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Capital One Data Breach Impacting millions of users

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posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 07:53 AM
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Just another in a long list of exploits that waste of talent criminals think are l33t without thinking about the apparent consequences of those actions for themselves and those impacted. Short of her being on a Red Team for Capital One, which she wasnt, then she is nothing but a criminal. Thankfully this women will pay the price for that approach..

"A software engineer in Seattle hacked into a server holding customer information for Capital One and obtained the personal data of over 100 million people, federal prosecutors said on Monday, in one of the largest thefts of data from a bank."

This part puts the scope of this exploit into perspective,"Approximately 100 million people in the United States and 6 million more in Canada are affected, the company said, with about 140,000 Social Security numbers, 1 million Canadian Social Insurance numbers and 80,000 bank account numbers compromised."

NY Times on Capital One Breach

CNN on Capital One Breach




posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

About june 5th I had my bank account emptied, and again on the 7th.

Just did the equifax claim online for the settlement yesterday.

Now I'm seeing this.


Really, our old folks with their trust in the First National Bank of Mattress had the right idea, I'll tell ya.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 08:20 AM
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a reply to: Iconic

We have several accounts in more than one bank. One of them is itty bitty, teeny tiny.

The idea with two is that one is our active bank card account. We feed small amounts into it, enough for about a week or so as needed. If the bank cards get taken, they can only drain so much. The other one can only be touched by our active transfer. It doesn't even drain to cover the first.

The third is in a tiny, small town bank, and we keep a savings there for real emergencies. The idea is that we have to do some real work to get at it, so we only would access it in times of real need.

Between them, we figure it would be hard to get completely drained of funds all at once, and that's without counting other avenues to raise cash should it be needed.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

Not much of a hack:

"Ms. Thompson, who formerly worked for Amazon Web Services, which hosted the Capital One database that was breached, was not shy about her work as a hacker."

She worked for Amazon web hosting services. This begs the question with all the banks moving to the cloud is the security against people having privileged access strong enough.

As usually, the news media misses the real story.

Still, it is amazing she got caught. I didn't think law enforcement did anything meaningful with regards to white collar crime!


edit on 30-7-2019 by dfnj2015 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 08:51 AM
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"What's in your wallet?"

"It sure isn't money."



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

copy *.* a:

"Look, I am a hacker."

"Dude, if you want to be more l33t, use FTP."



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:01 AM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
a reply to: opethPA

Not much of a hack:

"Ms. Thompson, who formerly worked for Amazon Web Services, which hosted the Capital One database that was breached, was not shy about her work as a hacker."

She worked for Amazon web hosting services. This begs the question with all the banks moving to the cloud is the security against people having privileged access strong enough.

As usually, the news media misses the real story.

Still, it is amazing she got caught. I didn't think law enforcement did anything meaningful with regards to white collar crime!



In a connected world where AWS plays such a huge role access is a requirement without knowing the steps she took in her exploit it is hard to say where the blame lies other than with her.


Beyond that I pretty much disagree with all the opinion pieces of your post.

The Media didn't miss the real story because the real story was a criminal did something illegal and they got caught and now hopefully she pays the maximum price for that.

If you read the article it's not that amazing she got caught because she bragged about it online.

Finally your perception of what the law does with white collar crime is wrong. Grab your latest 2600 and look in the personal sections to see PenPals requests from those serving prison time for similar crimes for just one very small type of proof that those crimes are prosecuted.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:02 AM
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originally posted by: roadgravel
a reply to: dfnj2015

copy *.* a:

"Look, I am a hacker."

"Dude, if you want to be more l33t, use FTP."



Technically if you want to be more l33t you would use SFTP ¿ LOL!



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:15 AM
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If a company is comfortable with strangers having access to your data then the cloud is for you.

Will Capitol One still have saved in costs after paying this one off.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:18 AM
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The best part is that this happened over a week and a half ago, and we're just hearing about it NOW.

Who needs to know about their bank account info and SS being stolen anyway?



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: Iconic


About june 5th I had my bank account emptied, and again on the 7th.


What did you and your bank do about it? Was it recovered? Any clue on who or where the perpetrator was or where from?



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

I just read this story which also had a side tidbit about Equifax. If your name was in the 140 million, you can claim 10 years of credit monitoring... I went ahead and applied for it to see if I got it.

Edit: Getting 10 years of identity protection, apparently I was part of those effected.
edit on 30-7-2019 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:26 AM
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originally posted by: roadgravel
"What's in your wallet?"

"It sure isn't money."



Used to be:

"What's in your wallet?"

