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Using GPS instead of maps is the most consequential exchange of technologies in history

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posted on May, 4 2019 @ 07:11 PM
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My husband and I have GPS but we also love using our maps when traveling. Maps make it easier to get off the interstate highways and explore new areas. We always can quickly look at map and determine a much better route to get back on track if we missed a turn from the GPS too.

A couple of years ago, I went on a trip with my daughter and was detoured off the main hwy. we didn't see any signs to get back so I asked my daughter 25 years old to check the maps. I had to pull off and stop the car, we I realized she no longer remembered how to read a map.

She certainly learned on that trip and became so excited to navigate and plot our return trip home. She was amazed at there being so much more information on a map than she ever could get from GPS.

Edit add: just needed to add though I won't give up the GPS because it is great about giving me a heads up about nearby gas stations, food, hotels, ect.

edit on 5 4 2019 by CynConcepts because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 4 2019 @ 10:12 PM
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I used to draw detailed maps of the public land and the trails. Basically I go off an outline of an old map of the area, estimate distance by paces and direction with a compass. I was pretty good at, I like cartography, that is likely a lost art now.

One of my favorite things about maps is imagining what is in an area based on the map, then see what is actually there. Even though is was usually different than what I imagined, I was never disappointed. Original place names are cool from old maps, or learning about features that are no longer there, like lakes, prairie lands, or ghost towns, etc.



posted on May, 4 2019 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

There's a secret feature in every GPS which is extremely useful. If you touch the screen on a any point it shows you a top down map of the area. You can zoom in and out and then touch a point to set as your destination. It's very useful in finding places to go fishing around lakes.



posted on May, 5 2019 @ 04:35 AM
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Its called pedestrian mode and it is not a secret in any way



posted on May, 5 2019 @ 04:49 AM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: FyreByrd

I am guilty of this.

I used to plan out trips using maps but have become addicted to my Tomtom.

Was out of town on business last month and it crapped out on me and I actually had to "think" and drive to get around.

Yes, I bought another one.

I'm one of "those" people I guess.



I know someone who was a bit worse than you DB, he used his satnav he forgot how to get just about anywhere without it, even in his home city. I don't know about the US but here in the UK our driving tests have become, in my opinion, simplified with some manoeuvres (reversing round a corner and Turn-in-the-road, formerly known as the three-point-turn) being removed and now you may have to follow Satnav for part of it...



posted on May, 5 2019 @ 04:52 AM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
a reply to: FyreByrd

There's a secret feature in every GPS which is extremely useful. If you touch the screen on a any point it shows you a top down map of the area. You can zoom in and out and then touch a point to set as your destination. It's very useful in finding places to go fishing around lakes.


Also you can select if you're driving, walking, cycling or taking public transport and will even tell you times of busses and trains. I love maps too, I think I have every OS Map of Scotland...



posted on May, 5 2019 @ 05:05 AM
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I have loved maps since the first day I started hiking - many moons ago.

As I mostly hike around the UK I use Ordnance Survey 1:25K and 1:50K. I have torn, stained and worn-out maps I still use. The detail is amazing and it's good to try and find the rock with the "cup marked stone", or the ancient barrow in the middle of nowhere.

A few years back I invested in an expensive Garmin GPS device, which I now only use when I am going on long hikes as a backup for a paper map. Last used it in a white-out when wild camping on the Brecon Beacons in Wales.

Often it's good to stop, consult a map and compass and realise you took a wrong turn three miles back, rather than staring at smartphone and never stopping to "see" where you are. That said, for short hikes I now use my smartphone, which links with Ordnance Survey maps, and actually bought the type of smartphone with the longest battery life for that purpose - it's a Sony if you're interested.

Love maps and think the skill of map reading for walkers is dying. I have helped fellow walkers (usually youngsters) who have got lost because their phones don't get a signal on the hills. Being an utter snob I usually ask whether they know which way is north... Ha ha.
edit on 5/5/2019 by paraphi because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2019 @ 05:17 AM
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I love maps too, I even created maps of imagined lands based on the layout of the furniture on my room when I was a kid.


As I don't drive I don't have much need for GPS or maps, but whenever I have to go somewhere I always look first at a map to get an idea of the area.

Technology is not really the problem, the problem is thinking that new technology makes all the previous technology obsolete. Although that happens in some cases, in most they can (and should) coexist.



posted on May, 5 2019 @ 06:01 AM
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I used to do a lot of orienteering back when i was in the Army Cadets, that was many years ago now and if I'm honest, I think it's a skill set that I have lost.

This is a topic that I've considered from time to time over the years too.




posted on May, 6 2019 @ 10:27 AM
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I use GPS, but I do like to look at my route on a map (a proper map, which can be electronic) beforehand to get an understanding about the roads I will be on and what will be around me along the way.


edit on 5/6/2019 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2019 @ 11:30 AM
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as long as something in space doesn't wipe out our technological capabilities we'll be fine without maps, risky but people prefer convenience and won't go back now after getting a taste of an easier life.



posted on May, 7 2019 @ 08:57 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on May, 7 2019 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: FyreByrd


I always use maps with compass when I am on tour of a new city especially on foot. Without them I would be screwed. Especially since when you are overseas your phone service isn't always the best. But what do I know? I am a stupid Eagle Scout military brat Army veteran that was made to learn orienteering.


I remember that story in the news about the kid lost in Iceland for days because he followed his GPS and not his common sense.



posted on May, 7 2019 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk



When I was a kid I used to love to draw fantasy maps, to just make up lands of my own. Topo maps were fun to draw because of all the shapes. I also liked drawing the Middle Earth map



posted on May, 7 2019 @ 10:04 AM
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I road dog for work about once a year 30 stops in a week with appointments. Love being able to do it at my desk and download it to my GPS. Chicago or Indy are rather large and complicated if your not from there.




posted on May, 7 2019 @ 10:06 AM
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a reply to: mikell


What is 'road dog'?



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