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A new upgraded Apache seems to be in the works...

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posted on May, 19 2019 @ 05:07 PM
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Boeings "new" Apache AH-64E Block Two Compound

A pusher, hence the "compound", prop design that will be significantly faster than the currant models in service. Greater range, and of course, the various electronic packages will be significantly upgraded.

The current Apache while more than just merely capable is based upon a 1970's design requirement. This new Apache while based upon the original design will offer significant changes.

another view.


Of course, the proposed aircraft does bear a striking resemblance to this ahead of its time aircraft (AH-56 Cheyenne)

What's old, is new, again....in 2028
edit on 5/19/2019 by seagull because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 19 2019 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: seagull

They're trying to throw a wrench into FVL. The Valor is basically done testing, while Boeing has barely gotten Defiant off the ground. Kind of a slight of hand trick. You see this and go, "ooo, shiny! That'll make an awesome attack helicopter" and ignore the delays to Defiant.



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: seagull

I remember playing a flight sim way back in the day called Apache Air Assault that featured this helicopter.



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

that's the impression I got as well, once I got past the "ooh, shiny!!".



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 06:38 PM
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Good, last update was over a month ago.

www.apache.org...



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 07:19 PM
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a reply to: seagull




Boeing seeks to provide an affordable means to keep the current U.S. Army medium attack helicopter, the AH-64 Apache, capable on the highly complex multi-domain battlefield of the future through 2060,” the company said in written response to questions from Rotor & Wing International. “Boeing’s objective is to offer and field new technologies which make up the advanced Apache in the late 2028 timeframe.


I'm a bit shocked that they would use Boeing and affordable in the same sentence.



posted on May, 19 2019 @ 10:27 PM
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My whole life I used to think stuff like this was COOL. Now I think it is garbage. Invent something to benefit humanity, get suicided. Build a weapon of destruction, reap the riches.



posted on May, 20 2019 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: TheGreatWork

One can say, and think, that it's cool, and at the same time, not want to see them used.

If it helps, military hardware innovations have a way of bleeding through into civilian uses.



posted on May, 20 2019 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: seagull

A lot of this work dates to the '90's. This latest iteration looks like it drops Piasecki's VTDP and goes back to a mechanical anti-torque rotor. I imagine this is represents the "low-" cost/risk path toward an interim FVL-type. Money talks, but the Army to date has been asking for things this won't/can't do. Piasecki thought they could get their version to 200 kts if they could off-load the rotor enough.
The question for the Army would basically be, is it worth it to fund, develop and field an interim type until FVL gets sorted. Is this a big enough step up from what is currently being pumped out of the Mesa plant that would justify the cost? Probably not. The boring E models or less radical upgrades can soldier on for another 20 years while FVL waits to get to IOC.

This is very similar to the F-15X proposal. An admittedly interim proposal to plug a short -term gap for the next twenty years. Of course that has worked out for them, soo...



posted on May, 20 2019 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: RadioRobert

FVL seems to be moving along rather nicely, from what I've heard and read.

I just ran across the picture of the "new" Apache, and thought it looked rather cool-- "OOOOO, shiney!"



posted on May, 20 2019 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: seagull


They don't have real requirements yet. We are 25 years away from the stated goal of IOC for a real production machine. That's the window Boeing is trying to climb through. So while the demonstrators are making progress and expanding their envelopes, there is still the gap between demonstration and having real machine built around requirements that's passed its own DemEval and is ready to go.

There's a slight possibility of moving up the timeline, but it's slim. And none if you are simultaneously funding development and DemEval of a new Apache compound.I

Hopefully it's still born.







 
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