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Bermuda Triangle mystery 'solved,' scientists claim

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posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 06:26 AM
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It was 1997 that science finally caught up with old sailors tales about rogue waves. By using satellites they were able to measure monster waves of the Cape of Southern Africa. The article goes along way to explain ship losses and I agree.. Now if they can come up with something that would help explain the missing aircraft it will be a win win.


British scientists believe 100ft ‘rogue’ waves could be the reason why so many boats have been sunk in the mysterious Bermuda Triangle.

www.foxnews.com...
youtu.be...


I get sea sick just watching some of this stuff and I used to do a lot of sailing !! youtu.be...


How would you like to be in your 42 foot Ketch rigged Sloop far from land and facing stuff like this ? I hung up my sailing spurs and the idea of sailing the world after retirement simply because I just did !!

youtu.be...


They used to believe 80 foot was the max wave height but they now realize that 120 feet is attainable. That is a 12 story building heading your way !

Bad bad day if you get caught by something like that




posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I read this article yesterday and I dont disagree that Rogue waves can account for a lot of incidents, but they have no bearing on the 100s of aircraft that have disappeared too, unless we are expected to believe they were flying under 100'
edit on 3-8-2018 by BlueJacket because: sp



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

I was thinking that too, I'm not sure if there are similarities of when those aircraft got lost. Maybe hurricanes or strong storms?

Most of those aircraft were lost before they had a high flight ceiling? (someone correct me if I'm wrong). So good chance they were flying under clouds? (again, correct me if needed) Hopefully Zaphod will comment on this thread.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 06:43 AM
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Ever since aircraft no longer had to rely on radio to get its locations the strange disappearances of planes have stopped. The only thing that happens now is plane crashes in thunderstorms. I think a large part of the problem with the triangle is it would mess with radio signals causing planes to lose their beacons.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 06:52 AM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: BlueJacket

I was thinking that too, I'm not sure if there are similarities of when those aircraft got lost. Maybe hurricanes or strong storms?

Most of those aircraft were lost before they had a high flight ceiling? (someone correct me if I'm wrong). So good chance they were flying under clouds? (again, correct me if needed) Hopefully Zaphod will comment on this thread.


During WW2 Bombers were flying at or around 25,000 for their missions over Europe. These waves would not have any effect on an aircraft except for the storms that produce them. Some of the storms could rip you wings off... That's an old aviation saying.
This is a weird story.. youtu.be...



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:14 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

the thing that jumps to mind is tropical storms, which have large thunderstorms and lightning discharges
im sure this would result in an EMP effect and wrecking the planes electronics!
only thing I can think of , that region has been plagued by storms since we started sailing that area !

the place has a history of tropical storms !
list of hurricanes in bermuda



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:20 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I have read other scientific explinations of this too. Planes would have to be flying REALLY low to get hit by a wave.






posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Wow! I remember watching the documentaries on 'rogue waves' back in the late 90s. They cured the last traces of my earlier Bermuda Triangle fascination (Berlitz you asshole!).

Imagine being on deck and some 200ft wall of water is the last thing you ever see? Water's like a rock surface if you jump into it from a great height so these waves would be like massive concrete fly-swatters. Just think, if you survived the smash, you get to drown whilst being sucked down by the displacement.

The last thing you might hear would be your last breath screaming out in bubbles.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:29 AM
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I was under the impression that years ago it was stated the cause was gas bubbling up in the waster, which then reduced the buoyancy properties of the water, thus sinking the ships. This could also interfere with flights as the bubbles are released up into the atmosphere. Not sure how bubbles / gas release would interfere with compasses and other instrumentation, unless what was causing the bubble release had some sort of magnetic properties.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:36 AM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: 727Sky

I read this article yesterday and I dont disagree that Rogue waves can account for a lot of incidents, but they have no bearing on the 100s of aircraft that have disappeared too, unless we are expected to believe they were flying under 100'


Another theory presented the idea of undersea quakes displacing gases. The rising bubbles would lower the buoyancy of the water which had two effects on ships. The first was obviously the ship would sink without warning. The second was there'd be limited wreckage, no lifeboats and the settling sea floor would effectively bury any traces of the poor vessels.

