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I have a question....just curious.

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posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 11:22 AM
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originally posted by: Argen
a reply to: theatreboy

Lol...and why is it a hot water heater...shouldn't need to heat hot water


Because it's usually so cold, they like it extra hot.

O.o




posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: Plotus

originally posted by: gallop

originally posted by: new_here
a reply to: 4891morfih

There is no telling what they call it! I learned from the British Baking Show that they call cookies "biscuits" and they call cake "sponge." LoL I do love these types of cultural differences-- makes life interesting and fun!


In Australia we call them bisuits also.. so you can imagine my disgust when I heard you guys love biscuits and gravy.. And not milk.



But surely you have sponge cake.. it's a type of cake...


Well sir, you might consider the Trump Approved version...


Orange cake? The cake you get to have AND eat? Don't mind if I do!

Or did you mean walnut cake?

I'm a bigly fan of both cakes. caaaaakee...



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: 4891morfih



We call American cheese "American cheese" some will argue it's not even cheese but whatever.

And that's what makes it American 🧀 😉
Is this the kind of thread where we talk about some people call it Pop, others call it cola or soda?? I always enjoyed the word pop, but I always seem to say soda, unless I want to remember super troopers. Then I will ask for a liter of cola at a place where drinks are not even measured that way.


Except for us who were born and raised in SE Texas- all sodas/colas/pops are referred to as cokes. Also what the rest of the country calls service roads are called feeder roads.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: GeauxHomeYoureDrunk

originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: 4891morfih



We call American cheese "American cheese" some will argue it's not even cheese but whatever.

And that's what makes it American 🧀 😉
Is this the kind of thread where we talk about some people call it Pop, others call it cola or soda?? I always enjoyed the word pop, but I always seem to say soda, unless I want to remember super troopers. Then I will ask for a liter of cola at a place where drinks are not even measured that way.


Except for us who were born and raised in SE Texas- all sodas/colas/pops are referred to as cokes. Also what the rest of the country calls service roads are called feeder roads.


That confused me when I lived there briefly because I was used to them all being sodas.

I did a double-take the first time a co-worker asked a friend to get him a coke, the friend asked what kind and the guy replied "pepsi".

~blink~

And I learned that gravy is basically a beverage in the South...




posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: new_here

There is "sponge" cake and their is Gateaux
I know which I'd rather "hoof down" with an iced Pepsi





edit on 10-7-2019 by TheConstruKctionofLight because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-7-2019 by TheConstruKctionofLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 01:55 PM
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originally posted by: GeauxHomeYoureDrunk

originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: 4891morfih



We call American cheese "American cheese" some will argue it's not even cheese but whatever.

And that's what makes it American 🧀 😉
Is this the kind of thread where we talk about some people call it Pop, others call it cola or soda?? I always enjoyed the word pop, but I always seem to say soda, unless I want to remember super troopers. Then I will ask for a liter of cola at a place where drinks are not even measured that way.


Except for us who were born and raised in SE Texas- all sodas/colas/pops are referred to as cokes. Also what the rest of the country calls service roads are called feeder roads.


Unreal, she was right... why do you call them cokes? I mean if you wanted a lemonade you'd not ask for a coke? If you said get me a coke, and wanted a lemonade and I came back with a coke, would you be pissed?

Then again B never knew what I meant by jumper, either... lol

My old dad used to call it soda pop anyway, guess he figured it out before people started to notice.. lol



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 02:05 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari

originally posted by: GeauxHomeYoureDrunk

originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: 4891morfih



We call American cheese "American cheese" some will argue it's not even cheese but whatever.

And that's what makes it American 🧀 😉
Is this the kind of thread where we talk about some people call it Pop, others call it cola or soda?? I always enjoyed the word pop, but I always seem to say soda, unless I want to remember super troopers. Then I will ask for a liter of cola at a place where drinks are not even measured that way.


Except for us who were born and raised in SE Texas- all sodas/colas/pops are referred to as cokes. Also what the rest of the country calls service roads are called feeder roads.


That confused me when I lived there briefly because I was used to them all being sodas.

I did a double-take the first time a co-worker asked a friend to get him a coke, the friend asked what kind and the guy replied "pepsi".

~blink~

And I learned that gravy is basically a beverage in the South...




Probably some ol' grizzly feller decided back in 1897 to make his own coca cola in a wood hut along the Mississippi, and went about moonshinin' his own flavour. Gave it to some folk who said "Interesting, what is it?" and he said "Coke!" and they went away... Other people heard about it and came along so he gave them some, but this time it tasted different..

