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Twitter Warns Michelle Malkin for Violating Pakistan’s Sharia Law on Platform

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posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 01:29 PM
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Ha ha ha. Well, that wasn't my original intent, but if you wanna start one...




posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: jacinto34

You're probably exactly right. It just seems odd that only Pakistan should be doing it.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: riiver

Censorship.

Call it whatever you like, but at the end of the day, it's still censorship.

edit on 1-3-2019 by DBCowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: riiver

i really have to agree. why is someone in one country, who is a citizen of that country, being notified about complaints about breaking laws in a country they are not in, and not a citizen of? and this is exactly why open to public internet sites, need to stop with their censoring. if someone is breaking the law in some country, let that country deal appropriately with said law breaker (which obviously that law breaker would have to actually be in that country). laws only apply to citizens and those within their countries, not to non citizens in another country. seriously what platforms like twitter should do with someone making this type of complaint is to just tell them if they think a law is being broken, to take their issue to the appropriate authorities.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: riiver

Ah - the unseen hand of censorship. Meanwhile the billionaire Twit Dorsey laughs while raking in the $.

Thats the beauty of being a global behemoth - you set the rules.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: and14263

en.wikipedia.org...





Pakistan Until 1978 Islamic law was largely restricted to personal status issues. Zia ul Haq introduced Sharia courts and made far reaching changes in the criminal justice system.[138] Articles 203a to 203j of the constitution establish a sharia court with the power to judge any law or government actions to be against Islam, and to review court cases for adherence to Islamic law.

The penal code includes elements of sharia.[139] Under article 5, section 2 of the Ordinance No. VII of 1979, whoever is guilty of zina, "if he or she is a muhsan, be stoned to death at a public place; or if he or she is not a muhsan, be punished, at a public place, with whipping numbering one hundred stripes".[140] Under a 2006 law, rape cases can be heard under civil as well as Islamic law.[141]



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: riiver

Did Twitter really send such a warning, or is it a troll?

Why would a US company cite foreign law to a US Citizen living in the US?

There is no jurisdiction of any Pakistan law that goes beyond its own borders.

Go stone someone else, I'm sure Pakistan has a backlog of those cases.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
Why does a modern tech platofrm give a rat's ass what a third world #hole stuck somewhere between the stone age and the industrial revolution thinks about their civilized western users' contributions? Screw Pakistan, screw Sharia (or Pakistan's laws based on Sharia loosely or otherwise), and frankly screw anyone so tenuously clinging to a religion that a perceived insult of their cult leader or lower case g god must be met with immediate threats and action.


Sorry for being off topic:

Why is it bad to have a representative painting or drawing of Muhammad, but it's ok to name your kid that? Wouldn't that mean that if your kid is named Muhammad, then having a picture or painting of him bad? What if you had a girl and you named her Muhammad? Is that death worthy? It's very confusing. I had asked my Muslim friend about this once, and he gave the best answer ever for it, he said; "it's because most people who practice Islam are basically playing telephone rather then learning what the religion's intent is". In his opinion Sharia is a good name for a woman, bad principals for a law, but both can be crazy if you follow either to closely.


Ok back to topic:
SO is this going to be the norm now? Going back and punishing people for something posted years ago? It's almost feels like these companies are trying many reasons to get people to delete content that has been sitting around for years in order to save up space on the servers. It may seem outlandish, but look at all the weird rules these platforms have been pushing lately in order to get people to dump old video's, postings, or other data space using bits of uselessness.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 04:16 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: riiver

Censorship.

Call it whatever you like, but at the end of the day, it's still censorship.



did it ever occur to you that maybe there were veiled threats involved in the "complaint".....or they could be trying to give a "heads-up" to these people that they have been "NOTICED" by Pakistan....they have agents in the U.S.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 04:19 PM
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Uh I don't gaf about sharia law lol


Twitter what a bastion of # holes you've become



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 04:21 PM
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Where is the breaking point? And why hasn't it happened? Are we this weak? Who will stand for actual freedom? This is ridiculous, and Twitter should be ashamed and abandoned.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 04:22 PM
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originally posted by: jimmyx

originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: riiver

Censorship.

Call it whatever you like, but at the end of the day, it's still censorship.



did it ever occur to you that maybe there were veiled threats involved in the "complaint".....or they could be trying to give a "heads-up" to these people that they have been "NOTICED" by Pakistan....they have agents in the U.S.

As opposed to the blatant threats of Sharia law?



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 05:04 PM
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It’s a good idea to stay away from Twit world.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 05:09 PM
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originally posted by: jimmyx

originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: riiver

Censorship.

Call it whatever you like, but at the end of the day, it's still censorship.



did it ever occur to you that maybe there were veiled threats involved in the "complaint".....or they could be trying to give a "heads-up" to these people that they have been "NOTICED" by Pakistan....they have agents in the U.S.


Are you serious?

I've gotten death threats on ATS for gods sake!



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 05:44 PM
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By now we all know what "side" Twitter has aligned itself to. As long as people keep using the platform they will stay empowered. The day #ria law is enforced in the USA is the day I and a whole lot of people pick up our guns.



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 05:59 PM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
Uh I don't gaf about sharia law lol


Twitter what a bastion of # holes you've become


You've likely broken several laws in both Uzbekistan and Antarctica with that post, you may now be reported and should probably get a lawyer.




posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 06:28 PM
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originally posted by: riiver

originally posted by: paraphi
A small point. The Twitter narrative does not mention Sharia law. Indeed, Pakistan's legal system is not Sharia. Could it be that Brietbart (the OPs source) is being a little disingenuous with the actuality? Surely not, eh?


It's their headline, yeah. But my point was less to do with whether the sharia part is accurate than with the idea of users in America, and American citizens, being warned that they're breaking a foreign law when posting as Americans on an American platform. (It was late, I was tired, and I guess I didn't make that clear.) I find that disturbing. Imagine how many laws world-wide there are to be invoked if we're going to play that game.


This is ANOTHER REASON that the UN leadership appears IMO to want to bring the USA to it's proverbial knees. We don't obey a Foreign country laws unless we live there. If the laws aren't in the COTUS and would violate any ones rights to free speech and free expression, we challenge them.
edit on 1-3-2019 by Justoneman because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2019 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: riiver

I’m going to guess this is going to be one of those, “this is only supposed to apply to residents of Pakistan. Somehow there was an error and it was applied globally” scenarios. At least I hope that’s what this is.



posted on Mar, 2 2019 @ 12:11 AM
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Technically, freedom of speech is only guaranteed in this country. I suppose if someone's post is viewed in another country where it is illegal, an international company may have to remove the content. I actually can see this happening, I am sure that Russia might be able to stop some stuff from being viewed in their countries, in fact, I think that any other country can stop it, including Europe if it violates their laws.

Being that we are contacting people world wide on the internet, I think it is possible that a lot of censoring may start to happen.



posted on Mar, 2 2019 @ 01:03 AM
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originally posted by: paraphi
A small point. The Twitter narrative does not mention Sharia law. Indeed, Pakistan's legal system is not Sharia. Could it be that Brietbart (the OPs source) is being a little disingenuous with the actuality? Surely not, eh?


They are not being "disingenuous" as you claim. They are reporting exactly what happened, which Malkin posted on her own twitter page with a photo of the warning from Twitter. This is NOT fake news...




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