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This is NUTS

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posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 08:37 AM
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This is how a human brain looks like:



This is how a walnut looks like:




Do you know which nut is considered best for your brain?

Walnuts!!!!!! That's nuts bro.... How can this be a coincidence?!


Walnuts are the top nut for brain health. They have a significantly high concentration of DHA, a type of Omega-3 fatty acid. Among other things, DHA has been shown to protect brain health in newborns, improve cognitive performance in adults, and prevent or ameliorate age-related cognitive decline. One study even shows that mothers who get enough DHA have smarter kids. Just a quarter cup of walnuts provides nearly 100% of the recommended daily intake of DHA. Additional research has found that people with walnuts and walnut oil in their diets have lower resting blood pressure as well as lower blood pressure responses to stress in the laboratory.

www.brainhq.com...


8. Nuts Research has shown that eating nuts can improve markers of heart health, and having a healthy heart is linked to having a healthy brain (49Trusted Source, 50Trusted Source). A 2014 review showed that nuts can improve cognition and even help prevent neurodegenerative diseases (51Trusted Source). Also, another large study found that women who ate nuts regularly over the course of several years had a sharper memory, compared to those who didn't eat nuts (49Trusted Source). Several nutrients in nuts, such as healthy fats, antioxidants and vitamin E, may explain their brain-health benefits (52Trusted Source, 53Trusted Source). Vitamin E shields cell membranes from free radical damage, helping slow mental decline (54Trusted Source, 55Trusted Source, 56Trusted Source). While all nuts are good for your brain, walnuts may have an extra edge, since they also deliver omega-3 fatty acids (57).

www.healthline.com...


For researchers, walnuts are the top nut for brain health. Particularly, for this reason: They have a significantly high concentration of DHA, a type of Omega-3 fatty acid. Some researchers suggest that DHA may be the key to boosting your brain’s performance and preventing age-related cognitive decline. Researchers also suggest that walnuts and walnut oil may also keep reduce stress. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, reports participants who consumed walnuts and walnut oil not only reduced their LDL levels, but also showed significant drops in resting blood pressure and, most surprisingly, in their blood pressure response to stress.

www.brainfutures.org...



Praise the lord!

edit on 19-6-2019 by ReligiousQuestionDude because: .




posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: ReligiousQuestionDude


originally posted by: ReligiousQuestionDude
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yes.
edit on 19-6-2019 by FauxMulder because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: ReligiousQuestionDude

Yes.



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 08:42 AM
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T


T, where we all have to start.

Is it T + or -, in relation to what? Where does Time start.

Bold open to a tough question.



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 08:47 AM
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many people actually have walnuts for brains



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 08:52 AM
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Waiting for the paranormal plot twist...




posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: ReligiousQuestionDude

They might look similar, but they don't taste similar.



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: ReligiousQuestionDude

They might look similar, but they don't taste similar.


Agreed, brains have more of an almond taste to them if we had to compare to a nut.



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: ReligiousQuestionDude

It's not a coincidence. Everything in nature, the cosmos, etc can be found in the body and vice versa. As above so below.

Celery can be likened to bone structure, kidney beans to kidney's, Corn to teeth. Cut a carrot in half and look at the core, a bit like an eye. Many similarities. Fascinating.

edit on 19-6-2019 by TheGreatWork because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-6-2019 by TheGreatWork because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 11:33 AM
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Dessert?




posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 11:42 AM
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originally posted by: TheGreatWork
a reply to: ReligiousQuestionDude

It's not a coincidence. Everything in nature, the cosmos, etc can be found in the body and vice versa. As above so below.

Celery can be likened to bone structure, kidney beans to kidney's, Corn to teeth. Cut a carrot in half and look at the core, a bit like an eye. Many similarities. Fascinating.



That's why I eat lot's of Asparagus !



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 12:10 PM
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Mandrake



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker


Whut? They don't taste like chicken?



