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Big diamonds made real fast

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posted on May, 17 2005 @ 03:03 AM
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www.scienceblog.com...



These are not real diamonds, but artifically produced ones that grow at a rate of around 100 micrometers an hour using as new CVD(Chemical Vapor Disposition) technique. That is blazing fast in this business and could bring down the cost of industrial diamonds to commodity prices soon.



The standard growth rate is 100 micrometers per hour for the Carnegie process, but growth rates in excess of 300 micrometers per hour have been reached, and 1 millimeter per hour may be possible. With the colorless diamond produced at ever higher growth rate and low cost, large blocks of diamond should be available for a variety of applications. "The diamond age is upon us," concluded Hemley.


The diamond age indeed


EDIT: More photos at this link

And the original press release

[edit on 17-5-2005 by sardion2000]




posted on May, 17 2005 @ 10:30 PM
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WOAH, I wish I could grow those

But I'm kind of confused, even though they are grown and artificial, are they still like real diamonds? I don't know how to get my question across, but are they exactly the same IE hardness, look, value, or are they a totally different mineral?

If they are exactly like the real ones, I'd have to say that's an amazing breakthrough, even though it will take down the value of all diamonds, but that might be a good thing for those of us who are not able to afford them.


[edit on 17-5-2005 by Omniscient]



posted on May, 17 2005 @ 10:58 PM
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Synthetic diamonds have been around for awhile now - the only news here appears to be that the process has been accellerated. They are chemically, visually, and tactilely identical to real diamonds except for one thing -- they are too perfect. Naturally occuring diamonds have microscopic flaws in them and these do not, and this detracts from their value.

In order to keep natural diamonds expensive, DeBeers has been trying to force synthesizers into microscopically labelling the diamonds.

Yellow diamonds are the most rare in nature, but we can easily produce them, to the point that if you see a yellow diamond and the owner isn't rich, it's probably synthetic.

Check out LifeGem. These guys take ashes from a loved one, extract the carbon from the ashes, and create diamonds from the carbon. Not quite the way I'd like to go.

EDIT I should add, DeBeers has been giving away machines that can tell if diamonds are synthetic by examining the flaws. They sell the machines to jewellers at very low prices. They basically shine light through the stones and examine the spectrum. No flaws = synthetic.

Zip


[edit on 17-5-2005 by Zipdot]



posted on May, 17 2005 @ 11:02 PM
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If it does show to be as hard and all of the other features of "real" diamonds then I doubt that we will ever use these for people to buy. Since the only reason that people like diamonds so much, is because of their rarety and for the fact that they are expensive. I am sure the "look" helps but I can concur with all of all of the guys out there thats theres no difference
I think the labeling idea is smart, but no one would care since people aren't going to carry around chain necklaces to see if your wife is wearing a "real" diamond. Although this technique could prove useful in like 150 years when all of our current possesions become antiques



posted on May, 17 2005 @ 11:05 PM
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Consumers buy synthetic diamonds, emeralds, rubies, etc. by the boatload these days. Synthetic diamonds are still pretty expensive, though, but not as expensive as comparable natural diamonds.

The fact that the process has accellerated is good news for industries that use diamonds commercially (in drilling appliances). The price will drop for these guys.

Zip

[edit on 17-5-2005 by Zipdot]



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 07:20 AM
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It's not only defect's that make the Diamonds "valuable" but also the Impurities.



The fact that the process has accellerated is good news for industries that use diamonds commercially (in drilling appliances). The price will drop for these guys


The Semiconductor industry is also drooling at the fact that they could be using commondity diamonds very soon.

[edit on 18-5-2005 by sardion2000]



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 09:06 AM
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also the armor people would love to be able to vaper depostit a layer of diamond between armor layers...



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 09:59 AM
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Originally posted by shadarlocoth
also the armor people would love to be able to vaper depostit a layer of diamond between armor layers...


I doubt it unless they can get rid of the brittleness of the substance. Carbon Nanotubes would be better methinks.



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 10:18 AM
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how do you think balistics glass works?


1. layer of plastic
2. layer of glass
3. layer of plastic
4. repeat

glass is very hard but brakes when bent easly but if you put the glas inside 2 layers of plastic the glass has no where to go so it does not brack nearly as easy. in the end it stops the round.

yes carbaon nano tubes would be very nice but pure tubes would cost alot more then CVD a layer of diamond. Take a layer of diamond and depostit it on a layer of aluminum then cover the outer layer with carbon fiber put a layer of dimond on top of that repeat tell reach the thick ness wanted.

also it could replace glass in balistics glass to form super bulit proff glass.



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 10:26 AM
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Okay I stand corrected
I just wonder which price will come down faster. I had not realized that you were talking about composit style, I had this image of a guy wearing a glittering diamond battle suit that shattered when the first bullet hit it lol. (Yes I have a very vivid imagination)

Now that you explained it abit, it makes perfect sense. Thanks



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 10:37 AM
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Originally posted by sardion2000
Okay I stand corrected
I just wonder which price will come down faster. I had not realized that you were talking about composit style, I had this image of a guy wearing a glittering diamond battle suit that shattered when the first bullet hit it lol. (Yes I have a very vivid imagination)

Now that you explained it abit, it makes perfect sense. Thanks


ya pure diamond armor would look cool as hell tell you got hit by anything hahah 8)



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 02:56 PM
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Thanks, guys, now I know what I'll be buying first thing when I become emperor.

That's Bling.

Zip



posted on May, 19 2005 @ 06:21 AM
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Single-crystal diamond block formed by
deposition on 6 [100] faces of a subs-
trate diamond, such as the 4 x 4 x 1.5
mm3 crystal shown below.



posted on May, 20 2005 @ 10:15 PM
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Imagine coating a CD or DVD with a layer of this diamond material.

Just what I need to keep the kids from scratching up my music and movies!


The potential of such material actually boggles the mind, I'm sure there are plenty of industries other than defense that could use diamond based materials. Shatter proof windows in homes and buildings come to mind. I'm sure there are plenty of other things.



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