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Masonic Rituals...worth spoiling?

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posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 10:27 PM
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Hello all.

Right now I suppose that I'm at that point where I'm wondering whether I should try to become a Mason. I will undoubtedly research them for the next few months and, depending on my lodge, won't even be able to become a Mason for another year and a half. That being said, in the little research I've done so far I've had the opportunity to read the rituals and such. Seeing as the Rituals are one of the most important parts about the Masons, is it worth reading them? If I were to decide to try to become a Mason, would reading these rituals be detrimental to my experience? I just don't want to ruin what could be a huge decision for myself. Anybody that has an opinion is welcome to post it. Thanks for the time


nufan




posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by nmuxfpaxn
Hello all.

Right now I suppose that I'm at that point where I'm wondering whether I should try to become a Mason. I will undoubtedly research them for the next few months and, depending on my lodge, won't even be able to become a Mason for another year and a half. That being said, in the little research I've done so far I've had the opportunity to read the rituals and such. Seeing as the Rituals are one of the most important parts about the Masons, is it worth reading them? If I were to decide to try to become a Mason, would reading these rituals be detrimental to my experience? I just don't want to ruin what could be a huge decision for myself. Anybody that has an opinion is welcome to post it. Thanks for the time


nufan


DON'T.

Even though the rituals that are on the internet are almost nothing like the rituals I have experienced (they do very from state to state and country to country), it is best to go into lodge with a mind and heart free and clear of any expectations and, possibly, misconceptions you might have of what you are about to experience. You will have plenty of time afcterwards to analyze and decopnstruct your experiences, no need to do that now.

You can be safe in knowing that nothing you experience will "interfere with the duty you owe to God, your neighbor, or yourself", and you will not be forced to do anything derogatory, embarrassing, or anything that makes you uncomfortable.

I know your in a college frat, but this is nothing like that. These are solemn rituals, full of meaning and symbolism, and millions of men have gone through them before you. Trust those millions of voices and dont scratch an itch that will make you regret it later.


[edit on 23-3-2005 by sebatwerk]



posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 11:25 PM
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But you will have to admit you are presently in darkness, and have a trouser leg rolled up, and a knife held to your chest, but its OK, cuz your blindfolded.

So yeah, DON'T.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 12:56 AM
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I suppose that I'm not sure how to take that second statement, but as for me already being in a fraternity, yup. But the way you describe the rituals seems on par with what I've been through thus far. I'm not saying that the two are the same in any way, except for the fact that the ceremony and ritual that i've been through for my fraternity was very solemn and serious. None of it involved the "fratty" things that people seem to think of (IE: Alcohol being involved in ANY part of it). Because I feel that the two are similar enough to compare, I've decided not to read any of it because if I would have known what the ceremonies and rituals were before I went through them in my fraternity, it wouldn't have meant nearly as much. It wouldn't have been such an amazing ordeal.

Has anyone gone through the rituals while knowing what they were going to be? I'm interested to know if it was still an amazing ordeal or not?

Cheers,
nufan


Cug

posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 05:43 AM
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I'm intersted in joining another fraternal organization, and truthfully I wish I didn't read a version of their initiation rituals. Luckily I read them a long time ago and I don't remember what parts went with what degree so I hope I can get a somewhat same effect as one who went in without any knowledge of them.

For what it's worth, I have heard from others that have read the same book and they said the rituals were still effective but they truly wish they had never read the book.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 06:17 AM
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Don't

If I had read the ritual before going through the Entered Apprentice degree the entire effect would have been ruined. I can only assume the same is true for the Fellow Craft and Master Mason degrees as well.

[edit on 24-3-2005 by Helios Barca]



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 08:09 AM
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Don't, I mean its perfectly normal to agree to be oath bound by something before you know what it is right?
Then again maybe you want to read this instead.
www.freemasonry101.org.uk...

ohhh...and by the way this IS a mind control cult you are joining, and they most likely WILL drug you repeatedly as part of your initiation just as they did to me.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 08:15 AM
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Sorry just in case you really do go through with it I was wondering if you could do one thing for me?
When it gets to the bit where they ask you "Why do you wish to join us?"
Tell the truth ("like ....errr I figured you guys can get me a job...like?)
rather than ummming and ahhhhing until someone whispers "To Seek Light In Masonry" in your ear.

They really mean it when they ask, if you just say what they tell you to say then that more or less means you are willing to do anything because you have NO reason to join.

They're not going to stop you from joining if you do this...but you will probably be the first one in history to do any other!



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 08:36 AM
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Originally posted by nmuxfpaxn
Hello all.

