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Samsung guidance shocks: fourth-quarter profit 18 percent less than market expected

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posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:19 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Yeah they are pathetically low but shouldn't we have higher inflation?

If its still easier to gain access to credit # that drive asset values higher?

So if its not driving asset values with easier access to credit why did they continue to raise it anyway?




posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

Because they have to make their money back from the Quantitative Easing to Infinity!!!

Or other speculations are that they are undermining our recent economic growth because they are a political entity and would make more if our economy crashed and they could take off their Federal Reserve hats and put on their IMF hats to bail the US out, thus furthering the globalization effort.

I have a hint for you on silver.

My family owns silver mines.

They have been closed for years.

The SECOND that silver hits a certain point, they will be opened and we will ride a 6-8 month upward curve in production to entirely saturate the market.

Then it will crash, we will have made our money and they will close again, till next time.

If you are someone that wants to keep silver around as a long-term investment, it's not boogeymen that are keeping the market artificially low.

It's just that we are not the only family that owns silver mines and everyone that does knows how to play that market.

We love silver bugs, bless their hearts.


edit on 7-1-2019 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:21 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22


When I bought my house in 2000 my mortgage was 8%plus but now they are around 3%.
In 1980 they were 18%!!!!


So you take the 15 instead of 30 year and put every quartly bonus extra bonus towards paying it off sooner.... Do that and if SHTF you can take a few months off paying the mortgage since you're ahead.

What's the point now? But lose a job or market takes a month, try skipping a few months.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:24 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

The only reason I buy silver is to sell it when the Fed decides its dropping interest rates that's it



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:24 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: Bluntone22

if people had the money they would spend it trust me, the problem is they don't

So, where is all the money?


Everyone has a smartphone now. That wasn't the case five years ago.

Most people keep them for a few years, all the sales were to flip phone hold outs and third world countries.

They used each years gains and kept the projection going in the same direction as if they could keep those sales up. Stock market is punishing them for it for being dishonest and rightfully so.

Apple got caught throttling phones so people would think they needed newer and better. A phone from 2 years ago with a new battery will do everything you need it to.


I was actually making reference to the distribution of the wealth of the country.

Increasingly, those with less need for commitment to the economy (due to their wealth) are choosing to sequester their residual cash in offshore and non-reinvestment 'stores'. This removes that cash value from the operating pool.

The rich get richer, the poor get poorer and the great middle class go into and out of debt (but more into) which feeds the few with more wealth to be squirreled away because it isn't needed for them to live.

So far, most of the tax breaks & etc favor those who are already wealthy.

Imagine an economy that wasn't dragging around millions of homeless and destitute. You could get there by giving the tax breaks to the middle and lower middle and making investment the way to ensure fiscal stability.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:25 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: Bluntone22


When I bought my house in 2000 my mortgage was 8%plus but now they are around 3%.
In 1980 they were 18%!!!!


So you take the 15 instead of 30 year and put every quartly bonus extra bonus towards paying it off sooner.... Do that and if SHTF you can take a few months off paying the mortgage since you're ahead.

What's the point now? But lose a job or market takes a month, try skipping a few months.


You can pay on the principle all you want but you still have to make the payment every month. I refinanced 3 times as the rates dropped.
Two more years and I'm done.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:28 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

You are correct

However if you bring up taxes as a vehicle to srive investments into assets you will be ridiculed by "conservatives" and called a communist

I'm not saying in for that because of they stopped bailing banks out they would stop risky lending and asset values might actually make sense for average people



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:30 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Hot damn, I haven't bought a house yet, just bought a car with a loan through a credit union and I can get ahead of payments and figured they had similar structure.

I think that should be an incentive though... But banks wouldn't like that.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:33 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

I definitely see what you're saying and you've made some great points.

But most in power find ways to screw over the little guy.

I'm not loaded, but I can make my free market decisions. I cannot however opt out of social security where I'll take a hit and put that into my own retirement plan.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:41 PM
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a reply to: [post=24092140]CriticalStinker[/postexi
Everything is great cause MAGA

Just kidding all the same systemic issue that exst before Trump are still there



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:43 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: chr0naut

You are correct

However if you bring up taxes as a vehicle to srive investments into assets you will be ridiculed by "conservatives" and called a communist

I'm not saying in for that because of they stopped bailing banks out they would stop risky lending and asset values might actually make sense for average people


I'd be a very capitalist communist, though.

