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The Greenland Shark Has A Lifespan Of 400 Years

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posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 07:34 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: MissSmartypants

originally posted by: rickymouse
Good thing they do not have to work for an employer for three hundred years. I would hate to have to work till I was three hundred to retire. Those sharks just have to hunt and fish, that isn't really working, I consider that a hobby.

But if fish were swimming all around you through the air all the time and all you had to do was reach out and grab one...would that really be much of a sport?


I consider eating fish one of my favorite sports. I go to the all you can eat whitefish fish fry at a local restaurant and usually get three or four refills, I eat almost two pounds of fish some times. Usually I get full off three sides of whitefish though, unless I feel super competative.

Oh my gosh! So that's you!?
You're somewhat of a legend, you know.

Not sarcasm...no, really.




posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Bigburgh

Hakarl

It is edible ... if prepared correctly. And there is less likelihood that Hakarl will kill you than fugu will.



Haha.."if prepared correctly"..frightening words, Ill pass on this one




Hákarl (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈhauːkʰartl̥]; an abbreviation of kæstur hákarl, referred to as fermented shark in English) is a national dish of Iceland consisting of a Greenland shark or other sleeper shark which has been cured with a particular fermentation process and hung to dry for four to five months. It has a strong ammonia-rich smell and fishy taste.[1]



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 08:10 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

A lot of vegetables are pretty toxic if they aren't fully cooked.

We actually eat quite a bit of food that has to be prepared properly... We just find it part of life because we were raised with it.



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 08:56 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker
For sure, I agree..I was just remembering my lifelong hate of liver. And when the subject comes up, my few liver loving friends insist I haven't had it "prepared correctly"




posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 09:07 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

Yea... I still am not a fan of liver, or organs for that matter.

Although they are super nutrient rich, so I've started finding other ways to include them in food without having the mealy texture of up front organs.



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 09:34 PM
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originally posted by: MissSmartypants

originally posted by: strongfp
a reply to: MissSmartypants

I agree. I am one to notice the fall of classic culinary arts, and beyond. Western society has gone on a separate path. How many cooks and chefs can actually make and work with a egg white raft to clarify a stock?

Not many, not lets go deeper, how many chefs and cooks can smoke fish, can fish, or dry fish in a traditional way? And if you go even deeper, how many normal people can do that?

If people wanted to smoke, can, and dry fish they would....but it's fish....so they don't.
I notice no one's forgotten how to broil a steak or cook up a yummy cheeseburger.


I notice that everyone has forgotten how to cure beef.

Much less butcher a cow, or an elk, or a deer...

There are no steak trees or cheeseburger trees where you just pick one when they are ripe.

People are too used to stores and have no idea how to actually store.

Which is on one hand quite a shame but on the other hand a good way to purge the gene pool the next time life on this Earth goes south for awhile.




posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker

We eat tons of chicken hearts. They're so cheap and you can basically sub them in place of chopped chicken thigh. The only difference is texture. They're denser, chewier.

We also use chicken livers whenever we make stock for extra flavor and then puree the leftover down to add to the soup.

And you haven't lived until you've tasted the brined, smoked, shaved beef heart our local butcher does!



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 10:26 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I've been adding giblits to gravys and stocks recently.

I still don't care for them outright, but I've really grown to them factored into dishes.

I'd totally be down to try the beef heart the way your butcher does it. I've had beef tounge prepared well, and it really surprised me. Both are very muscular, so I imagine texture is similar, though the heart would probably have a more iron taste which the smoke might cut.



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: MissSmartypants

Ya there are sharks and other things out there older then the USA and a lot other nations out there today.

300 hundred to 400 years of swimming around eating things is likely nothing for sharks. They have been that way and swimming the ocean eating things pretty much unchanged for over 400 million years.

I would say that after almost 500 million years and your still around and pretty much unchanged, and likely be around for a lot longer yet to come. That's one hell of an effective evolutionary path as it would be hard to argue with the numbers. Just do the maths. Now who here thinks they will still be around in the same shape and form still doing the same things in 400 to 500 million years?

Nature at its most effective and streamlined indeed. I suppose you could say that sharks are a blast from the past.



posted on Dec, 15 2019 @ 11:28 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: vonclod

A lot of vegetables are pretty toxic if they aren't fully cooked.

We actually eat quite a bit of food that has to be prepared properly... We just find it part of life because we were raised with it.


I am glad to see there are others that know this. I was not aware that many veggies can cause metabolic issues if you eat them raw or undercooked and I had a hard time believing these things when I found them. I researched the hell out of things thinking that so many people in our society these days can't be wrong. but reading many many science based articles proved to me that consensus of the time is wrong. .

