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Scientist predicts supernova Betelgeuse is dangerous.

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posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:36 AM
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Hello,
In this video, a scientist predicts that if Betelgeuse goes supernova,
then that event will affect the solar core and cool it down.
So we will enter a cool period or as he says even a new glacial era.
Some explanations he throws in the ring.
Why would what he says be true or untrue?
Or even is this simple clickbite?
At least this is quite disturbing information.


edit on 28-1-2020 by puntito because: typo in the link




posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: puntito

Video not working



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:39 AM
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a reply to: puntito

Think of the positive side, the extra gamma radiation will cleanse the planet of that nasty Wu-Flu.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:42 AM
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a reply to: puntito

Betelgeuse is a Red Giant isn't it? At least that's what I remember. I didn't think red giants had enough energy/mass to go super nova...which is why they became red giants to begin with.

ETA - In some quick research, I guess it is eventually expected to go super nova, but not for a "little while" yet. (i.e. 100,000 years)


edit on 1/28/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:42 AM
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Betelgeuse is over 600 light-years away from us. That's plenty far enough away to completely water down anything coming our way. For the many, many hundreds of years it'll take to even get here.
Your source is just fear-mongering, because it's easy to scare people who don't know squat about distances that large.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:42 AM
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Got the link going now.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:48 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: puntito

Betelgeuse is a Red Giant isn't it? At least that's what I remember. I didn't think red giants had enough energy/mass to go super nova...which is why they became red giants to begin with.


Red Supergiant which means that (as far as we know) it doesn't contain enough heavy metals to go supernova. It is already beginning to dim out.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:51 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah



That's plenty far enough away to completely water down anything coming our way.

Gamma ray bursts do not "water down"




posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:51 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

So if its 600 light years away,and we are now observing that it is dimming,that means that it was actually dimming 600 years ago.
Maybe it went supernova 500 years ago,and we are yet to observe the gamma burst(as gamma rays do not travel faster than any other EM wavelength).



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 06:55 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: Nyiah



That's plenty far enough away to completely water down anything coming our way.

Gamma ray bursts do not "water down"



Betelgeuse is not expected to go hypernova, which is, as far as I know, the only type of nova that can generate those.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 07:03 AM
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I use to think about things like this then I came to the conclusion "Why bother? "
Yeah, sometimes it's fun to read doom porn, but if it happens 5 minutes from now or 5 years from now, there's still not a thing we can do about it, so why worry.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 07:22 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Yeah but with C by the time we see it, it'll be here.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 07:25 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: Nyiah



That's plenty far enough away to completely water down anything coming our way.

Gamma ray bursts do not "water down"


They may not 'water down', but like other radiation, they diminish over distance following the inverse square law.
link



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 07:25 AM
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a reply to: Gothmog

they do however obey the " inverse square rule "



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Yeh and we'll all be the Hulk yay 🧟



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 07:43 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: puntito

Think of the positive side, the extra gamma radiation will cleanse the planet of that nasty Wu-Flu.
and put an end to speaker of the house.... well done Beetlegeuse



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 07:45 AM
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We will not be in the area of effect to any possible gamma ray exposition, as the rotational axis of Beteigeuze is not directed onto us.

The star itself has enough mass to go supernova, type II.
Which would make it brighter than the full moon, over several weeks.

Anything else? Astrophysics is kinda my hobby.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 07:55 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: Nyiah



That's plenty far enough away to completely water down anything coming our way.

Gamma ray bursts do not "water down"



Radiation exposure is subject to an inverse square law. See below.

www.nde-ed.org...



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: puntito

The coolest thing about Betelgeuse is its name.

Well, the 2nd coolest thing anyway.



posted on Jan, 28 2020 @ 08:05 AM
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originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: Nyiah



That's plenty far enough away to completely water down anything coming our way.

Gamma ray bursts do not "water down"



Betelgeuse is not expected to go hypernova, which is, as far as I know, the only type of nova that can generate those.

I have already acknowledged and confirmed that in a previous post. Not enough heavy metals and the wrong class of star (plus it has already dimmed considerably).
Red giants or red supergiants just cool and shrink , and go away.
But , back to the original subject of my post :
Gamma rays do not "water down"
And that is exactly what is released by a super or hypernova.
Unless you know different.




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