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Martha just gave everyone bad bad advice on Thanksgiving Turkey

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posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 02:07 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: CriticalStinker

I never thought eggs were bad regardless of what the news said.
I do think washing turkey is a bad thing. Most people are real splashy when they do it and those particles go everywhere. This year there seems to be a bad salmonella outbreak too, I personally, wouldn't chance it.

I always err on the safe side with poultry. I don't stuff my turkey either, i've always made dressing instead.


Don't most people cut open the turkey package with all of the liquids and take out the package inside stuff in the sink anyway?
I think the point is to clean the sink area with bleach after like we used to before becoming vegetarian.




posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 02:07 PM
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sanatizer

its really not a big deal unless your trying to when everything else is cooking

basic good cooking practises would eliminate any problem



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767




Sorry I can not resist, the image with the chickens' and the knife did it.


All the young people are like what the heck is with that creepy puppet! LOL



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 02:15 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: IAMTAT
Martha's own daughter said there was never anything to eat at home and she was always hungry!

Your story of Martha, reminded me of my story with Oprah. I really liked her at the time, this was the early 1990's, most people actually liked her at that time.

I finally got a ticket to one of her shows. They were free but there was always a wait to get one. I finally go there, and she was an absolute A$$. I could not believe how downright mean she was to her guests, including one child. I'd normally brush it off as someone just having a bad day, but you could just tell this was her normal behavior. After that I refused to watch her anymore. Oddly enough I get her magazines, O magazine. I didn't order them, but I assume they replaced another magazine with hers. As soon as it comes in the mail I used it to line the bottom of my trash bin!


LOL.
Martha was always pretty nice to me (my family were mutual friends with her and her husband)...but she wasn't always so friendly with pretty women (like my wife) that worked for her husband.

Her husband was a total letch...and I felt sorry for her being married to him at the time.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT




And it gets worse. The FSIS directive also reveals that chlorine gas is used on beef "primals," giblets and "salvage parts" and for "reprocessing contaminated poultry carcasses." Bon appétit.

Yep why chicken nuggets which are formed are so low in price!

Just one location (machine separate, soak in bleach, add flavor. mold nuggies and sell)



A total of 3.3 million or 70.95% of the bird population was culled or recorded as dead.

www.fin24.com...



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 02:38 PM
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Brine the turkey. Wrap it in a lattice-work of bacon. Stuff it with a small cornish game hen (so you can play a joke on the little ones and say it was pregnant...) - Baste it a lot.

Yum.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 02:47 PM
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We'll spatchcock ours, use an herb rub underneath the skin, and baste it well. Whole thing should take three hours or less.

Then we'll have the backbone and giblets and carcass to make stock with on Friday.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 03:22 PM
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Another fun thing to do. Slice a lemon in half, and put each half under the skin where the breasts are. Makes nice boobs. I know it sounds like I'm joking, but seriously, it's funny as hell.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 04:34 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: CharlesT

It's not just about the turkey itself. When you wash turkey or any poultry you are slashing that salmonella juice everywhere. You may not even realize you are doing it.
Not just in the sink, but counters, floors, on yourself. You may not realize it's on your shirt and then you rub the counter, or a fork, and boom salmonella poisoning.


If you don't wipe everything within splash & splatter range down after you handle raw meat, you're asking for trouble.

It's not bad advice, I rinse my poultry off and pat it dry before grilling. Hell if I know if I'm actually doing anything beneficial in reality, but I swear the combo leads to a nice crispy grilled skin as opposed to leaving it alone.

And I wipe everything down anywhere near the sink when I'm done. Dish soap & hot water, Lysol wipes, whatever I got, I use it. It's just good common sense for bacteria control. If you don't clean up after you prep meat, that's on you.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
I've some history with Martha...(I used to steal her hors d'oeuvres when she catered book parties at her husband's company).

At the time, my wife worked for her husband in NYC...and, when these book parties were happening at the office, I'd come up to pick up my wife from work and fill the pockets of my old army jacket with Martha's canapes.

After the parties, there was plenty of food left over, and employees could take the leftovers home.

Back then, we were on a tight budget and living in Manhattan...so we'd end up eating Martha's leftovers for a couple of days.
Her food looked pretty...but few people ate her stuff at the parties...and there was always plenty to take home.

TRUST me...her food looks better than it tastes and it was always all about presentation, rather than flavor...so hygiene was most-likely not a major consideration either.






But that is Julia Child



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm


Many bacteria are quite loosely attached and when you rinse these foods the bacteria will be spread around your kitchen.


What the hell type of hose sprayer does the FDA think people own in their kitchens? When we wash the bird, we don't take it on a tour of the kitchen while doing so, splashing and spraying rebounded turkey water hilly nilly like a spastic clown with a seltzer bottle. It's confined to the deep sink, which is then washed with a little bleach before the rest of the food is prepared in the kitchen. This really seems like the FDA believes most Americans are utterly clueless and incompetent in their kitchens.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

It doesn't take much .

It is teeny tiny drops of water & turkey juice that can go airborne and get on you, your counters, your faucet.
Also a lot of people just don't wash their hands well after handling raw meat.

