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Soul and spirit

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posted on Aug, 19 2020 @ 11:43 AM
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1Th 5:23 ¶ And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and [I pray God] your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.




posted on Aug, 19 2020 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn
Could you handle being blameless?

If someone told people that you don't have to feel bad and guilty about anything, people would say it is bad to not feel bad!!

And then they would crucify the one who said it...lol.
edit on 19-8-2020 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2020 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn
You are blameless.....you never did anything wrong.....and you never did anything right either.



posted on Aug, 19 2020 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: Itisnowagain

I am imputed Christ's righteousness.

Rom 4:20-24 He staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief; but was strong in faith, giving glory to God;
21 And being fully persuaded that, what he had promised, he was able also to perform.
22 And therefore it was imputed to him for righteousness.
23 ¶ Now it was not written for his sake alone, that it was imputed to him;
24 But for us also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead;
God looks at me as if I did nothing wrong because I believed on his son who died for my sins upon the cross, Paid the price and went to hell in my place and then rose from the dead on the third day.

Rom 10:9 That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
10 For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
11 For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
Not being ashamed because I am no longer guilty of my sin because Christ bore it in his own body on the tree for me

1Pet 2:24 Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.
I will stand before God without guilt because of his sons work on the cross for all men. It is just that not all men will believe on him for salvation.

1Cor 15:3 For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures;
4 And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:
I have done plenty wrong and I was bound for hell then I heard this gospel and believed on him and God saved me and gave me his righteousness, justified my faith when he rose him from the dead

Roms 4:25 Who was delivered for our offences, and was raised again for our justification.
What assurance, what glory, what a Saviour. Hallelujah!!!!!


edit on 8/19/2020 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2020 @ 03:54 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn
You are not only blameless for wrong doings......but also for right doings!

Do you agree?



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: Itisnowagain

Then why are we promised a reward?



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn
What reward?

Are you saying that you disagree with 'you are blameless for right doings'?



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: Itisnowagain

If you don't know the promise of rewards then you don't know the Bible.



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn
I know what it says about pride.

I consider that if one is blameless, that it is not just about guilt...but pride also.

edit on 22-8-2020 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: Itisnowagain

I had no idea you were talking about pride up until now you hadn't mentioned it. Now you are way off from what we were discussing.



posted on Aug, 27 2020 @ 01:59 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
...
The word normally translated as “soul” in the Old Testament is NEPHESH. The key passage here is the moment when God breathed life into Adam and Adam became a living NEPHESH (Genesis ch2 v7). The NEPHESH is the whole person. In effect, NEPHESH means the fact that the body is living and not lifeless, ...
...
So we can think of the PSYCHE as the natural human mind, not guided by God.

Do you believe that the Hebrew word translated as “soul” has a different meaning than the Greek word translated as “soul”? Those are different definitions or meanings you gave there. One says "NEPHESH = the whole person" the other is akin to 'PSYCHE = the natural human mind, not guided by God'.

“The Hebrew term for ‘soul’ (nefesh, that which breathes) was used by Moses . . . , signifying an ‘animated being’ and applicable equally to nonhuman beings. . . . New Testament usage of psychē (‘soul’) was comparable to nefesh.”—The New Encyclopædia Britannica (1976), Macropædia, Vol. 15, p. 152.

As stated at Genesis 2:7, man “came to be a living soul”; hence man was a soul, he did not have a soul (like a "natural human mind") as something immaterial, invisible, and intangible residing inside him. The apostle Paul shows that the Christian teaching did not differ from the earlier Hebrew teaching, for he quotes Genesis 2:7 in saying: “It is even so written: ‘The first man Adam became a living soul [psy·khenʹ zoʹsan].’ . . . The first man is out of the earth and made of dust.”​—1Co 15:45-47.

