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'A rock' hit the moon during the super blood wolf moon

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posted on Jan, 23 2019 @ 08:08 PM
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On Sunday, millions of people around the world watched as the Earth’s shadow covered the moon in a copper-reddish glow in what was known as a “super blood wolf moon.” It was the first full moon of the year (a wolf moon) and it came at a time when the moon was also closest to Earth (a super moon) and going through a lunar eclipse (a blood moon).

While observing the eclipse, however, some observers noticed a small flash on the moon. Many astronomers speculated what had happened, but one of them, Jose Maria Madiedo from the University of Huelva in Spain, quickly confirmed that it was indeed a meteorite that hit the moon.


'A rock' hit the moon during the super blood wolf moon

Meteorites hit the moon often, but are rarely seen because the moon is so bright. This is the first time astrophysicists were able to record an impact on the moon during a lunar eclipse.





posted on Jan, 23 2019 @ 08:19 PM
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Just an alien with a flash camera taking pictures of their flying saucer with the family standing outside for the picture. Can you imagine what a picture like that would be worth on earth?



posted on Jan, 23 2019 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse


I concur.




posted on Jan, 23 2019 @ 10:00 PM
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Interesting, because as I was watching through the binocs ..I did see a flash.



posted on Jan, 23 2019 @ 10:30 PM
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Very cool, especially as it's indeed the first in the history of astronomy.

Other people realised it was a meteoroid strike, as well.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Jan, 23 2019 @ 10:40 PM
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Is it consistent with previously recorded impacts?

And I'm just throwing this out there as a what if.

Or could that be the most obvious choice for an answer, but it's really the Chinese testing pocket nukes where they can't be detected with certainty.

Maybe it wasn't a munitions test, perhaps it was an explosive reaction due to a failed test of some kind.

Or maybe it was just a meteoric impact.

Are there more hires videos available, showing the approach? I didn't over look that did I?



posted on Jan, 23 2019 @ 10:55 PM
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Isn't the moon hit a certain amount of times a day? This seems just like a coincidence to me. We actually do not know this is the first time this has happened. Maybe the first time we got it recorded, which could be because of the times. I mean you cant do that in the 1920's or 30's, etc like we can now. Sorry to be a buzzkill. Neat, still.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 12:12 AM
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Super blood wolf moon...... LOL. Wait, let me guess,you are posting this United States of America.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 12:39 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Are we sure it just wasnt a dodgy pixel 🤣



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 01:10 AM
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i saw a meteor during the blood moon. I thought it crossed the path of the moon but it happened so fast. It was traveling North to South. I didn't see the flash on the moon though.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 01:25 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Just an alien with a flash camera taking pictures of their flying saucer with the family standing outside for the picture. Can you imagine what a picture like that would be worth on earth?


Yeah, but they can't show it, it's a Tesla, that they found just floating around... the owner might see.




posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 08:52 AM
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originally posted by: Pandaram
Super blood wolf moon...... LOL. Wait, let me guess,you are posting this United States of America.

Some Native American cultures have referred to the January full moon as the "Wolf Moon". Various native American tribes have names for all full Moons during a year, which was a way of tracking the seasons and year. American colonialists, especially farmers, adopted those names from the Indians. So yeah -- "Wolf Moon" is an American term.

"Supermoon" is the term used to describe when the Moon appears large due to its orbit being at or near perigee with the Earth (perigee = closest point to Earth along orbit). There is no set definition of supermoon, nor is it an official astronomical term, but astronomers lately have unofficially used it to describe a full moon that is within 24 hours of perigee.

This supermoon happened to occur during a lunar eclipse, which has long been called a blood moon by some cultures because of the reddish hue.

edit on 1/24/2019 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I don't always agree with your comments. But that was funny



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: lSkrewloosel

Aliens mooning people is funny?




posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

I had a quick look for the "largest observed lunar impact events" and found this video from 2014 and a related news article:



It'd be great news to have one of the monster impact events occur in our lifetimes. Not with any attendant Earth-bound shrapnel! Just a serious kaboom level event that people can see with the naked eye. The one in the vid and article was estimated to be 900lb so imagine how something even larger would have looked to our ancestors? It seems reasonable to assume something huge lit up the moon in the distant past and startled the natives and blew their minds.




posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

The Anglo Saxons also referred to January moon as the "Wolf Moon" because hungry wolf packs would roam the forest looking for game to hunt.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 05:07 PM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

In 1178 he medieval monk, Gervase of Canterbury, and his fellow monks witnessed impact pf large meter/asteroid on the moon

The crater Giordano Bruno is believed to have been formed by the impact



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: firerescue

There's been some dispute over what they actually saw. The thinking is something so forceful would have created tons of ejecta which would eventually light up our own skies as meteor showers.

I've read about lunar eclipses being part of recorded history going back as far as early China and Sumeria. It seems curious that people haven't recorded seeing big impacts. It's well known how the major craters were formed millions of years ago and not in the past 5000 years of recorded history. Conversely we've experienced the Shoemaker-Levy 9 event in the 1990s and it seems reasonable to think something large might have struck the Moon in the past 5k years. Obviously it's worth considering how people with access to the systems of recording events may not have been watching if such events had taken place.

I find myself recalibrating what I thought about impact rates around here. We all take it for granted that the early Solar System was heavily populated with debris and passing masses and they regularly impacted local moons and planets. Their number was reduced by such impacts and, lo, here we are in a welcomingly stable system. It's slightly more stable than I thought!!



posted on Jan, 25 2019 @ 02:24 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

The taking pictures of their ufo comment etc.



posted on Jan, 25 2019 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: scubagravy

the flash was recorded by multiple people , unless you mean a dodgy pixel on the moon projection? lol




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