Right now I suppose that I'm at that point where I'm wondering whether I should try to become a Mason. I will undoubtedly research them for the next few months and, depending on my lodge, won't even be able to become a Mason for another year and a half. That being said, in the little research I've done so far I've had the opportunity to read the rituals and such. Seeing as the Rituals are one of the most important parts about the Masons, is it worth reading them? If I were to decide to try to become a Mason, would reading these rituals be detrimental to my experience? I just don't want to ruin what could be a huge decision for myself. Anybody that has an opinion is welcome to post it. Thanks for the time


nufan


nmuxfpaxn,

Before I became a Mason I was aware of some of the so-called expose's that were available purporting to expose the rituals. I never read them before joining the Symbolic Lodge (First Three Degrees) and am glad I didn't. However I wish I'd read *something* before doing so and I highly recommend a book by the late Brother Allen E. Roberts called "The Craft and It's Symbols" It's available through various on-line book sellers and doesn't cost much. It's truly worthwhile.

The rituals available on line vary from really accurate (for some jurisdictions) to really ....well strange. I recently found what called itself the 18th Degree of the Scottish Rite and it wasn't the 18th Degree of ANYTHING (there are some sick people out there who'll post *anything) In fact some are on this forum.

Bear in mind what people call "the" Masonic Ritual varies (as Sebatwerk said) from State to State and from country to country. The basics are the same, but the actual ceremony is incredibly different. I'm a collector of rituals (specializing in Masonic rituals) and I have DOZENS of variants of the first three degrees alone! So if you were to read a Symbolic Lodge ritual before being initiated, it would likely be quite different from what you'll actually experience.

That being said, your college fraternity experience will be a big help. Most college fraternities display a great deal of Masonic influence. A couple of the local fraternities where I live (Cape Girardeau, MO) use the Masonic Temple for their initiations. Not only do they use the building, they borrow some of the paraphernalia, costumes, etc. My own college fraternity had a great deal of Masonic influence in its ritual. So much so that when I joined Masonry I stopped several times and thought, "Hmm. That sounds familiar."

Oh, and I see the trolls have started feeding on this thread already, so a word about that. Using your college fraternity as an example, did you ever have anyone who wanted to join but wasn't given a bid or was black-balled? ...then he went around bad mouthing your fraternity on campus? That's a lot like the trolls here.


Regards



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 11:32 AM
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Heh, definitely can relate to that. I suppose that if you're disappointed with something, some people tend to try and ruin it for others or bad mouth it as much as they can. From what I've researched so far, many of the ideals that Masons have are very similar to what I've been taught. I'm still trying to wrap my head around how brotherhood can exist so strongly without some sort of pledge period (let me specify before someone takes that out of context. Not all pledge periods consist of being forced to drink alcohol and doing humiliating acts...mine sure as hell wasn't). That period of being with my pledge brothers made me become so much closer to them, and I'm wondering if the Masons achieve such brotherhood and how? Is it simply from going through rituals together, being together at the lodge, etc?

Cheers,
nufan



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 01:15 PM
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Originally posted by nmuxfpaxn
Heh, definitely can relate to that. I suppose that if you're disappointed with something, some people tend to try and ruin it for others or bad mouth it as much as they can. From what I've researched so far, many of the ideals that Masons have are very similar to what I've been taught. I'm still trying to wrap my head around how brotherhood can exist so strongly without some sort of pledge period (let me specify before someone takes that out of context. Not all pledge periods consist of being forced to drink alcohol and doing humiliating acts...mine sure as hell wasn't). That period of being with my pledge brothers made me become so much closer to them, and I'm wondering if the Masons achieve such brotherhood and how? Is it simply from going through rituals together, being together at the lodge, etc?

Cheers,
nufan


Totally aside from the probably self-induced, paranoid fantasies of folks like mrnecros, the fact might be that youare not in a any pledge period, simply because you are dealing with mature people who feel that your oath, or word is your bond. Can't imagine that anyone goes to a real masonic meeting and becomes involved in drug induced hysteria and paranoia ... And keeps on going back.

I know a number of Masons, and my late Uncle was a Mason. Fine people. I'm sure that there are folks in there who are self serving as well as those who are in there with the original intent of brotherhood. But, whatever ... My uncle was certainly no drug head, and certainly was not involved in any world domination effort.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 03:30 PM
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I understand the fact that they definitely can take people at their word, my question is whether or not the bond of brotherhood is honestly as strong as I have felt. Meaning, how can simply going through one single ritual (or 3, I suppose) bring you closer to those around you except to share a common bond. My question now, I suppose, is how, exactly, do Masons form such bonds. Does it come through having a few drinks with each other on a regular basis or do Masons hold regular events to build such brotherhood?