LOL


Also, look at what Iceland did to the banksters. Didn't turn out too bad for the little guy.


edit on 7/1/2019 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults


Everything is great cause MAGA

Just kidding all the same systemic issue that exst before Trump are still there


That's what happens when people trust politicians as opposed to holding their elected officials (employees) accountable.

He's two years in so I haven't formed an option. I'm not pissed or thrilled.

That said, yes, we've been going down a hill for decades.
edit on 7-1-2019 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 11:10 PM
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I hope that Samsung understands that you can't get blood out of a Turnip.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 11:17 PM
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Monetary policy overall has a negligible effect on the performance of an economy overall, except for fringe cases such as those that cause "shoe leather costs" (When inflation rates are so high it causes people to attempt to use their money immediately in order for it to not lose value, or hold onto it if at all possible because it's value is increasing drastically which has never happened to my knowledge). Those cases occur when inflation is like that of Wiemar Germany, Zimbabwe , or currently in Venezuela.

In the broad range where daily prices are not effected greatly by inflation or interest rates, monetary supply again is not really an issue due to the usage of banks and digital banking, where monetary velocity could theoretically be infinite, and due to this only at the extreme fringes of inflation or interest does it have an actual effect on economic value of goods or services.

As for entering a deflationary period, I find that hard to swallow, as that would require an economy wide retraction, which frankly isn't occurring. Certainly there are sectors that are suffering (tech and finance) however the rest of the economy is still moving upwards overall in terms of GDP in spite of a stock market retraction that is mostly related to bad news in the tech sector (lots of information leaks etc) and the financial sector that has buoyed itself by investing in both the tech sector and itself through large amounts of trade volume rather than adding actual value, falling into something of a velocity loop of buying and selling with no real overall gain other than market share.

www.bea.gov...
www.bea.gov...

This increase of market share should be evident via ETFs (Exchange Trade Funds for those of you in rio linda). The increasing popularity of ETFs among the financial sector should be the one thing that show that the markets no longer directly reflect the actual market values, and are all derivative function based trading rather than actual value trading. That alone should tell ordinary people that the stock market is not something normal people should be a part of, nor something that you can actively gain from in the short or even mid term.

The best way I can describe ETFs in a simple way is buying stocks in an organization that is based on stock valuation. Let that sink in a bit, it is trading for trading sake, rather than trading for the sake of actual valuation or investment, and the ETF market is massive and continuing to grow.
edit on 8-1-2019 by dubiousatworst because: edited format



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 11:36 PM
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originally posted by: dubiousatworst
Monetary policy overall has a negligible effect on the performance of an economy overall, except for fringe cases such as those that cause "shoe leather costs" (When inflation rates are so high it causes people to attempt to use their money immediately in order for it to not lose value, or hold onto it if at all possible because it's value is increasing drastically which has never happened to my knowledge). Those cases occur when inflation is like that of Wiemar Germany, Zimbabwe , or currently in Venezuela.
In the broad range where daily prices are not effected greatly by inflation or interest rates, monetary supply again is not really an issue due to the usage of banks and digital banking, where monetary velocity could theoretically be infinite, and due to this only at the extreme fringes of inflation or interest does it have an actual effect on economic value of goods or services.
As for entering a deflationary period, I find that hard to swallow, as that would require an economy wide retraction, which frankly isn't occurring. Certainly there are sectors that are suffering (tech and finance) however the rest of the economy is still moving upwards overall in terms of GDP in spite of a stock market retraction that is mostly related to bad news in the tech sector (lots of information leaks etc) and the financial sector that has buoyed itself by investing in both the tech sector and itself through large amounts of trade volume rather than adding actual value, falling into something of a velocity loop of buying and selling with no real overall gain other than market share.
www.bea.gov...
www.bea.gov...

This increase of market share should be evident via ETFs (Exchange Trade Funds for those of you in rio linda). The increasing popularity of ETFs among the financial sector should be the one thing that show that the markets no longer directly reflect the actual market values, and are all derivative function based trading rather than actual value trading. That alone should tell ordinary people that the stock market is not something normal people should be a part of, nor something that you can actively gain from in the short or even mid term.

The best way I can describe ETFs in a simple way is buying stocks in an organization that is based on stock valuation. Let that sink in a bit, it is trading for trading sake, rather than trading for the sake of actual valuation or investment, and the ETF market is massive and continuing to grow.


Argh, text wall!!!

Literally almost impossible to bring myself to read this



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults
Their excuse for increasing rates was that foreign entities were selling their US Treasuries. What this implicates is that the FED is being squeezed, and their bonds (read loans for congress to spend more money) need a higher valuation or return in order to sell. By increasing interest rates, it creates an incentive to buy the Treasuries, and allows Congress to spend more money.

