremberg Trials 101: never except blame, simply assert that you were following orders.

seekerof


Nuremberg Trials? Ever hear of Godwin's law? Just kidding. I agree with you. Even if Rumsfeld or someone else in our government approved it, soldiers have a moral duty to only obey lawful orders, and disregard ones contrary to the morals of the USA. She should go down, along with the ones who told her to do it.

Maybe she was more worried about retirement, but I'd be more worried about being able to live with myself and sleep at night. Those concerns don't seem to matter to our government officials.




posted on Nov, 2 2005 @ 12:18 PM
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Originally posted by Souljah
Check the The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY):



Subject-matter :

The Tribunal’s authority is to prosecute and try four clusters of offences:

*Grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Conventions.
*Violations of the laws or customs of war.
*Crimes against humanity.

Objectives:

*to bring to justice persons allegedly responsible for serious violations of international humanitarian law
*to render justice to the victims
*to deter further crimes

That's how the International Law works.

And when somebody Breaks it...

[edit on 2/11/05 by Souljah]

Thats just Yugoslavia , what about the rest of the world?
Who is a judge?
What paramisters set who can be one and who cant?



posted on Nov, 2 2005 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by devilwasp
Thats just Yugoslavia , what about the rest of the world?
Who is a judge?
What paramisters set who can be one and who cant?

Yes, it is just the Case of Yugoslavia Civil war, but is a Good Example, how a Fair Tribunal should look like.

And there is not just one Judge in a Tribunal:



President:
Theodor Meron (United States of America)

Vice-President:
Fausto Pocar (Italy)

Presiding Judges:
Patrick Lipton Robinson (Jamaica)
Carmel A. Agius (Malta)
Liu Daqun (China)

Judges:
Mohamed Shahabuddeen (Guyana)
Florence Ndepele Mwachande Mumba (Zambia)
Mehmet Güney (Turkey)
Amin El Mahdi (Egypt)
Alphonsus Martinus Maria Orie (Netherlands)
Wolfgang Schomburg (Germany)
O-gon Kwon (South Korea)
Jean-Claude Antonetti (France)
Kevin Parker (Australia)
Iain Bonomy (United Kingdom)
Andresia Vaz (Senegal)

Ad Litem Judges:
Joaquín Martín Canivell (Spain)
Vonimbolana Rasoazanany (Madagascar)
Bert Swart (Netherlands)
Christine Van Den Wyngaert (Belgium)
Krister Thelin (Sweden)
Albin Eser (Germany)
Hans Henrik Brydensholt (Denmark)
Claude Hanoteau (France)


The Chambers consist of 16 permanent judges and a maximum at any one time of nine ad litem judges. The 16 permanent judges are elected by the General Assembly of the United Nations for a term of four years. They can be re-elected.

The ad litem judges are drawn from a pool of 27 judges. They are also elected by the General Assembly of the United Nations for a term of four years, but they are not eligible for re-election. An ad litem judge can only serve at the ICTY following his/her appointment by the Secretary-General on the recommendation of the President of the Tribunal in order to sit on one or several specific trials for a period of up to three years.

ICTY

Suggested Read:

International Law

Geneva Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

[edit on 2/11/05 by Souljah]



posted on Nov, 2 2005 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by Souljah
Yes, it is just the Case of Yugoslavia Civil war, but is a Good Example, how a Fair Tribunal should look like.

Well thats an opinion.


And there is not just one Judge in a Tribunal:



President:
Theodor Meron (United States of America)

Vice-President:
Fausto Pocar (Italy)

Presiding Judges:
Patrick Lipton Robinson (Jamaica)
Carmel A. Agius (Malta)
Liu Daqun (China)

Judges:
Mohamed Shahabuddeen (Guyana)
Florence Ndepele Mwachande Mumba (Zambia)
Mehmet Güney (Turkey)
Amin El Mahdi (Egypt)
Alphonsus Martinus Maria Orie (Netherlands)
Wolfgang Schomburg (Germany)
O-gon Kwon (South Korea)
Jean-Claude Antonetti (France)
Kevin Parker (Australia)
Iain Bonomy (United Kingdom)
Andresia Vaz (Senegal)