Neʹphesh evidently comes from a root meaning “breathe” and in a literal sense neʹphesh could be rendered as “a breather.” Koehler and Baumgartner’s Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros (Leiden, 1958, p. 627) defines it as: “the breathing substance, making man a[nd] animal living beings Gn 1, 20, the soul (strictly distinct from the greek notion of soul) the seat of which is the blood Gn 9, 4f Lv 17, 11 Dt 12, 23: (249 X) . . . soul = living being, individual, person.”

Rev. 16:3: “It became blood as of a dead man, and every living soul* died, yes, the things in the sea.” (Thus the Christian Greek Scriptures also show animals to be souls.) (*In Greek the word here is psy·kheʹ. KJ, AS, and Dy render it “soul.” Some translators use the term “creature” or “thing.”)

It is essential to let the Scriptures speak for themselves, showing what the inspired writers meant by their use of the term psy·kheʹ, as well as by neʹphesh. Neʹphesh occurs 754 times in the Masoretic text of the Hebrew Scriptures, while psy·kheʹ appears by itself 102 times in the Westcott and Hort text of the Christian Greek Scriptures, giving a total of 856 occurrences. (See NW appendix, p. 1573.) This frequency of occurrence makes possible a clear concept of the sense that these terms conveyed to the minds of the inspired Bible writers and the sense their writings should convey to our mind. An examination shows that, while the sense of these terms is broad, with different shades of meaning, among the Bible writers there was no inconsistency, confusion, or disharmony as to man’s nature, as existed among the Grecian philosophers of the so-called Classical Period.

Earth’s First Souls. The initial occurrences of neʹphesh are found at Genesis 1:20-23. On the fifth creative “day” God said: “‘Let the waters swarm forth a swarm of living souls [neʹphesh] and let flying creatures fly over the earth . . .’ And God proceeded to create the great sea monsters and every living soul [neʹphesh] that moves about, which the waters swarmed forth according to their kinds, and every winged flying creature according to its kind.” Similarly on the sixth creative “day” neʹphesh is applied to the “domestic animal and moving animal and wild beast of the earth” as “living souls.”​—Ge 1:24.

After man’s creation, God’s instruction to him again used the term neʹphesh with regard to the animal creation, “everything moving upon the earth in which there is life as a soul [literally, in which there is living soul (neʹphesh)].” (Ge 1:30) Other examples of animals being so designated are found at Genesis 2:19; 9:10-16; Leviticus 11:10, 46; 24:18; Numbers 31:28; Ezekiel 47:9. Notably, the Christian Greek Scriptures coincide in applying the Greek psy·kheʹ to animals, as at Revelation 8:9; 16:3, where it is used of creatures in the sea.

Thus, the Scriptures clearly show that neʹphesh and psy·kheʹ are used to designate the animal creation lower than man. The same terms apply to man.

The Human Soul. Precisely the same Hebrew phrase used of the animal creation, namely, neʹphesh chai·yahʹ (living soul), is applied to Adam, when, after God formed man out of dust from the ground and blew into his nostrils the breath of life, “the man came to be a living soul.” (Ge 2:7) Man was distinct from the animal creation, but that distinction was not because he was a neʹphesh (soul) and they were not. Rather, the record shows that it was because man alone was created “in God’s image.” (Ge 1:26, 27) He was created with moral qualities like those of God, with power and wisdom far superior to the animals; hence he could have in subjection all the lower forms of creature life. (Ge 1:26, 28)

...
So, too, the “spirit” (Heb., ruʹach; Gr., pneuʹma), or life-force, of man is not distinct from the life-force in animals, as is shown by Ecclesiastes 3:19-21, which states that “they all have but one spirit [weruʹach].”
...
The Genesis account shows that a living soul results from the combination of the earthly body with the breath of life. The expression “breath of the force of life [literally, breath of the spirit, or active force (ruʹach), of life]” (Ge 7:22) indicates that it is by breathing air (with its oxygen) that the life-force, or “spirit,” in all creatures, man and animals, is sustained. This life-force is found in every cell of the creature’s body, as is discussed under LIFE; SPIRIT.