Now the answer is:

Used to be money......til it got drained.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:27 AM
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a reply to: opethPA


Finally your perception of what the law does with white collar crime is wrong. Grab your latest 2600 and look in the personal sections to see PenPals requests from those serving prison time for similar crimes for just one very small type of proof that those crimes are prosecuted.


I can tell you from personal experience that the Feds drag out investigations of these crimes forever and then they only prosecute one small portion of the crimes that have been committed. Because they consider white collar crimes as non-violent, they don't typically get much time, and then they almost always are released to repeat their crimes again. In my personal opinion, most white collar criminals aren't given enough time to dissuade them from doing it again, yet other people end up suffering a lifetime for the crimes that have been committed against them.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:29 AM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: opethPA

I just read this story which also had a side tidbit about Equifax. If your name was in the 140 million, you can claim 10 years of credit monitoring... I went ahead and applied for it to see if I got it.

Edit: Getting 10 years of identity protection, apparently I was part of those effected.


I just heard this week that there's some kind of settlement for those who were affected by the Equifax breach and you can sign up to receive your whopping $125.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: roadgravel
a reply to: dfnj2015

copy *.* a:

"Look, I am a hacker."

"Dude, if you want to be more l33t, use FTP."



thats a lot of 1.44MB disks your using there on that A:

i dont think she was a hacker



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: Deetermined

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: opethPA

I just read this story which also had a side tidbit about Equifax. If your name was in the 140 million, you can claim 10 years of credit monitoring... I went ahead and applied for it to see if I got it.

Edit: Getting 10 years of identity protection, apparently I was part of those effected.


I just heard this week that there's some kind of settlement for those who were affected by the Equifax breach and you can sign up to receive your whopping $125.


If your information was part of the breach, you by default can ask for one of the following
-Ten years of credit protection
-if you already have credit protection, you can instead get 125 dollars

If the breach has cost you time or money, you can provide documentation that proves such, and be awarded up to 20,000 dollars.

To be fair, I don't think it's a horrible settlement. We live in a digital age, these things are going to happen, there are also steps we can take to make sure it doesn't happen to us. As far as protecting your credit, you can freeze your credit with all three bureaus. Once frozen, no one can request your credit information until you have unfrozen them.

As far as banking is concerned, I would direct you to ketsuso's comment. There are ways to have fail safes on fail safes, and you can even select options that reimburse you should there be a breach.

I personally don't operate by trusting my defense in others, inversely I am skeptical of everyone. If you are proactive and take personal responsibility and accountability, the chances of being a victim are incredibly slim.



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: Agit8dChop

It is redirected to a 5 tetra byte drive.




edit on 7/30/2019 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 10:03 AM
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originally posted by: Deetermined

originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: opethPA

I just read this story which also had a side tidbit about Equifax. If your name was in the 140 million, you can claim 10 years of credit monitoring... I went ahead and applied for it to see if I got it.

Edit: Getting 10 years of identity protection, apparently I was part of those effected.


I just heard this week that there's some kind of settlement for those who were affected by the Equifax breach and you can sign up to receive your whopping $125.


$125, AND up to $250 more (at $25 per hour) if you can prove you spent 10 hours of your time on hack-related stuff, I think. I know it's $25 per hour, up to a 10 hour max for time spent on...something. Not recovery efforts for stolen money/ID theft, they want documentation for that. The $25 p/h one is different, I don't think it requires any proof at all, just your good word?



posted on Jul, 30 2019 @ 10:11 AM
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originally posted by: Deetermined
a reply to: opethPA


Finally your perception of what the law does with white collar crime is wrong. Grab your latest 2600 and look in the personal sections to see PenPals requests from those serving prison time for similar crimes for just one very small type of proof that those crimes are prosecuted.


I can tell you from personal experience that the Feds drag out investigations of these crimes forever and then they only prosecute one small portion of the crimes that have been committed. Because they consider white collar crimes as non-violent, they don't typically get much time, and then they almost always are released to repeat their crimes again. In my personal opinion, most white collar criminals aren't given enough time to dissuade them from doing it again, yet other people end up suffering a lifetime for the crimes that have been committed against them.


To each his or her own then.

I can tell you from personal experience that I disagree that a small portion of white collar crimes are convicted.
I also think that criminals always think they will get away with crimes and as such being a released, repeat offender isnt a failure of the legal system but a failure of the criminal. I'm also a big believer in personal accountability so that may be where the difference comes from.

Holistically neither of us is truly correct and neither of us truly wrong as the truth lies some place in the middle.

What I know for sure this criminal got caught and I hope they do the time for their crime.



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