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Hospitals and Doctors Lag Behind Information Age (from ATSNN)

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posted on Mar, 15 2005 @ 07:49 PM
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A new study made the fact that health care lags behind the information age very clear. This study was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and it is very telling. The study condluded that the use of electronic records is far behind than the use of electronic records in the economy.
 



www.livescience.com
Health care lags behind the information age, a new study found. Fewer than a third of hospitals and only 17 percent of doctors' offices check electronic records prior to treating patients or prescribing medicine.

Only 8 percent of physicians use a computerized physician order entry system. The setup, advocated by government officials, is designed to compare orders for drugs and diagnostic tests against dosing standards and a patient's medical records. The computerized system checks for allergies or drug interactions, and warns of potential patient problems.

"The use of electronic records in health care lags far behind the computerization of information in other sectors of the economy," the report concludes.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I feel that this is a very serious problem that needs to be corrected soon. Computers are used as a tool to help humans in many ways. I feel that the computer should definitely be used in hospitals and by doctors in order to help the patients. Compared to the economy, the use of electronic records in health care is not doing well at all. This is not a matter to be taken lightly.

Related News Links:
www.livescience.com

[edit on 15-3-2005 by they see ALL]




posted on Mar, 15 2005 @ 08:13 PM
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(Why is this story getting shot down but 'al sharpton says something about rappers' is a full news story?)

Man, thats incredible. At first I thought they were saying 'hospitals aren't as advanced as we'd like them to be'. But they're actually saying that businesses, where the only concern is merely making profit, has been more innovative and active.

This is interesting for me because I was recently reading about how people that value achievement tend to become successful business people. And, similarly, entire cultures that have high acheivement values, (apparently as tested thru the fables and fairy tales they tell their kids) are also highly successful cultures, as opposed to unsuccesful marginalized, powerless, third world, cutlures.

Additionally, this is interesting because a person in a culture who picks up a 'new' thing, whether its a tool or a technique, is called an 'entrepeneur'. Originally it was because it was business people that have this interest, but later it was extended to non economic traits.

So I find this interesting in this context, because its the businesses that are modernizing and adapting the best, and they're probably doing so more efficiently and cost effectively than anyone else is. Yet their the motive is simply profit, whereas in hospitals, well, one of the greatest human motives is supposedly at work.

And its ineffective.



posted on Mar, 15 2005 @ 08:19 PM
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I find it can actually be an invasion of privacy...my ex husband went to get some testing done for tuberculosis and the doctor punched in some buttons and told my husband the dates he had been overseas.

Some quack labels you a hypochondriac and there goes your chance for good medical treatment ever.

Its a fine balance between information sharing and privacy

and the more stuff and reports like this are made, the tinier and tinier our freedom and privacy gets.



posted on Mar, 15 2005 @ 08:21 PM
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well with the errors, power outages, crashes,etc, i dont think doing everything on computer is a good idea..



posted on Mar, 15 2005 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
(Why is this story getting shot down but 'al sharpton says something about rappers' is a full news story?)

Man, thats incredible. At first I thought they were saying 'hospitals aren't as advanced as we'd like them to be'. But they're actually saying that businesses, where the only concern is merely making profit, has been more innovative and active.

This is interesting for me because I was recently reading about how people that value achievement tend to become successful business people. And, similarly, entire cultures that have high acheivement values, (apparently as tested thru the fables and fairy tales they tell their kids) are also highly successful cultures, as opposed to unsuccesful marginalized, powerless, third world, cutlures.

Additionally, this is interesting because a person in a culture who picks up a 'new' thing, whether its a tool or a technique, is called an 'entrepeneur'. Originally it was because it was business people that have this interest, but later it was extended to non economic traits.

So I find this interesting in this context, because its the businesses that are modernizing and adapting the best, and they're probably doing so more efficiently and cost effectively than anyone else is. Yet their the motive is simply profit, whereas in hospitals, well, one of the greatest human motives is supposedly at work.

And its ineffective.


thanks for the nice comment...

this is big news and i am happy that members are looking at this thread...





posted on Mar, 16 2005 @ 08:16 AM
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Just curious, how are you going to pay for the new systems? Its a serious question. Everybody in the HC field would like more computer based record keepeing, but am I willing to forgo cost of living raises for it? Nope!



posted on Mar, 16 2005 @ 08:33 AM
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This is an important topic - thanks theyseeAll.

...The push for universal health records has been going on a while, but it IS fraught with great potential for abuse, as Mayet points out. ...It also ties in with several other legislative pushes, including:

1. The move for mandatory mental health testing in schools;

www.abovetopsecret.com...


2. The move to test voters for "mental competency."

In October 2004, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published a recommendation saying voters should take a "standardized mental competency test" - those who fail will lose their right to vote."

www.abovetopsecret.com...



.....It may be that those blocking computerized medical "efficiency" are actually protecting our freedoms.



posted on Mar, 16 2005 @ 01:37 PM
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thanks soficrow...

i hope this problem gets corrected soon...





posted on Mar, 16 2005 @ 01:55 PM
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Originally posted by FredT
Just curious, how are you going to pay for the new systems?

Good point. I say, give hospitals much more funding.



posted on Mar, 16 2005 @ 01:58 PM
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give them more funding than the military (for now)...

if we (the US) has the most advanced military in the world, then there is no need to get "more advanced" by using major funds...

this is just my way of thinking...





posted on Mar, 16 2005 @ 02:51 PM
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Well yes and no. Hospitals have been computerized for years. Medicare data has been flowing to the feds in electronic format since before the PC was around. Cedars-Sinai in LA has more mips in their data center than most supercomputer sites have, just all different systems.... Now, there are two big issues here:

1. There is no federally mandated standard for an EMR (electronic medical record). There are proposals out there but no standard.

2. Because of 1 there is no single database that can be queried for a patient's history. You live in DC and come to California for a trip and need care - see the problem..??

A third issue is that all the electronic crap does little to actually improve patient care. It's a huge cost and if it does not improve patient care, what's the point? The drug interaction stuff is nifty and many hospitals actually have that today, it's just not standardized. Many hospitals have flat screens by every bed and can call up lab tests and view imaging right at the bedside. I believe 17% as it's only the big, fancy hospitals that can afford this stuff. I think Cedars blew ~$40 Million on their bedside patient care system..!!

Private clinicians, well if there were national standards and databases then things will change there. I do know Cedars has access for all of their referring MD's tied into their main systems. Also, only docs since the 80's are comfortable with tech and computers - all the people that came thru the system in the 50-70's are clueless about tech....



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