Cheers,
nufan



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by nmuxfpaxn
I understand the fact that they definitely can take people at their word, my question is whether or not the bond of brotherhood is honestly as strong as I have felt. Meaning, how can simply going through one single ritual (or 3, I suppose) bring you closer to those around you except to share a common bond. My question now, I suppose, is how, exactly, do Masons form such bonds. Does it come through having a few drinks with each other on a regular basis or do Masons hold regular events to build such brotherhood?

Cheers,
nufan


nufan,

That's a great question and one that's almost impossible to explain. I wondered the same thing, as I was really close to my college fraternity brothers, but the bond felt in Masonry is incredible. The trust and respect we have for one another is unexplainable. If you can find a copy of it, there's a video called "Unseen Journey" that's WELL worth seeing. I don't know if it's still being produced, but if you can find it, it'll be worth your viewing.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 04:46 PM
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I will definitely look into that. I hate always comparing this fraternity to that fraternity, but when it's really all that you know, there's nothing else to compare it to. I hope I'm not coming off as extremely ignorant in saying so, however, I suppose that when it comes to this topic I am truly ignorant, so we'll see what happens.

Cheers,
nufan



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by nmuxfpaxn
I will definitely look into that. I hate always comparing this fraternity to that fraternity, but when it's really all that you know, there's nothing else to compare it to. I hope I'm not coming off as extremely ignorant in saying so, however, I suppose that when it comes to this topic I am truly ignorant, so we'll see what happens.


WHY do you insist on comparing it to ANYTHING?



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 06:41 PM
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It just helps to have something similar to compare it to for the sake of understanding it a little better. If it is close enough to be compared to then I can have a little better idea of what it will be about, and whether or not it's something I want to continue looking into. If I had hated my previous experience in a fraternity (which definitely isn't the case) then knowing that the two are similar will allow me to walk away from this without any qualms, however if I enjoy my fraternity experience, then if this is very similar then it's just adding more fuel to the fire. It will make me seek to understand it all the more. That'd be why I insist upon comparing it to something.

Cheers,
nufan



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by nmuxfpaxn
It just helps to have something similar to compare it to for the sake of understanding it a little better. If it is close enough to be compared to then I can have a little better idea of what it will be about, and whether or not it's something I want to continue looking into. If I had hated my previous experience in a fraternity (which definitely isn't the case) then knowing that the two are similar will allow me to walk away from this without any qualms, however if I enjoy my fraternity experience, then if this is very similar then it's just adding more fuel to the fire. It will make me seek to understand it all the more. That'd be why I insist upon comparing it to something.


Well that's your problem then. Comparisons will only serve to give you pre-conceptions about it. I suggest you throw out any preconceptions and any comparisons, and instead research it with a clean slate. masonry cannot be compared to anything else because it is unlike anything else, trust us when we tell you this. There's plenty of innformation available out there so that you do not have to rely on comparisons to find out what it's all about.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 09:18 PM
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I wasn't trying to rely on comparisons alone, but on comparisons as a way in which to either get excited about it, be turned away from it, or frankly, get no result at all. Like you're saying, it's not something that can be compared to so now I have my answer and can look in other places, however, if they were to be comparable, that would be all the better. It was merely one form of research I suppose. Whenever I conduct any research I always start with what I know, and because both are fraternities, I decided to start there, however, now that I do know they aren't the same, I can continue into the unknown. It was never something upon which I would base my entire decision because, even at the college level, most fraternities have differences, and that's why I was wondering what the differences would be, but like I said, it doesn't much matter anymore because they are not comparable
World Wide Web...here I come!


I would like to say that while I can be a bit stubborn at times, I don't want that to be taken for unappreciation for all of the help I have recieved. I honestly do appreciate it and, again, apologize for just being the way that I am. If I do ever piss you off, just lemme know



Cheers,
nufan



posted on Mar, 25 2005 @ 09:25 AM
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Originally posted by nmuxfpaxn
My question now, I suppose, is how, exactly, do Masons form such bonds. Does it come through having a few drinks with each other on a regular basis or do Masons hold regular events to build such brotherhood?


In my opinion, the bond comes through, first of all, each member having experienced the ceremonial. Every Mason has been initiated into the fraternity in more or less the exact same way for centuries, and this experience builds a strong bond of fellowship.

Secondly, the bond is strengthened by attending Lodge on a regular basis, and developing friendships with the other members.



posted on Mar, 25 2005 @ 09:36 AM
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I managed to get ahold of an actual freemasonary ritual book that someone in New Jersey used to practice freemasonary, one portion of the book was in this strange coded text that I couldn't understand. If I rememmber clearly the book had a section where the opening ritual was in plain text, step by step..



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