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Pointy and lengthened skulls discovery

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posted on Aug, 27 2019 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: smurfy
But not 3m though....however it was also a Peruvian thing, (Nazca) to head bind, but not exclusive to them.

It's interesting, however, how there seems to be a genetic link between the two, one in Peru and the other in the Baltic. Both share the U2e1 haplogroup. Did Denisovans have unusually long skulls?

mtDNA doesn't affect physical appearance. It appears ONLY in the mitochondria of cells, not in the DNA of the individual.
U2e diverged from U2 mtDNA 50k years ago.

So you're saying that if we test the current population in those areas, there will still be a high concentration of this similarity? That seems to raise even more questions.




posted on Aug, 27 2019 @ 04:39 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: smurfy
But not 3m though....however it was also a Peruvian thing, (Nazca) to head bind, but not exclusive to them.

It's interesting, however, how there seems to be a genetic link between the two, one in Peru and the other in the Baltic. Both share the U2e1 haplogroup. Did Denisovans have unusually long skulls?

mtDNA doesn't affect physical appearance. It appears ONLY in the mitochondria of cells, not in the DNA of the individual.
U2e diverged from U2 mtDNA 50k years ago.

So you're saying that if we test the current population in those areas, there will still be a high concentration of this similarity? That seems to raise even more questions.

Where did I say this?

You can look up the occurrence frequency of this particular version of the U type mtDNA you know. We don't have to test - it's been done.

Harte



posted on Aug, 27 2019 @ 04:57 PM
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originally posted by: Harte
You can look up the occurrence frequency of this particular version of the U type mtDNA you know. We don't have to test - it's been done.

U2e1 occurrence is mostly Northern Europe after branching off from the proto-Indo-European source. I'm just wondering how it could end up in some elongated skulls -- probably not Scandinavian transplants -- in Peru back when these people were alive. That's quite a hike to make, particular without leaving any clear migratory trail between the two locations.
edit on 27-8-2019 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2019 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Harte
You can look up the occurrence frequency of this particular version of the U type mtDNA you know. We don't have to test - it's been done.

U2e1 occurrence is mostly Northern Europe after branching off from the proto-Indo-European source. I'm just wondering how it could end up in some elongated skulls -- probably not Scandinavian transplants -- in Peru back when these people were alive. That's quite a hike to make, particular without leaving any clear migratory trail between the two locations.

50,000 years is a long time.

Harte



posted on Aug, 29 2019 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

An Ice age levels everything, grinding all to dust.



posted on Aug, 29 2019 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: Harte
50,000 years is a long time.

It sure is.
People Who Walked Around the World



posted on Aug, 29 2019 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: solve
a reply to: Blue Shift
An Ice age levels everything, grinding all to dust.

Not everything, or we wouldn't have dinosaur fossils.



posted on Aug, 29 2019 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Oh, i meant the missing evidence of a migratory trail, many fossil finds from Europe are very fragmented, pretty much only the ocean floor and caves hold intact evidence/specimens.
edit on 29-8-2019 by solve because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2019 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: solve
a reply to: Blue Shift

Oh, i meant the missing evidence of a migratory trail, many fossil finds from Europe are very fragmented, pretty much only the ocean floor and caves hold intact evidence/specimens.

That's why DNA testing is so interesting. If somebody has a particular haplogroup that is also found in some distant area, it had to get there somehow. And the people with the haplogroup probably weren't just individuals with wanderlust, so there would probably be a smattering of the haplogroup in the local population today, as well as populations in-between the two areas, suggesting a migratory path. Peru and the Baltic are pretty far away from each other, though, and there doesn't seem to be a local Peruvian bloom of the haplogroup. So how did it get there in these old, weird mummies?



posted on Aug, 30 2019 @ 12:42 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I have to say, i have not studied the DNA/haplogroup things, so its not my thing at all,

But,

I have studied a religion that started with the neanderthal, and have traced it, it is found in Europe,Scandinavia, northern Russia (Siberian coast), all the way to the far east, and eventually across to Canada,

So it is a possibility, that they also crossed North America all the way down to South America.



posted on Sep, 1 2019 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: solve
a reply to: Blue Shift

Oh, i meant the missing evidence of a migratory trail, many fossil finds from Europe are very fragmented, pretty much only the ocean floor and caves hold intact evidence/specimens.

That's why DNA testing is so interesting. If somebody has a particular haplogroup that is also found in some distant area, it had to get there somehow. And the people with the haplogroup probably weren't just individuals with wanderlust, so there would probably be a smattering of the haplogroup in the local population today, as well as populations in-between the two areas, suggesting a migratory path. Peru and the Baltic are pretty far away from each other, though, and there doesn't seem to be a local Peruvian bloom of the haplogroup. So how did it get there in these old, weird mummies?

Probably through migrations that occurred from Asia (possibly the Altai region?) in both directions.

Harte



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