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 01:32 PM
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a reply to: TheGreatWork

Agree with all you listed but one... carrots! Unfortunate the myth regarding carrots being good for your eyes is just that... a myth!
Interestingly enough it started during WW2. The British were looking for ways to excuse their uncanny ability to know exactly where the German bombers would be during the air raids of London. They didn’t want the Germans to know about their newly discovered radar capabilities so they spread all kinds of disinformation. One of the campaigns convinced the Germans that British pilots ate lots of carrots in order to be able to see in the dark, thus allowing them an edge over the he German pilots.
Well It worked too well and still to this day most people are still taught a lie and believe it!
Or so I heard



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 03:55 PM
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a reply to: Cogidubnus

www.medicalnewstoday.com...


6. Carrots Carrots are rich in both Vitamin A and beta carotene. Beta carotene gives carrots their orange color. Vitamin A plays an essential role in vision. It is a component of a protein called rhodopsin, which helps the retina to absorb light. Research on beta carotene's role in vision is mixed, though the body needs this nutrient to make vitamin A.



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 04:06 PM
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I'm never eating a walnut again.



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

I’m not trying to say carrots aren’t delicious and good for you in a lot of ways.... but apparently, it looks like the whole, “exceptionally good for your eyesight” claim just isn’t true sadly. “One couldn’t eat enough carrots to ever make a difference” seems to be the scientific consensus? At best the claims have been massively over exaggerated and has little/no scientific backing. Snopes has some additional interesting info if anybody is interested! If anybody has any additional info I am all ears and would be happy to be incorrect on this matter! We must deny ignorance!

From source Snopes:
www.snopes.com...

Origins: Carrots have long been touted for their efficacy in improving eyesight, and generations of kids have been admonished to not leave them on their plates lest they end up needing glasses. But are carrots the sight-boosters popular wisdom asserts them to be? And if not, where did this belief begin?

While carrots are a good source of vitamin A (which is important for healthy eyesight, skin, growth, and resisting infection), eating them won’t improve vision.

The purported link between carrots and markedly acute vision is a matter of lore, not of science. And it’s lore of the deliberately manufactured type.

In World War II, Britain’s air ministry spread the word that a diet of these vegetables helped pilots see Nazi bombers attacking at night. That was a lie intended to cover the real matter of what was underpinning the Royal Air Force’s successes: Airborne Interception Radar, also known as AI. The secret new system pinpointed some enemy bombers before they reached the English Channel.

British Intelligence didn’t want the Germans to find out about the superior new technology helping protect the nation, so they created a rumor to afford a somewhat plausible-sounding explanation for the sudden increase in bombers being shot down. News stories began appearing in the British press about extraordinary personnel manning the defenses, including Flight Lieutenant John Cunningham, an RAF pilot dubbed “Cat’s Eyes” on the basis of his exceptional night vision that allowed him to spot his prey in the dark. Cunningham’s abilities were chalked up to his love of carrots. Further stories claimed RAF pilots were being fed godly amounts of this root vegetable to foster similar abilities in them.

The disinformation was so persuasive that the English public took to eating carrots to help them find their way during the blackouts.

There is at least a bit of something to the carrots/vision presumption: Beta-carotene, which is found in the vegetable, may help reduce the risk of cataract and macular degeneration. However, it needs be pointed out that studies which have posited this link used doses of Vitamin A or beta-carotene that were higher than what is found in the standard diet. It would be quite difficult to eat the requisite number of carrots to match this level of intake. Also, among those who suffer a Vitamin A deficiency, nyctanopia (also known as nyctalopia or night blindness; the inability to see well in poor light) can be at least somewhat helped by adding carrots to the sufferer’s diet.“

Maybe we should conduct our own experiment!?



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: Cogidubnus

Well i like this part I could do the ranch :-)



There's one more catch to vitamin A's powers. Because vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin, one needs to eat it with fat in order to fully absorb it and its benefits. Eating a raw carrot won't deliver as much vitamin A punch. "That's why you need to dip it in ranch," quips Taylor.

www.npr.org...



posted on Jun, 19 2019 @ 07:17 PM
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Funny thing is, it actually is.

Fruit are actually genitalia...

How do you like those apples!??!
edit on 19-6-2019 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2019 @ 09:04 PM
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Ginger root holds mythical medicinal status in many countries simply because it appeals to humans' superstitions due to it often appearing similar to the human form.

[shrug]

Try not to read too much into this stuff.



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