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Civil Asset Forfeitures (theft) continue. DEA seizes man's life savings at airport.

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posted on Jan, 17 2020 @ 10:41 PM
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Well, all I have to say is,,,, that's just about the way it is.
Good post!




posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 12:11 AM
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Trump Supports Civil Asset Forfeiture Even Without Conviction

When it comes to draining the swamp, Trump has dropped the ball on this one. William Barr is on this program as well. I get taking the assets of people who have been convicted, but for a cop to go through your house or car and take whatever cash is around is straight up theft. Thou shalt not steal is an easy one when it comes to the law. Civil Asset Forfeitures is more in line with the globalist communism than the patriot capitalism.

From previous cases, expect about a year and a hefty lawyer bill to get some of the money back. It is not even worth perusing for the lower value amounts that are stolen. A few thousand might be a low amount for some, but when you are working hard and saving your money it is a lot for others.

To help get the US legal system back on the rails, civil forfeiture is an easy one to sort out. Unfortunately it is some low hanging fruit as the liquidity of the repo market has a lot of leaks as the banks cannot sort their mess out.



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 12:27 AM
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Government approved robbery...


All is not well... This is their money and taking it could kill them....

originally posted by: gladtobehere

Family Sues DEA and TSA After Elderly Man's Life Savings Were Seized at Airport.

Apparently, she was supposed to open a joint account with her father but didnt get time prior to her flight so decided she would do it once she landed.

America, wake up.

Wake up from your coma.

How, when, why did we simply allow our public servants (tyrants) and bureaucrats to essentially do whatever they want.


"Flying with any amount of cash is completely legal, but once again we see government agents treating American citizens like criminals," Institute for Justice senior attorney Dan Alban said in a press release.

"You don't forfeit your constitutional rights when you try to board an airplane. It is time for TSA and federal law enforcement to stop seizing cash from travelers simply because the government considers certain amounts of cash 'suspicious.'"

I dont care if they are "criminals".

Our government has essentially criminalized everything.

You're a criminal, whether you know it or not.


A 2017 report by the Justice Department Inspector General found that the DEA seized more than $4 billion in cash from people suspected of drug activity over the previous decade, but $3.2 billion of those seizures were never connected to any criminal charges.


Really really REALLY need to get rid of these unconstitutional alphabet agencies.

Like most of our government, they have no constitutional authority to exist.


The majority of seizures occurred in airports, train stations, and bus terminals, where the DEA regularly snoops on travel records and maintains a network of travel industry employees who act as confidential informants.


The irony in all of this, besides the obvious, is that there are departments within our government which operate in complete secrecy.

Meanwhile, the CITIZEN is required by our public tyrants to essentially disclose every aspect of his or her life, especially his financial life.


edit on 18-1-2020 by 2ndTenor because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 03:37 AM
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a reply to: Komodo


Im not sure what you mean? Banknotes come wrapped from the bank in stacks of 100 meaning 10000 per stack. So she would have had 8 stacks of 100.00. If you think this is somehow to much to carry that's silly. if you want to see what its like go get a stack of 1s from the bank be the same size.



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 05:20 AM
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a reply to: Stupidsecrets


Why not just put it in a bank and access the money from anywhere on the planet?


Good question. From personal experience --

... that doesn't work at all to advantage for regular people. The banks tear out their pound of flesh, be it with transmittal fees, reception fees, currency conversion fees, etc.

There should be a secure way to transfer money from bank to bank between countries without it becoming a feeding frenzy for the bankers. But so far as I can see, there is not. Not sure how the high rollers do it; I can't imagine they're constantly being nickel'd-and-dime'd by the banks.

Cheers
edit on 18-1-2020 by F2d5thCavv2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 06:28 AM
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I suspect the high rollers just take that hit- but I could be wrong.

A million in gold fits easily in a briefcase- but I've never found a good way to convert an asset like that into cash without a 20% hit.