Since the term neʹphesh refers to the creature itself, we should expect to find the normal physical functions or characteristics of fleshly creatures attributed to it. This is exactly the case. Neʹphesh (soul) is spoken of as eating flesh, fat, blood, or similar material things (Le 7:18, 20, 25, 27; 17:10, 12, 15; De 23:24); being hungry for or craving food and drink (De 12:15, 20, 21; Ps 107:9; Pr 19:15; 27:7; Isa 29:8; 32:6; Mic 7:1); being made fat (Pr 11:25); fasting (Ps 35:13); touching unclean things, such as a dead body (Le 5:2; 7:21; 17:15; 22:6; Nu 19:13); being ‘seized as a pledge’ or being ‘kidnapped’ (De 24:6, 7); doing work (Le 23:30); being refreshed by cold water when tired (Pr 25:25); being purchased (Le 22:11; Eze 27:13); being given as a vow offering (Le 27:2); being put in irons (Ps 105:18); being sleepless (Ps 119:28); and struggling for breath (Jer 15:9).

It may be noted that in many texts reference is made to “my soul,” “his [or her] soul,” “your soul,” and so forth. This is because neʹphesh and psy·kheʹ can mean one’s own self as a soul. The sense of the term can therefore often be expressed in English by use of personal pronouns. Thus Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros (p. 627) shows that “my neʹphesh” means “I” (Ge 27:4, 25; Isa 1:14); “your [singular] neʹphesh” means “thou” or “you” (Ge 27:19, 31; Isa 43:4; 51:23); “his neʹphesh” means “he, himself” (Nu 30:2; Isa 53:10); “her neʹphesh” means “she, herself” (Nu 30:5-12), and so forth.

The Greek term psy·kheʹ is used similarly. Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (1981, Vol. 4, p. 54) says it may be used as “the equivalent of the personal pronoun, used for emphasis and effect:​—1st person, John 10:24 (‘us’); Heb. 10:38; cp. [compare] Gen. 12:13; Num. 23:10; Jud. 16:30; Ps. 120:2 (‘me’); 2nd person, 2 Cor. 12:15; Heb. 13:17,” and so forth.

Represents life as a creature. Both neʹphesh and psy·kheʹ are also used to mean life​—not merely as an abstract force or principle—​but life as a creature, human or animal.
...

Source: Soul (Insight on the Scriptures)



posted on Aug, 27 2020 @ 02:26 AM
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So in summary:

Soul

Definition: In the Bible, “soul” is translated from the Hebrew neʹphesh and the Greek psy·kheʹ. Bible usage shows the soul to be a person or an animal or the life that a person or an animal enjoys. To many persons, however, “soul” means the immaterial or spirit part of a human being that survives the death of the physical body. Others understand it to be the principle of life. But these latter views are not Bible teachings.

Source: Soul (Reasoning From the Scriptures)

Spirit

Definition: The Hebrew word ruʹach and the Greek pneuʹma, which are often translated “spirit,” have a number of meanings. All of them refer to that which is invisible to human sight and which gives evidence of force in motion. The Hebrew and Greek words are used with reference to (1) wind, (2) the active life-force in earthly creatures, (3) the impelling force that issues from a person’s figurative heart and that causes him to say and do things in a certain way, (4) inspired utterances originating with an invisible source, (5) spirit persons, and (6) God’s active force, or holy spirit. ...

Source: Spirit (Reasoning From the Scriptures)

Life

Definition: An active condition that distinguishes plants, animals, humans, and spirit beings from inanimate objects. Physical living things generally have the capabilities of growth, metabolism, response to external stimuli, and reproduction. Vegetation has active life but not life as a sense-possessing soul. In earthly souls, animal and human, there are both active life-force to animate them and breath to sustain that life-force.