The problem is that Treasury bonds really are not suffering, and are being bought up by US citizens rather than foreign entities like in the past. In spite of the news of doom and gloom over China, Japan, and Russia (and others) dumping these instruments of debt, American citizens are actually buying them. The yield curve for long term US treasuries is actually still quite low, while the short term are the only ones that are high, meaning long term confidence in the US economy remains high.


edit on 8-1-2019 by dubiousatworst because: format



posted on Jan, 8 2019 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: toysforadults




Also... Look at the price of gas. We are headed for a deflationary period


Huh? The current price of hydrocarbons is a function of supply; a supply glut of shale hydrocarbons soon-to-be coming online, coupled with ever increasing domestic crude oil production is the primary driver of the price of hydrocarbons.

Zero to do with forward looking deflationary pressures...hell, there’s so much supply that the Canadians are actively looking for price-controls because producers can’t cover transportation costs. Extraction costs have defied ‘peak oil theory’ predictions.



posted on Jan, 8 2019 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: Anathros

originally posted by: dubiousatworst
Monetary policy overall has a negligible effect on the performance of an economy overall, except for fringe cases such as those that cause "shoe leather costs" (When inflation rates are so high it causes people to attempt to use their money immediately in order for it to not lose value, or hold onto it if at all possible because it's value is increasing drastically which has never happened to my knowledge). Those cases occur when inflation is like that of Wiemar Germany, Zimbabwe , or currently in Venezuela.
In the broad range where daily prices are not effected greatly by inflation or interest rates, monetary supply again is not really an issue due to the usage of banks and digital banking, where monetary velocity could theoretically be infinite, and due to this only at the extreme fringes of inflation or interest does it have an actual effect on economic value of goods or services.
As for entering a deflationary period, I find that hard to swallow, as that would require an economy wide retraction, which frankly isn't occurring. Certainly there are sectors that are suffering (tech and finance) however the rest of the economy is still moving upwards overall in terms of GDP in spite of a stock market retraction that is mostly related to bad news in the tech sector (lots of information leaks etc) and the financial sector that has buoyed itself by investing in both the tech sector and itself through large amounts of trade volume rather than adding actual value, falling into something of a velocity loop of buying and selling with no real overall gain other than market share.
www.bea.gov...
www.bea.gov...

This increase of market share should be evident via ETFs (Exchange Trade Funds for those of you in rio linda). The increasing popularity of ETFs among the financial sector should be the one thing that show that the markets no longer directly reflect the actual market values, and are all derivative function based trading rather than actual value trading. That alone should tell ordinary people that the stock market is not something normal people should be a part of, nor something that you can actively gain from in the short or even mid term.

The best way I can describe ETFs in a simple way is buying stocks in an organization that is based on stock valuation. Let that sink in a bit, it is trading for trading sake, rather than trading for the sake of actual valuation or investment, and the ETF market is massive and continuing to grow.


Argh, text wall!!!

Literally almost impossible to bring myself to read this


sorry. there are paragraphs there, just not spaced out. Is the general consensus on this site double spacing between paragraphs? If so noted.



posted on Jan, 8 2019 @ 12:36 AM
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They came out with too many phones too fast. I firmly believe that there's a ceiling on gaming consoles, computers, and smartphones, that they can "max out" for a while.

Can the graphics really get much better on the current gen gaming consols? Let's face it. What can they possibly add in the way of options, multiplayer gaming, or graphics that would be a major leap ahead?

The same goes for PC and smartphone. How many editions of Windows can they possibly release? It's never a masterpiece to use for a decade? As for phones, the screens cant get much bigger, the operating systems are going to stay mostly the same. Yes, the Galaxy series got faster each generation, but now everything from the S7 onwards is stupid fast. How much faster can they possibly get?

Corporations like Samsung, Apple, Microsoft etc have to be struggling with this question because there's no way to maintain their profits, size, and stock value indefinitely. There aren't many new technologies that are relevant and usable by the masses left to create, discover, and utilitize. It's a scary thought.
edit on 1/8/2019 by r0xor because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2019 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: dubiousatworst




The yield curve for long term US treasuries is actually still quite low, while the short term are the only ones that are high, meaning long term confidence in the US economy remains high.


You just described an inverted yield curve — maybe you ‘misspoke’ — and it means the exact opposite of your above quote.


And are you sure US citizens are buying up US public debt over-and-above sovereign states? The Chinese still love themselves some T-Bills.



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