Ad Litem Judges:
Joaquín Martín Canivell (Spain)
Vonimbolana Rasoazanany (Madagascar)
Bert Swart (Netherlands)
Christine Van Den Wyngaert (Belgium)
Krister Thelin (Sweden)
Albin Eser (Germany)
Hans Henrik Brydensholt (Denmark)
Claude Hanoteau (France)


The Chambers consist of 16 permanent judges and a maximum at any one time of nine ad litem judges. The 16 permanent judges are elected by the General Assembly of the United Nations for a term of four years. They can be re-elected.

The ad litem judges are drawn from a pool of 27 judges. They are also elected by the General Assembly of the United Nations for a term of four years, but they are not eligible for re-election. An ad litem judge can only serve at the ICTY following his/her appointment by the Secretary-General on the recommendation of the President of the Tribunal in order to sit on one or several specific trials for a period of up to three years.

ICTY

Suggested Read:

International Law

Geneva Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

[edit on 2/11/05 by Souljah]

I know that but who defines how "eligible" a judge is?



posted on Nov, 2 2005 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by devilwasp
I know that but who defines how "eligible" a judge is?

I don't know - there are 16 Judges from Around the World, and I am sure that each and every one of them has a Pretty good knowledge of the Law.

Do you think that ANY of the US Generals or the People in charge who gave the order to this Generals, will EVER see this Court of Justice?



posted on Nov, 2 2005 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by Souljah
I don't know - there are 16 Judges from Around the World, and I am sure that each and every one of them has a Pretty good knowledge of the Law.

Its not just about "knowledge of the law" , its also about knowledge about the military ,etc.


Do you think that ANY of the US Generals or the People in charge who gave the order to this Generals, will EVER see this Court of Justice?

Probably not, but they will grow old and die.



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 07:18 AM
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Originally posted by devilwasp
Its not just about "knowledge of the law" , its also about knowledge about the military ,etc.

That is not the JOB of the Army - that he JOB of the Judges.





Do you think that ANY of the US Generals or the People in charge who gave the order to this Generals, will EVER see this Court of Justice?

Probably not, but they will grow old and die.

And Where exactly is the JUSTICE in that?

I consider them Lucky, if they Grow old and die in their rocking chair.

How about those Innocent ones, that died in prison, choking on their own blood, that they vomited?

Hmmmmm...



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 08:44 AM
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Wasn't the US involved in the Yogosolvia civil war without UN approval? Didn't the US help Solvania without UN approval? I guess the way that entire region was under Slobbo rule was better than today. It's a shame, we should never got involved in helping your country find freedom.

[edit on 4-11-2005 by ferretman]



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 09:02 AM
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Originally posted by ferretman
Wasn't the US involved in the Yogosolvia civil war without UN approval? Didn't the US help Solvania with UN approval? I guess the way that entire region was under Slobbo rule was better than today. It's a shame, we should never got involved in helping your country find freedom.

Its Slovenia.

And the Yugoslavia Civil war raged in Bosnia, Croatia and Serbia.

It was mainly done by the UN and NATO.

Check this for Futher info:

en.wikipedia.org...

[edit on 4/11/05 by Souljah]



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 09:25 AM
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And who was there helping out without UN approval?!? The United States of America....that's who. If it wasn't for America's involvement you could be thrown in prison or tortured or just disappear under the 'old' regime.



posted on Nov, 4 2005 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by Souljah
That is not the JOB of the Army - that he JOB of the Judges.

No its NOT the job of ANY armed forces not just the army.
BUT, that being said they can't be rejected from the judge process.



And Where exactly is the JUSTICE in that?

There is none, its just the fact of life that the old will grow old and die, allowing newer minds and newer people into the thier place.
[qoute]
I consider them Lucky, if they Grow old and die in their rocking chair.

How about those Innocent ones, that died in prison, choking on their own blood, that they vomited?

Hmmmmm...
Can we change that?
Do you or I have a time machine?
No, what happened happened, we cant change that.
What we can do is plan for the future.



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