They have done numerous tests showing how absolutely filthy kitchen sinks/sponges and things in the kitchen are. These are clean looking kitchens, but when tested in a lab are harboring tons and tons of germs/bacteria/salmonella.

www.foodandwine.com...


“There’s more E. coli in a kitchen sink than in a toilet after you flush it.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 05:53 PM
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I grew up hillbilly stylie.
Grab a bird and yank its head off.
Pluck it and feed the guts to the dogs.
Soup is on.
Nobody ever got sick.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 06:12 PM
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I suppose I'm the ONLY person who hauls their turkey to the back yard and hoses it off. Well, that surely surprises me.

Then, I submerge it in a 10-gallon clean bucket of salted and soy sauced water to brine it overnight. I do NOT worry about keeping it cool. The next morning I will stuff it with onion and season it and start it baking.

This has failed to kill me for .......... 60 years. I presume that because I learned this method from my Mom, that she did it before I remember.

Mom has always been big on hosing things off. I think it's a satisfactory method of spreaking the bacterium and other germs outside. Be sure to wipe your feet, now.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 07:25 PM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy

originally posted by: IAMTAT
I've some history with Martha...(I used to steal her hors d'oeuvres when she catered book parties at her husband's company).

At the time, my wife worked for her husband in NYC...and, when these book parties were happening at the office, I'd come up to pick up my wife from work and fill the pockets of my old army jacket with Martha's canapes.

After the parties, there was plenty of food left over, and employees could take the leftovers home.

Back then, we were on a tight budget and living in Manhattan...so we'd end up eating Martha's leftovers for a couple of days.
Her food looked pretty...but few people ate her stuff at the parties...and there was always plenty to take home.

TRUST me...her food looks better than it tastes and it was always all about presentation, rather than flavor...so hygiene was most-likely not a major consideration either.






But that is Julia Child


I know.
It's bizarre...and I like it.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 08:08 PM
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originally posted by: argentus
I suppose I'm the ONLY person who hauls their turkey to the back yard and hoses it off. Well, that surely surprises me.


In our defense, many of us live in places that are sub freezing by Thanksgiving day (some of us more sub than others) and all we could do with the hoses in the back yard is beat the germs off the bird with ice shafts shooting out of a frozen solid garden hose while trying to avoid refreezing a thawed bird (and also refreezing a thawed Burd in my case.)



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 08:34 PM
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originally posted by: argentus
Mom has always been big on hosing things off.


"It puts the stuffing in the turkey otherwise it gets the hose."



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 09:22 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
I grew up hillbilly stylie.
Grab a bird and yank its head off.
Pluck it and feed the guts to the dogs.
Soup is on.
Nobody ever got sick.

Indeed. Beheaded birds were dropped into a hot vat of water to make the quills easier to pull out. Pluck those things and straight to the kitchen sink to be cut apart. Guts in one bowl and giblets in another. There was cleaning up yes, but this obsession with disinfection of every surface? Nope. I've never had food poisoning.

Grew up on my grandparents farm for the most part. Us kids were dirt magnets. Played out in the barn with the chickens and turkeys, sat in the dirt and held the newly hatched chickies, gathered the eggs every morning, caught snakes and lizards out in the wild.

All those sources of Salmonella and nary a problem despite washing my hands as much as a child on the go did back then. Like... only if forced, heh.

Our society has become it's own worse nightmare. Too much cleanliness has set up situations where our immune systems can't cope with the bacterial flora around us.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 05:25 AM
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Hell no!
I am a responsible adult and I WASH all my meats especially poultry. You have no idea where your meats/poultry have been or what a lazy under paid butcher did with it (not saying ALL butchers but there could always be that one) but you never know especially where I buy my meat. I take very good precautions after washing my turkey not to splash water around and everything gets bleached and sanitized. I dislike Martha she's a big sell out, but she's right in my eyes here wrong or right I will be washing my poultry, always.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 09:46 AM
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originally posted by: Subrosabelow

originally posted by: skunkape23
I grew up hillbilly stylie.
Grab a bird and yank its head off.
Pluck it and feed the guts to the dogs.
Soup is on.
Nobody ever got sick.

Indeed. Beheaded birds were dropped into a hot vat of water to make the quills easier to pull out. Pluck those things and straight to the kitchen sink to be cut apart. Guts in one bowl and giblets in another. There was cleaning up yes, but this obsession with disinfection of every surface? Nope. I've never had food poisoning.

Grew up on my grandparents farm for the most part. Us kids were dirt magnets. Played out in the barn with the chickens and turkeys, sat in the dirt and held the newly hatched chickies, gathered the eggs every morning, caught snakes and lizards out in the wild.

All those sources of Salmonella and nary a problem despite washing my hands as much as a child on the go did back then. Like... only if forced, heh.

Our society has become it's own worse nightmare. Too much cleanliness has set up situations where our immune systems can't cope with the bacterial flora around us.



Farm turkey, and the turkey you get from the store are very different. There was a study that showed that the birds in store had an unbelievable amount of bacteria vs. the kind you butcher on the farm and prepare shortly after. Some of the turkeys at the store are actually quite old

firstwefeast.com...



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