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Not a single French press made in the USA ...

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posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 03:13 PM
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as far as I know. I recently broke my third French press, a standard glass model from Bodum. I decided to buy a steel version to end the breakage cycle; my other criterion was it had to be made in the USA, or at least not in China. I’ve searched extensively online, and can’t find any steel French press not made in China, including the misleadingly named Frieling USA brand. In fact, the only French press of any kind I’ve found that isn’t made in China is the Denby model made in the UK, but alas, it’s both pricey and made of ceramic. Bodum is secretive about where its stuff is made (as are all such companies), so I suspect it’s made in the Middle Kingdom.

I wish I had the money and skills to start my own French press manufacturing firm; I think folks would pay substantially more for a high-quality product made in the good ‘ol USA. I would definitely consider investing in such a startup.

Note: Commenters on Amazon say their Bodum French presses were made in either Portugal or Poland, but maybe that’s changed since they commented. IDK.
edit on 2-12-2019 by Scapegrace because: Typo

edit on 2-12-2019 by Scapegrace because: More typos




posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: Scapegrace

American Press.



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 03:21 PM
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I broke the glass in my Melior press a few days after I bought a backup unit. These days, I keep spares, all Bodum, around, and currently have four backups. I think I'm set for life, and I am avoiding the high current prices of presses. I get them cheap at garage sales. You should do the same.

EDIT: The American Press looks like what the Aeropress should have been.
edit on 2-12-2019 by Lazarus Short because: do do do



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: Scapegrace




I wish I had the money and skills to start my own French press manufacturing firm; I think folks would pay substantially more for a high-quality product made in the good ‘ol USA. I would definitely consider investing in such a startup.


French pressed coffee is by far better than any brewed coffee I've made! Please, if you start your own manufacturing company, make a French press with a screw off bottom! They're such a pain to clean!



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 03:28 PM
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They're not made in France?

Here you go:


'Merican Press
edit on 2-12-2019 by jtrenthacker because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 03:37 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: Scapegrace

American Press.


Q: What's so "American" about the American Press?

A: Our name has a lot of layers to it. I'm American (Alex here, the inventor) and the American Press originated at an American university, and naturally we're based right here in the USA. We also share a common physical form with French, and so too our name shares a common form with French. Most importantly, the style of coffee the American Press produces is distinctly American, producing an Americano-like cup of "filter" coffee commonly referred to as "American style" coffee.


Based in the US, I don't see them say made in the US.



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 04:08 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: Scapegrace

American Press.


I looked on the site to see if it was made in the USA and nothing actually says it is made in the USA. It may not even be made in the Americas. They may order parts special made and assemble them here, but then you would think they would say assembled in the USA anyway. The guy who designed it is from the USA it appears. You can contact manufactures over the net from China and send them specs and they will make all the parts, they also will assemble stuff, all you need to do to stick a made in America cover on it is to put it together or put a sticker on it that says made in America, but you have to do something...they will supply the sticker for you to put on too. I could not find anywhere on what I read that they are saying it is actually produced in America or what part of america.



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I messaged them to find out.



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: Scapegrace

Most glass cookware/kitchenware is inferior to what was produced even ten years ago.

If you look at a Pyrex glass measuring cup now vs one made in 2000 you'll see the glass looks completely different.

The absolutely best glass was German Schott Mainz Glass. If you can find vintage pieces it's worth it. I think they even made french press glass too.

Sounds funny but German Glass French Press



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 04:23 PM
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a reply to: Scapegrace

I used to use a French press all the time, but got sick of cleaning the damn thing.

I just make turkish coffee now, quicker, easier to clean, it's just a pot, water, coffee, boil two times, pour, let settle, enjoy. Or pour into your carry mug or what ever. Same concept as 'cowboy' coffee, just quicker.



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: Scapegrace

They'd have to be called USA Presses, wouldn't they?




posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: Scapegrace

American Press.







posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

That should have good coffee ground extraction.



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 10:08 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: rickymouse

I messaged them to find out.


Funny they do not list that on their site, it seems to me that that would be a good sales point for their company.



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

You would be surprised by your local glass blowers. They can craft some amazingly strong items.
An under-utilized craft in my opinion.



posted on Dec, 2 2019 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: rickymouse

I messaged them to find out.


Nice, I was about to do the same and then read on to see this.

We do our best to only buy stuff from where and whom its made best - often, that means Made in the USA ('MURICA!!) - although a lot ofnour kitchen stuff comes from elsewhere, because its made well.

My thinking is less about buying Made In the USA then it is doing my small part to influence the market toward good quality. If more people bought good quality "stuff", then economies of scale would bring the cost of "good stuff" down some.

I do believe the perception of "Made in the USA" is good for US manufacturing, especially small, specialty businesses, as the backlash against junk products grows. My hope is that more and more of that "good stuff" is made here in the US - we can't well compete against cheap labor and free-reign factory pollution, so our best hope for manufacturing is to grow the "good quality" market.



posted on Dec, 3 2019 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
A friend of mine has this. It is fantastic.



posted on Dec, 3 2019 @ 09:38 PM
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originally posted by: dogstar23

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: rickymouse

I messaged them to find out.


Nice, I was about to do the same and then read on to see this.

We do our best to only buy stuff from where and whom its made best - often, that means Made in the USA ('MURICA!!) - although a lot ofnour kitchen stuff comes from elsewhere, because its made well.

My thinking is less about buying Made In the USA then it is doing my small part to influence the market toward good quality. If more people bought good quality "stuff", then economies of scale would bring the cost of "good stuff" down some.

I do believe the perception of "Made in the USA" is good for US manufacturing, especially small, specialty businesses, as the backlash against junk products grows. My hope is that more and more of that "good stuff" is made here in the US - we can't well compete against cheap labor and free-reign factory pollution, so our best hope for manufacturing is to grow the "good quality" market.

Amen! I’ve been thinking the exact same thing. There are so many talented craftspeople here and a lot of folks want high-quality products they know are safe. I don’t trust anything made in China and I want to support American workers. I’m surprised some entrepreneur hasn’t started something like Williams-Sonoma with nothing but American-made goods. It might spark the creation of many small firms and keep various skills alive.
edit on 3-12-2019 by Scapegrace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2019 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: Scapegrace
I read somewhere that “made in America” and “manufactured in America” are two very different things. To qualify for the former, your product — or at least a substantial part of it — must be made from American parts and/or materials and be assembled here. The latter label supposedly means parts and materials come largely from foreign sources, but assembly is done here. Take this with a grain of salt as I saw it mentioned on a site unconnected with any government agency.



posted on Dec, 4 2019 @ 06:46 AM
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originally posted by: dogstar23
Nice, I was about to do the same and then read on to see this.


Over 24 hours later and still no reply, pretty piss poor customer service if you ask me.




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