I guess that we strayed away from what we were supposed to teach our young. My mother was the first one to toss out the teachings of her parents, she suffered because of it, and so did my sister. Both myself and my brother worked hard and sweat out the toxins. Now I have returned to a more ancestral diet since I am old and do not work hard enough to sweat things out. I should build a sauna.



posted on Dec, 16 2019 @ 07:01 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

What a great idea on going to ancestral roots. I think it also helps to make sure and eat local ingredients. The vegetation is conditioned for the areas they grow and pass benefits. Also, pollen from those plants won't bother people as much when you consume it.

Saunas are great as well, especially in your area.



posted on Dec, 16 2019 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Thing is though that there are very few vegetables I've found that I don't like both cooked and raw. Some I prefer raw.



posted on Dec, 16 2019 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: rickymouse

What a great idea on going to ancestral roots. I think it also helps to make sure and eat local ingredients. The vegetation is conditioned for the areas they grow and pass benefits. Also, pollen from those plants won't bother people as much when you consume it.

Saunas are great as well, especially in your area.


The Jetstream undulates north and south around the earth, being in Upper Michigan we are actually in a similar climate to Finland where my ancestors came from, about ninety degrees off. We are actually more south than Finland but the magnetic field bobs so we basically immigrated to this area. I did an immigration search where people from Europe immigrated to in the USA and found there was a definite pattern as to where they went. I feel at home here, if I go east or west I feel different, but I felt great in Washington when I was there, lots of Finns there too. It is similar to what it is in Finland too.

It is weird how that works. Those magnetic lines go down to Florida, lots of Finns between here and Florida, almost straight down from us.

But diet is effected by that electromagnetic fields interaction with our epigenetics, so maybe if I moved to a different place with a different kind of energy, I may have toto eat different foods than I need to eat here. Nobody has actually studied that yet as far as I know. I even did research as to how mineral bodies in the earth effect the electromagnetic field, there is a similarity to Scandinavian countries mining and to the mining here.

There are no coincidences, Finns and swedes may have come here because of the mines, but they stayed here, straight up and down from this location, or many moved to Washington where the electromagnetic field is similar. Settlers in Canada also follow a similar pattern.

It would be interesting to find how the variances I am talking about are related to health. I doubt if research on this will be funded, that is a lot of money for a limited ethnic group, but maybe every immigration follows those paths too. Birds all follow those magnetic lines when migrating and moving to different areas usually. Humans are not unique at all. I bet lots of migrations are stirred up by that.



posted on Dec, 16 2019 @ 11:22 AM
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Like a tree....hmmmm. Bet it still tastes lime chicken.


a reply to: Homefree



posted on Dec, 16 2019 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: rickymouse

What a great idea on going to ancestral roots. I think it also helps to make sure and eat local ingredients. The vegetation is conditioned for the areas they grow and pass benefits. Also, pollen from those plants won't bother people as much when you consume it.

Saunas are great as well, especially in your area.


The Jetstream undulates north and south around the earth, being in Upper Michigan we are actually in a similar climate to Finland where my ancestors came from, about ninety degrees off. We are actually more south than Finland but the magnetic field bobs so we basically immigrated to this area. I did an immigration search where people from Europe immigrated to in the USA and found there was a definite pattern as to where they went. I feel at home here, if I go east or west I feel different, but I felt great in Washington when I was there, lots of Finns there too. It is similar to what it is in Finland too.

It is weird how that works. Those magnetic lines go down to Florida, lots of Finns between here and Florida, almost straight down from us.

But diet is effected by that electromagnetic fields interaction with our epigenetics, so maybe if I moved to a different place with a different kind of energy, I may have toto eat different foods than I need to eat here. Nobody has actually studied that yet as far as I know. I even did research as to how mineral bodies in the earth effect the electromagnetic field, there is a similarity to Scandinavian countries mining and to the mining here.

There are no coincidences, Finns and swedes may have come here because of the mines, but they stayed here, straight up and down from this location, or many moved to Washington where the electromagnetic field is similar. Settlers in Canada also follow a similar pattern.

It would be interesting to find how the variances I am talking about are related to health. I doubt if research on this will be funded, that is a lot of money for a limited ethnic group, but maybe every immigration follows those paths too. Birds all follow those magnetic lines when migrating and moving to different areas usually. Humans are not unique at all. I bet lots of migrations are stirred up by that.



Animals are subconsciously aware of this. Humans (being animals) are also aware of this.

The only difference is that we over think things and go against our instincts.



posted on Dec, 16 2019 @ 04:44 PM
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In retrospect, these sharks are lucky it takes so much work to make them edible. If they tasted like pumpkin pie or some Chinese doc thought they gave your penis a boost, as slowly as they grow and mature, they'd have been fished out long before we realized this.




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