"Different, what is it?"

"Coke!"...

and as word spread of this fizzy pop made by grizzly Adams, distributing all manner of home made sodas, they all became known as Coke!

Then along came huckleberry, but Mark Twain grabbed him by his collar and said......

O.o



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 03:07 PM
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a reply to: gallop
I think it's a straightforward case of brand name turning into generic name, like Hoover and Biro.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: 4891morfih
a reply to: worldstarcountry

I was born in Wisconsin and I remember everyone calling it pop, my mom still calls it pop.

Moved to Phoenix and down here everyone calls it soda, so maybe it's like a regional thing?


Yes, it's regional. It's pop here in Michigan, but I grew up in Florida, where it's coke the majority of the time, regardless of whether or not you're actually drinking/ordering a Coke. It's also soda down there to a much lesser extent.

edit on 7/10/2019 by Nyiah because: Oops, pic too big

Link to pic
edit on 7/10/2019 by Nyiah because: Second resize is the charm?



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: gallop

Lemonade would not be considered a coke unless it was carbonated. Basically anything made with fizzy water would be considered a coke- except for actual fizzy water itself because nobody drinks it there. Proper etiquette for when someone asks you for a coke is to ask them what kind. Don't get me to lying about WHY because I have no clue, neither does my 73 year old dad who was also born and raised there.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Very cool.

I was right!!!

Ta da !!!

Edit: I wonder why that is, not that I was right, but how we refer to soda.

A conspiracy!

😁



edit on 10-7-2019 by 4891morfih because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 04:06 PM
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a reply to: 4891morfih
I suppose its just carry over from what each population associated it with when carbonated beverages were becoming widespread. perhaps those who call it Pop, associated it with the sound of that pop from opening a can. Those who refer to is as soda were likely already more acclimated with drinking "soda water" or carbonated water. Some machines have a lever that say soda, and it dispenses only the carbonated water.

Those who call it coke probably were the ones where their exposure to the beverages became widespread at a time Coca-Cola beverage corp. took over and dominated the market with aggressive marketing and bringing regular access through widespread distribution.

Certainly there has to be a wasted government grant project which already studied this with millions of dollars



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
I suppose its just carry over from what each population associated it with when carbonated beverages were becoming widespread. perhaps those who call it Pop, associated it with the sound of that pop from opening a can.

It was already being called "pop" when it came in bottles. Only a few minutes ago, by chance, I was reading in the Punch of August 16th 1899, "... Unfortunately my doctor forbids me the exhilerating "pop" to which my wife and daughter were inclined", by which he means lemonade. He orders a bottle of champagne for himself, but doesn't call it "pop". On the other hand, though I haven't read the P.G. Wodehouse novels recently, I'm fairly sure that Bertie Wooster does use "pop" as a nickname for champagne.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI
hmm, and champagne does make that pop sound when you pop the cork? Now that you mention it, I get a pretty good pop often when I open a beer with a lighter. Either way, I believe its an association to the sound. I thing the timing of when certain populations began associating the beverage with relatable terms is the main reason for the different descriptive names.



posted on Jul, 10 2019 @ 09:04 PM
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We also had a kids' puppet TV programme called "Muffin The Mule".




Naturally, over time, blue comedians turned "Muffin" into a verb that kinda destroyed that initial sweet innocence!




posted on Jul, 13 2019 @ 04:20 AM
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originally posted by: GeauxHomeYoureDrunk
a reply to: gallop

Lemonade would not be considered a coke unless it was carbonated. Basically anything made with fizzy water would be considered a coke- except for actual fizzy water itself because nobody drinks it there. Proper etiquette for when someone asks you for a coke is to ask them what kind. Don't get me to lying about WHY because I have no clue, neither does my 73 year old dad who was also born and raised there.


Haha, crazy.. Wait, you have flat lemonade there, too? Eating biscuits and gravy, flat lemonade, everything else is coke.. I'd have gotten lost navigating a kitchen there..

Ironically, I love fizzy water. So much so my soda stream needs a new co2 cylinder.




posted on Jul, 13 2019 @ 05:18 AM
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originally posted by: new_here
a reply to: 4891morfih

There is no telling what they call it! I learned from the British Baking Show that they call cookies "biscuits" and they call cake "sponge." LoL I do love these types of cultural differences-- makes life interesting and fun!

Cake is cake..... but there are different cakes...... Sponge cake is not fruit cake.... Fruit cake is traditionally Chrustmas or wedding cake.



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