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 08:42 AM
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originally posted by: Stupidsecrets
~snip~

They could have declared it before the flight, filled out the paperwork and it likely would have been fine.



This.

The limit 'without the paperwork' is 10k, this is common knowledge to most travelers.

Many times our troubles are brought upon us by ourselves. It's not always someone else's fault.



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: vonclod

Yep, we gots the free-dumbs.

The only thing more bent than a drug cop is a priest.



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 09:35 AM
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Amendment 5 of the Constitution of the United States of America:

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.


Anyone arguing that this was somehow OK because the people involved "should have done it differently" or "should have known better" is arguing against the Constitution of the United States of America. The section above that I bolded is pretty clear.

Asset forfeiture before conviction of a crime is absolutely unconstitutional.

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: tjack

originally posted by: Stupidsecrets
~snip~

They could have declared it before the flight, filled out the paperwork and it likely would have been fine.



This.

The limit 'without the paperwork' is 10k, this is common knowledge to most travelers.

Many times our troubles are brought upon us by ourselves. It's not always someone else's fault.



ohhh, so because they didn't assume that the government works willingly steal their life's work if they didn't think to file the appropriate paperwork ahead of time, it's their fault?
honestly, anyone who thinks this is okay should be taken out back and shot.
incidentally, they would be if not for the insane "rules and regulations" in place by our "elected" officials.

this is theft, plain and simple. thieves should be shot on sight.



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 11:02 AM
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a reply to: lordcomac

There's plenty of things in this life im not OK with but still have the sense to follow the rules. Your mileage may vary.



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: tjack


There's plenty of things in this life im not OK with but still have the sense to follow the rules.

I just quoted "the rules" above. The TSA is the one not following "the rules."

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Case closed then. Excellent work!



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: tjack
a reply to: lordcomac

There's plenty of things in this life im not OK with but still have the sense to follow the rules. Your mileage may vary.


So you're okay with the tax funded jack boot thugs stealing from people who don't know that they need to play stupid games to not get #ed by the system? Forcing people to declare their possessions at threat of confiscation... where has this gotten us in the past?
Registration leads to confiscation. Next thing you know I'll need to file paperwork for the wifes gold ring- that's gold, you know. Can't go moving it around without the correct papers.

Next week they'll raid your home and find a "flesh" colored crayon under the baseboard heat- little did you know the government passed legislation stating that defining a color for flesh was racist. Now you get ten years in the local camp because you dared to live in the zone they defined last year where you're supposed to file paperwork for all of your belongings.



posted on Jan, 18 2020 @ 12:34 PM
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originally posted by: Komodo
I tried to get $14,000.00 in $1,000.00 bills from a national bank...


Why would you expect to get them, they aren't in circulation or being printed.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 07:48 AM
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a reply to: lordcomac

Hyperbole much?

Im ok with following the simple rules designed to combat illegal money laundering.

Since when has ignorance of a law been a defense for breaking it?

Don't like the law? Fight to get it changed otherwise your outrage is just puffery.

Puff on.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 08:55 AM
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This clearly shows that the land of the free and the home of the brave is very much an illusion.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Komodo would have been better off buying $14,000 worth of physical gold or silver.



posted on Jan, 19 2020 @ 11:34 AM
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originally posted by: CharlesT
Komodo would have been better off buying $14,000 worth of physical gold or silver.


Why? It's not like you can cash it in with ease when traveling.



posted on Jan, 20 2020 @ 07:20 AM
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originally posted by: tjack
a reply to: lordcomac

Hyperbole much?

Im ok with following the simple rules designed to combat illegal money laundering.

Since when has ignorance of a law been a defense for breaking it?

Don't like the law? Fight to get it changed otherwise your outrage is just puffery.

Puff on.

While you arent wrong by any measure, the Redneck posted "the rules", you know an excerpt from the constitution, that makes it clear that what was done here is illegal.



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