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How many goats make 1hp, roughly

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posted on May, 11 2019 @ 06:33 AM
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We work on kilowatts in Australia so asking my associates in another country where abstract is a legal measurement, roughly how many goats will it take to equal a (1) horsepower

Doesn’t have to be accurate and I wouldn’t mind a fairly basic lesson on how we achieve the comparison

Cheers




posted on May, 11 2019 @ 06:44 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

A goat generates about 1/2 of a llama-thrust so it would be around .25 horsepower.



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:08 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

Animal Power

Best I could find. No goats though. May give you some direction for further research.

P



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:18 AM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: Raggedyman

Animal Power

Best I could find. No goats though. May give you some direction for further research.

P


Actually on this one I was trying to avoid any research, thought someone may have asked this question before and arrived at something solid if not somewhat subjective



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman
8 goats to 1 hp. Interesting search.



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:23 AM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: Raggedyman

A goat generates about 1/2 of a llama-thrust so it would be around .25 horsepower.


Is that a metric .25 or is it related to an imperial measurement, just confusing me

Cos if I read that as metric then 4 goats are not going to pull a horse, doesn’t sound like enough goats
My opinion of course


As for the Llama, about a third, definitely not a half, that’s crazy, don’t know what you are thinking 🙄



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:24 AM
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originally posted by: Tarzan the apeman.
a reply to: Raggedyman
8 goats to 1 hp. Interesting search.



That’s actually what I surmised, link?
Paydirt



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:26 AM
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I guess if the goat was put in a blender you can then burn up it's remains and measure its total amount of potential energy given off as heat?

Bonus roast smell.


edit on 11-5-2019 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

I got the answer :

1 Goat = 99 Lbs.
3 Oz of Goat = 122 Calories.
1 Lbs. = 16 Oz.
1 Calorie = 4.184 Joules.

99 Lbs. x 16 Oz = 1584 Oz.
1584 Oz / 3 = 528.
528 x 122 = 64,419 Calories for a whole Goat.
64,416 x 4.184 = 269516.544 Joules.
269516.544 Joules per second = 269516.544 watts.
269516.544 watts / 745.7 (watts per horsepower) = 361.4275767735014‬ horsepower.

….Sorta.



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:35 AM
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a reply to: Trueman

hang on, so one goat is equal to 361hp? That doesn't sound right.

I guess we need to know the usage of this goat!? Is it total amount of Joules it's mass provides? Or some sort of "alive" goat provided HP over say 10 seconds?

I'm nervous for whatever is required of the goat involved.



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:38 AM
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originally posted by: Qumulys
a reply to: Trueman
hang on, so one goat is equal to 361hp? That doesn't sound right.
I guess we need to know the usage of this goat!? Is it total amount of Joules it's mass provides? Or some sort of "alive" goat provided HP over say 10 seconds?
I'm nervous for whatever is required of the goat involved.


Goats are very strong but also very clever. They know if humans notice how strong they are, we'll put them to work like a horse.


edit on 11-5-2019 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:48 AM
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a reply to: Trueman

I think you're right, they be hiding up tree's, sprint across 80 degree cliff walls, and fainting all over the place. Lazy, but as you say, clever...

Side note, now I'm wondering what goat actually tastes like, I live in a very un-adventurous food-wise country (apart from croc, kangaroo, emu etc).

I know its quite a common food elsewhere in the world. I'm thinking it must be quite lambish?



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:53 AM
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a reply to: Qumulys

If a goat was substituted for your Sunday lamb roast, you would probably not notice.

P



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: Qumulys

They taste very good but most of dishes made of goat are strongly seasoned. Lamb just need salt on the grill.

All animals you mentioned are even better. I place near me sells kangaroo, croc and camel burgers too. Love it.



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:55 AM
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originally posted by: Qumulys
a reply to: Trueman

I think you're right, they be hiding up tree's, sprint across 80 degree cliff walls, and fainting all over the place. Lazy, but as you say, clever...

Side note, now I'm wondering what goat actually tastes like, I live in a very un-adventurous food-wise country (apart from croc, kangaroo, emu etc).

I know its quite a common food elsewhere in the world. I'm thinking it must be quite lambish?


Not to derail the ops thread but goat tastes peanuttie, i have had peanuttie lamb as well, had some chicken that was peanut flavoured, lots of Asian meats taste like peanuts



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 07:56 AM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: Qumulys
If a goat was substituted for your Sunday lamb roast, you would probably not notice.
P


Only as far as you don't see the horns.



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

Check out goat simulator. It may help you answer that



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman
The comparison is to be achieved by a straight tug-of-war.
You attach one end of a rope to the harness of your horse.
You yoke a number of goats together, attaching the other end of the rope.
A flag or large white handkerchief is tied in the middle of the rope.
By whatever effective means are available, you set both teams pulling in opposite directions.
Watching the way the flag moves, you keep adding or subtracting goats, until the flag has reached perfect equilibrium.
The number of goats in the team at this point is the answer to your question.
When you've done the experiment, please supply a video.




edit on 11-5-2019 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

You just haven't been associating with the right llamas.



posted on May, 11 2019 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

www.quora.com...
This is where I found it. But I had to ask Google a number of different ways to get there.




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