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Unexpected walk into a very remote monolithic stone circle, UK.

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posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 09:03 AM
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Not sure if this is of any significance to anyone on ATS, but after having a strong urge to chill out at a stone monolith named Lanyon Quoit, Madron, Cornwall, UK and walk towards the old Tin mine (Boskednan Mine), i did not expect to walk into a Pagan Monolith Stone Circle that is barely accessible.

The following picture shows "Lanyon Quoit" that is easily accessible from the road side.


Continuing further and heading towards Boskednan Mine, the path is not even a path. It is nothing more than a narrow 1/2 ft wide ditch of mud, puddles, granite boulders and sand. In some places, you may as well make your own path across the heather.


As seen, the stone circle is barren (spiritually perfect), with no real footpaths and puddles everywhere. Yet in the past, many millenniums ago, this would have been a minor Gate point where spirits traverse from our world to theirs
Ley-Line Interception Point.

The 21" frame bike gives an idea as to how big the granite stones were.....


Are there others on ATS that have a similar urge to walk alone, through a monolithic stone circle, or a "Men-an-Tol" and chill out at the same time in the spiritual realm ? Just curious.
Men-an-Tol, close by. Note: the same Boskednan mine in the distance on the horizon.

Sometimes i wonder if this was a monolithic interrogation chamber seeing that the granite stones form a "101" similar to the "Room 101" in the book "1984" by "George Orwell". Just having a laugh at the idea. However - what if it really was a Monolithic Room 101 ?

Later on whilst cycling down a dirt track towards an old Pagan spring named "Ding Dong", i passed through a location where multiple ribbons had been tied to a tree.
The song "Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Old Oak Tree" by "Tony Orlando & Dawn" in 1973 sprung to mind.



Continuing down the path, i walked in on 3 women who were in silence sitting next to the wishing well called "Ding Dong".
i walked in, took a picture of the well, and they all got up as though i had corrupted their spell. Oh well, sh1t happens. Lol
Hey, maybe they cast a curse on me for doing so.

In the past centuries, the corrupted Church would have gladly classified these pagan witches as enemies and burned them at the stake. Then they would have built their church on top of the same spring and christened new born babies with the same water.




posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: Rapha


This was so much fun to read. Thank you for posting.
S&F...please post more photos if you have them.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 09:35 AM
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wow, that is so cool!
Me and my dog often go adventuring, but all we have around here is woods and old indian mounds to explore.
What is the significance of the ribbons on that particular tree, do you know?



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: Rapha
Excellent pictures. I've done similar explorations in that area. (Couldn't find Zennor Quoit, though. Got piskie-led.)

Incidentally, stone circles are usually called "megalithic".
"Megalith" ="big stone".
"Monolith" = "single stone" (like the one at the beginning of 2001)


edit on 10-9-2019 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT
Ok here you go.
Here is a map of the area ...


Photograph of the standing stone named "Men Scryfa"


Lanyon Quoit with "Boskednan Mine" in the distance.




Another "Room 101" lol


The Men-an-Tol viewed from a different angle.....



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:27 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
Excellent pictures. I've done similar explorations in that area. (Couldn't find Zennor Quoit, though. Got piskie-led.)

Incidentally, stone circles are usually called "megalithic".
"Megalith" ="big stone".
"Monolith" = "single stone" (like the one at the beginning of 2001)

Hey - maybe exchange locations and i will map out certain locations whilst you map out others.
Zennor Quoit is either accessible by foot or by a road that close to Nancledure.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:28 AM
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originally posted by: horseplay
wow, that is so cool!
Me and my dog often go adventuring, but all we have around here is woods and old indian mounds to explore.
What is the significance of the ribbons on that particular tree, do you know?

The Ribbons are in some way linked to the spiritual realm.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: Rapha
I'm non-local, so a return visit isn't practical in the near future.
On the day, I was trying to follow the track on the O.S. map, but it just petered out on the ridge, and I wandered through the moor a bit with the help of a compass, and finally got back to a road where somebody gave me a lift to St.Ives.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: Rapha

This reminds me so much of the series Outlander!



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
I'm non-local, so a return visit isn't practical in the near future.
On the day, I was trying to follow the track on the O.S. map, but it just petered out on the ridge, and I wandered through the moor a bit with the help of a compass, and finally got back to a road where somebody gave me a lift to St.Ives.

