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The worst winter for the south

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posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 04:36 PM
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Snakes, birds, and bugs are taking cover because one of the worst winters is coming to the south any thoghts?




posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 04:38 PM
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why do you think that an increased amount of snakes birds and bugs means the worst winters of the south is coming? Could it possibly be that this is the maturing of a good mating season?

BlueAngel



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 04:45 PM
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well the snakes always do this but theydo this during the fall but its still in the summer which leads me to think that it going to be a white winter. On top of all this the trees Have already lost some of there leaves plus i think that were due for a bad winter.

[edit on 25-8-2005 by The Exiled One]

[edit on 25-8-2005 by The Exiled One]



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 04:48 PM
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Im not predicting diaster but its going to be bad



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:12 PM
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just a thought...any science or meteorology here?



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:28 PM
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The Southwest maintained an above average snowpack during the snow season with some areas (central Sierra Nevada, parts of Utah) over 125% of normal, even at the end of May. from NCDC



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:29 PM
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In the U.S., late season snow fell in Colorado during April, leaving well over 2 feet of snow in Denver and surrounding mountain areas (image right). The Great Lakes south to the southern Appalachians also received snowfall during the last week of April, leaving over a foot of accumulation in parts of Ohio. From the NCDC



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:29 PM
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Where did you get this information?

Maybe a link? I know they say the North East is going to be extremely cold.



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:31 PM
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posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:39 PM
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I noticed birds around here gathering early. Also noticed trees starting to turn early. There are reports of early frost in Canada and England. There have already been freezes in parts of the US. Last time we had a summer like this it was followed by a BAD winter. The year was 1995.



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:41 PM
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Wasn't there a bad ice storm that winter?



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:49 PM
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That was my first winter in Indiana since I was a kid. We had a snow storm starting but before the snow started to fall freezing rain came down first. And it came down hard. Then we got several inches of snow on top of that. After brushing the snow off my car I realized I could not see in the windows. Of course I couldn't get the key in the lock either. I had to bring out buckets of warm water to try and melt through the thick layer of ice. I did manage to get in my car and go but I spent the rest of the winter dealing with locks and doors freezing up.

Was that the year parts of Canada got hammered by a severe ice storm?



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:53 PM
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who here belives that the earth goes through a climate shift?



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 05:56 PM
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Because that could be a reason on why the planet is going through this weird weather.



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 06:03 PM
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The Exiled One...

If you have to do a one line post and have another thought to add it you can edit your previous post. I like to put "Edit" followed by my new short thought behind it. Just a suggestion.

It is about the right timing for a climate shift. We are about at the top of the cycle. History would indicate that we are due for a rapid drop in temperatures.



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 06:08 PM
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Would anyone like an iceage? Anyone? dindn't think so. So what do we do to stop it ? more global warming?any thoughts?



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 06:31 PM
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Tinkertoys and choked city streets...


Originally posted by Indy
Was that the year parts of Canada got hammered by a severe ice storm?


The worst storm in Canadian history!
(And we know something about winter!)



From January 5-10, 1998 the total water equivalent of precipitation, comprising mostly freezing rain and ice pellets and a bit of snow, exceeded 85 mm in Ottawa, 73 mm in Kingston, 108 in Cornwall and 100 mm in Montreal.

[that's 4 inches - of ice!]

The extent of the area affected by the ice was enormous.

How did the storm affect Canada:

-at least 25 deaths, many from hypothermia.

-about 900,000 households without power in Quebec; 100,000 in Ontario.

-about 100,000 people took refuge in shelters

-residents were urged to boil water for 24 to 48 hours.

-airlines and railway discouraged travel into the area

-14,000 troops (including 2,300 reservists) deployed to help with clean up, evacuation and security.

-millions of residents forced into mobile living, visiting family to shower and share a meal or moving in temporarily with a friend or into a shelter.

-prolonged freezing rain brought down millions of trees, 120,000 km of power lines and telephone cables, 130 major transmission towers each worth $100,000 and about 30,000 wooden utility poles costing $3000 each.

The damage in eastern Ontario and southern Quebec was so severe that major rebuilding, not repairing, of the electrical grid had to be undertaken. What it took human beings a half century to construct took nature a matter of hours to knock down. Environment Canada


From another link:



Some of the 5.2 million people affected by the Great Ice Storm of 1998 went without power for five weeks. The storm struck a 600-mile-long swath of terrain that covered parts of four Canadian provinces and four US states, in many areas doubling or tripling records for freezing rainfall. It was the most destructive recorded weather event in Canada's history, and produced the highest insurance loss of any Canadian disaster. It generated 840,000 claims, the most of any episode in the annals of insurance, and 20 percent more than Hurricane Andrew, the costliest natural disaster in US history. In Canada alone, roughly 2.6 million people - a fifth of the national labor force - were prevented from getting to work for several days. About 100,000 people took refuge in shelters. The official death toll was 45 - 28 fatalities in Canada, 17 in the US - but those numbers understate the ice storm's effects.

...the storm's biggest impact was, in a sense, not weather-related: It was the loss of electricity, which continued long after the storm passed. Ice accumulations caused the collapse of more than a thousand 260-feet-high transmission towers, each weighing 20 to 50 tons, and at least 35,000 wooden utility poles in Canada. More than 7,500 transformers stopped working, often blowing out with dazzling orange-and-yellow flashes or bursts of flame. Montreal's water supply, reliant on electricity for filtration, came close to running dry. ... the roads were impassable. Some parts of Montérégie, a region of 1.3 million people southeast of Montreal, went without power for so long that the area became known as "the Dark Triangle." link


Yeah... it was hell!


I've also noticed large bird flocks in the last weeks or so and thought it was early and certain species of trees have already lost some leaves.

.

edit: The Great Ice Storm of 1998


[edit on 8/25/2005 by Gools]



posted on Aug, 25 2005 @ 06:33 PM
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You can't stop it. Its nature. Its much bigger than we are. The atmosphere is far too large and contains too much energy for us to ever consider changing it. You can try to dry out a thunderstorm by dumping 747 loads of crystals into it but you'd only be marginally successful with a single storm. Forget trying to alter the climate.



posted on Dec, 10 2008 @ 03:10 PM
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take cover and i will not kill you because i had to much specal stuff to # my head right up haha




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