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Unexpected walk into a very remote monolithic stone circle, UK.

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posted on Sep, 11 2019 @ 10:03 PM
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a reply to: Rapha

Neat.

The only cool thing I found doing urban exploring was a magnet.

It's always nice to stumble across a treat like that, it looks so serene, these ancients certainly had a knack for aesthetics.

As for my magnet, it joined my fridge magnets, the funny thing is it has 'CAUTION-MAGNETIC' I dunno who came up with that but I call him professor obvious.

It's a beautiful place, let's keep it a secret so no faux New agers find out and host burning man and trash the joint.




posted on Sep, 12 2019 @ 01:15 AM
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originally posted by: ThePeaceMaker
maybe I can incorporate the stone circles in with a starry sky. I know how hit and miss cornwall can be with the weather though.

Any chance you can provide a bit more of a location to these stone circles like a road name or a screen shot from google earth/maps as to where they are ?

My dad lives in Bodmin so it's a bit of a drive but I can't complain about that driving through cornwalls countryside is lovely

Starry sky. LOL. Good luck with that one. However, quite often there are good days in October.

2 Routes to get to location.
A) Train / Bus to Penzance. From Penzance head north along the road B3312. The road will pass through a town called Heamoor. Stay on the main road (B3312) and pass through the town Madron. Lanyon Quoit is on your right hand side. The stones and towns are all on Google Earth.

B) Travel by car from Bodmin to Penzance along the A30. Stay on the A30 and bypass Penzance. Soon on the outskirts of Penzance you will enter a round-a-bout where the last exit will take you into Heamoor. Stay on the main road (B3312) and pass through the town Madron. Lanyon Quoit is on your right hand side. The stones and towns are all on Google Earth.



posted on Sep, 12 2019 @ 06:14 AM
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a reply to: Rapha
Thanks a bunch and yes I never hold my breath for clear nights when I'm visiting but who knows I might get lucky



posted on Sep, 12 2019 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: Rapha


Thank you for your excellent post and photos.

We are blessed in the UK to have so many pre Roman features. We get down to the south west two or three times a year and always take an OS map so we can visit an out of the way stone circle or tumulus.


As you know, not all are as dramatic or photogenic but every single one - no matter how small and inconspicuous - has a tangible power.


As another poster has noted, the whole region - and particularly the moors - has an amazing energy that I've never encountered anywhere else apart from Brittany.

The bloke who runs my local kebab shop says I need to go to Cappadocia but I'm not having it!



posted on Sep, 13 2019 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: Rapha

I routinely feel the urge to get stoned in grassy fields..

Guess that's not precisely the same thing.

Awesome post in all seriousness .
Love the ribbon tree and the water well.



posted on Sep, 14 2019 @ 01:54 AM
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So were these in any way excavated, restored, and then reinforced also like Stonehenge?



posted on Sep, 14 2019 @ 08:07 AM
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originally posted by: JonathanNicholas
a reply to: Rapha

I routinely feel the urge to get stoned in grassy fields..

Guess that's not precisely the same thing.

Awesome post in all seriousness .
Love the ribbon tree and the water well.



Same here and I use to, now my job stops me from doing so. Probably for the best.



posted on Sep, 14 2019 @ 08:09 AM
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originally posted by: reject
So were these in any way excavated, restored, and then reinforced also like Stonehenge?


I can't back up my reply but I'd say no. Cornwall and the West Country is quite known for random stones being placed in areas. It's also an area in the UK where the local populations are actually proud of their heritage and how do I put it .. the local youths or vandals are at a minimum. You'll find some of these stones are usually quite hidden or out the way and you'll only find them when you aren't looking for them



posted on Sep, 16 2019 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: reject
So were these in any way excavated, restored, and then reinforced also like Stonehenge?

en.wikipedia.org...
"In the eighteenth century the quoit had four supporting stones and the structure was tall enough for a person on horseback to ride under. On 19 October 1815, Lanyon Quoit fell down in a storm. Nine years later enough money was raised by local inhabitants to re-erect the structure, under the guidance of Captain Giddy of the Royal Navy. One of the original stones was considered too badly damaged to put back in place, thus there are only three uprights today and the structure does not stand so high as it once did. The reconstruction also placed the structure at right angles to its original position."

IMHO, the physical structure itself does not matter. The geographical location is all that matters in accordance with ley-lines. As long as X (Lanyon Quoit) marks the spot, nothing else matters.

i am sure the "local inhabitants" (yocals) would have been guided by the spirit realm to rebuild Lanyon Quoit as it should be in accordance to (maybe) a new spiritual era.



posted on Sep, 17 2019 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: Rapha
You may also know the story of the Logan stone at Treen.
In 1844 a less responsible naval officer, Lieutenant Goldsmith, led a party of men which threw it off its delicate balance above the cliffs and into the sea. The locals were not impressed. Nor was the Royal Navy, which made him spend a portion of his life and fortune getting it back up again. According to Arthur Mee, in the Cornwall volume of "The King's England", the cost of the replacement was £124 10s 4d (that is, one hundred and twenty-four pounds, ten shillings, and fourpence).



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 04:10 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
You may also know the story of the Logan stone at Treen.
In 1844 a less responsible naval officer, Lieutenant Goldsmith, led a party of men which threw it off its delicate balance above the cliffs and into the sea. The locals were not impressed. Nor was the Royal Navy, which made him spend a portion of his life and fortune getting it back up again. According to Arthur Mee, in the Cornwall volume of "The King's England", the cost of the replacement was £124 10s 4d (that is, one hundred and twenty-four pounds, ten shillings, and fourpence).

Goldsmith was obviously arrogant and overstepped his mark. He may have been very efficient in the British Royal Navy. However, in the spiritual realm he played no part. The spirit realm thought otherwise and dealt with it.

If a mortal is about to do something with a Pagan rock, then the spirit world will guide them if they are one of a 3rd / 4th Generation Curse (Exodus 20:5-6). These cursed families are destined to deal with certain issues in both spiritual realm and our physical world. Always ask the locals as to what they 'feel' because quite often they 'sense' what needs to be done.

If Goldsmith was one of these 'damned' Generational families then his initial movement of the rock would have been an instant success. Goldsmith assumed his effort was important. As it was not, he literally payed the price out of his savings to clean up the mess that he had created.

If he was one of the elite back then, and the mistake was still made, then the elite, with their reserve of hard currency would have paid for the disaster.




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