Well. maybe 1 day you will return. i grew up in the Penwith area, so if you are in the area at all, then send me a message and i will meet you at Penzance bus / train station.

Lol. Well at least you ended up in St Ives that is a lot better than the "gone to hell" Penzance town.
Trust me: i know the life that Penzance had back in 1996 and before.
After walking Penzance @3AM on a Sunday morning and watching the local youth have nothing to do; it was depressing.
It is like the globalists do not give a damn for the youth living in a far off distant Cornish town of Penzance.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:11 AM
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originally posted by: horseplay
What is the significance of the ribbons on that particular tree, do you know?


Wishing trees. Good luck. There are sacred trees and places all over England where coins are embedded in trees, ribbons or other "offerings" . Some are steeped in a long history. There's an ancient one near me - a yew tree - it's a bit spooky.

The UK has some very ancient landscapes. Credit the OP for signposting to one of them.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: Rapha
My maternal grandfather, William Penrose Symons, was born and brought up St-Just-in-Penwith, so that was our annual pilgrimage for his benefit, which is why I go to the Penwith area if at all. Penzance will be my base because of the train and bus links.
He went to Panzance Grammar School, allegedly the first name on the Honours Board.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 11:34 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
My maternal grandfather, William Penrose Symons, was born and brought up St-Just-in-Penwith, so that was our annual pilgrimage for his benefit, which is why I go to the Penwith area if at all. Penzance will be my base because of the train and bus links.
He went to Penzance Grammar School, allegedly the first name on the Honours Board.

Crumbs - "Penrose" is a Cornish name and St Just is really out in the sticks, close to Land's End.
The spiritual value of Zennor (St Just) during Winter is incredible. It might be remote, cold, wet, with the stormy winds blowing in off the Atlantic Ocean. Yet you can guarantee, whilst in Zennor, during a day in Winter, the entire landscape around you will be empty of people.
It might be gray, stormy; but nothing will wipe the smile off your face, no matter how cold it is.

Penzance is the major node for railways and bus routes.

From there, either move via car, foot or bike. The bus service is slow.

Penzance Grammar School - LOl. He obviously passed the 11+. i did not and ended up going to Heamoor Secondary school. LOL.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: Rapha

Thank you for sharing this with us! I would love to explore sacred grounds in England, but alas, I would never be able to afford it.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

thank you, I figured it was something spiritual or honoring the dead or something like that. I could use a good luck wishing tree.

I had to google Yew trees, they look like they get very ancient. I can't tell by the pics what kind of tree that is, but I don't think it's a Yew. But I found this fun fact:



Yew trees were planted in graveyards as they thrived on corpses and were then readily available to make excellent bows. ... Poisonous yew trees were planted in churchyards so that farmers made sure that their animals didn't stray into them. Yew wood is distinctly red and white, especially when the trunk is freshly cut.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 12:47 PM
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originally posted by: Night Star
Thank you for sharing this with us! I would love to explore sacred grounds in England, but alas, I would never be able to afford it.

Well - maybe put in a request for guys in the UK, that might be living very close to a monolithic site that interests you and ask them to walk the area, take some pictures and upload them onto ATS.

Anything is possible these days.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: Rapha

That first picture is pretty cool, really amazing how they managed to move such large stones like that. The image with the doughnut shaped stone is also interesting, people used to carve large stones like that as a form of money. The setup indicates that stone had a different purpose though. I just wonder if anyone would really put in the effort required to carve such a stone for it to merely be a work of art. Makes we wonder if it has any relation to the recent thread about the conductivity of different stones.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: Rapha

That first picture is pretty cool, really amazing how they managed to move such large stones like that.

My thought is that they were moved and positioned at some time when there was a lot of snow and ice on the ground, perhaps as a glacier retreated. If you don't have wheels, that would make things a whole lot easier.



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 04:20 PM
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I think the ribbons you saw are" clooties " ,an ancient Celtic ritual where pieces of cloth are dipped in a holy well and then tied to the tree and a prayer is said or something is asked of the spirits such as health for child and such like. It's still practiced today especially in Scotland. Wikipedia has a thred on it, I would link it but I dont know how.


edit on 10-9-2019 by penfold because: Spelling



posted on Sep, 10 2019 @ 04:36 PM
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a reply to: Rapha

The UK must be a really bitch'n place? Awesome thread!



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