Life in the fullest sense, as applied to intelligent persons, is perfect existence with the right to it. The human soul is not immortal. But faithful servants of God have the prospect of everlasting life in perfection—on earth for many, in heaven for a “little flock” as heirs of the Kingdom of God. Upon their resurrection to spirit life, members of the Kingdom class are also granted immortality, a quality of life that does not need to be sustained by any created thing.

Source: Life (Reasoning From the Scriptures)



posted on Aug, 27 2020 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: glend

In the 2nd letter of John, he warns for deceivers and antichrists who have gone forth into the world, who do not confess Jesus Christ as coming in the flesh. He that pushes ahead beyond the teaching of Christ does not have God, but he that remains in this teaching “has both the Father and the Son.” (verse 7,9)

It appears that in John’s day, as in modern times, there were some who were not content to stay with the plain, simple teachings of Christ. They wanted something more, something that would tickle their ego, something that would exalt them and put them in a class with worldly philosophers, and they were willing to contaminate and divide the Christian congregation in order to gain their selfish ends.

It is from these types that we get the kind of philosophies (or theosophies) about soul, spirit, life and "the ego-mind" that conflict with the things I mentioned in my previous 2 comments (minus the term you were talking about, which is a bit off-topic, unless it was building on DISRAELI's suggested meaning for "PSYCHE as the natural human mind, not guided by God." Something he got to by way of Greek philosophy and the way the Grecian philosophers of the so-called Classical Period connected psy·kheʹ to the concept of the mind, as demonstrated when he felt the need to point out "PSYCHE is at the root of “psychology”, and other words coined by the modern mind-sciences." That's not how the word is used by the Bible writers, who are clear about what they mean with the words they use, as explained in my first comment in this thread).

I probably should point out the following though:

Mind (Insight on the Scriptures)

... In the Hebrew Scriptures, “mind” appears in some versions as a rendering of the Hebrew words that are, literally and properly, “heart,” “soul,” and “spirit.”​—Compare De 4:39, ftn; 2Ki 9:15, Ro; Eze 20:32, JB; see HEART.

But doing that can be quite confusing and it's not all that accurate. Like the way the KJ renders 2Ki 9:15 as “And Jehu said, If it be your minds,” while the NKJV renders it “And Jehu said, “If you are so minded,”. A more accurate rendering would be (NW):

“Jeʹhu now said: “If you agree,*” [*: Or “your soul agrees.”]

Remember what I quoted in my first comment in this thread towards the end regarding the expression “your soul”:

...
It may be noted that in many texts reference is made to “my soul,” “his [or her] soul,” “your soul,” and so forth. This is because neʹphesh and psy·kheʹ can mean one’s own self as a soul. The sense of the term can therefore often be expressed in English by use of personal pronouns. Thus Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti Libros (p. 627) shows that “my neʹphesh” means “I” (Ge 27:4, 25; Isa 1:14); “your [singular] neʹphesh” means “thou” or “you” (Ge 27:19, 31; Isa 43:4; 51:23); “his neʹphesh” means “he, himself” (Nu 30:2; Isa 53:10); “her neʹphesh” means “she, herself” (Nu 30:5-12), and so forth.

The Greek term psy·kheʹ is used similarly. Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (1981, Vol. 4, p. 54) says it may be used as “the equivalent of the personal pronoun, used for emphasis and effect:​—1st person, John 10:24 (‘us’); Heb. 10:38; cp. [compare] Gen. 12:13; Num. 23:10; Jud. 16:30; Ps. 120:2 (‘me’); 2nd person, 2 Cor. 12:15; Heb. 13:17,” and so forth.

Source: same as my first comment
edit on 27-8-2020 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2020 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: whereislogic

Do those that aren't content with the plain, simple teachings of Jesus in the New Testament, look in the Old Testament for answers? Yes, people search for answers to quench their brains desires for answers. But in reality, the Father does not exist in words of any book...



Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall
enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth
the will of my Father which is in heaven.


Only the heart, through prayer, can one find the Father.




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