How would this effect planes? The released gases would also change the atmosphere for a brief amount of time, but long enough to lose altitude and swift enough to prevent emergency actions. To be fair, I'm not sure what a pilot could do if the aircraft suddenly behaved like it was, say, 10% heavier due to a decrease in lift and thrust. Hard to train for...

I remember a documentary that used scale models to test the hypothesis of released gases. The ships certainly sank although I can't say for certain if they also demonstrated effects on air traffic.

ETA - Hail Cuthlu!! We had the same idea

edit on 8.3.2018 by Kandinsky because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:43 AM
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originally posted by: CthulhuMythos
I was under the impression that years ago it was stated the cause was gas bubbling up in the waster, which then reduced the buoyancy properties of the water, thus sinking the ships. This could also interfere with flights as the bubbles are released up into the atmosphere. Not sure how bubbles / gas release would interfere with compasses and other instrumentation, unless what was causing the bubble release had some sort of magnetic properties.


If it were an underground volcanic eruption, then all that molten rock suddenly solidify on contact with water would generate bubbles and the eruption itself would change the local magnetic field.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:49 AM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: CthulhuMythos
I was under the impression that years ago it was stated the cause was gas bubbling up in the waster, which then reduced the buoyancy properties of the water, thus sinking the ships. This could also interfere with flights as the bubbles are released up into the atmosphere. Not sure how bubbles / gas release would interfere with compasses and other instrumentation, unless what was causing the bubble release had some sort of magnetic properties.


If it were an underground volcanic eruption, then all that molten rock suddenly solidify on contact with water would generate bubbles and the eruption itself would change the local magnetic field.


Do you remember the disappearance of Flight 19 and the planes that went to help and vanished? Never been seen again. If I recall correctly, they lost their sense of up or down and their compasses stopped working properly. I'd have to look it up and could be wrong. The point I'm getting at is it seems like some very unusual conditions arose that didn't involve volcanic activity. Perhaps such phenomena are very, very rare and too infrequent for anyone to study? The only witnesses tend to disappear...presumably down to Davy Jones Locker...ahar ahar.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:50 AM
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originally posted by: Kandinsky

originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: 727Sky

I read this article yesterday and I dont disagree that Rogue waves can account for a lot of incidents, but they have no bearing on the 100s of aircraft that have disappeared too, unless we are expected to believe they were flying under 100'


Another theory presented the idea of undersea quakes displacing gases. The rising bubbles would lower the buoyancy of the water which had two effects on ships. The first was obviously the ship would sink without warning. The second was there'd be limited wreckage, no lifeboats and the settling sea floor would effectively bury any traces of the poor vessels.

How would this effect planes? The released gases would also change the atmosphere for a brief amount of time, but long enough to lose altitude and swift enough to prevent emergency actions. To be fair, I'm not sure what a pilot could do if the aircraft suddenly behaved like it was, say, 10% heavier due to a decrease in lift and thrust. Hard to train for...

I remember a documentary that used scale models to test the hypothesis of released gases. The ships certainly sank although I can't say for certain if they also demonstrated effects on air traffic.

ETA - Hail Cuthlu!! We had the same idea


I think we are both remembering the same documentary, was years ago I saw it, when I was a teenager!



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:51 AM
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Duplicate due to browser crash when saving reply now deleted

edit on 3-8-2018 by CthulhuMythos because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:55 AM
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a reply to: stormcell
So volcanic release of lava / gas could fit the bill then.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Thanks for making this thread! Great collection of videos. Some of those cruise ship clips make me worry about my 74 year-old parents who like to take cruises. That one snippet from the inside of a cruise ship, where the people and everything (chairs, tables, couple of pianos?!!) are sliding violently from one side of the ship to the other, over and over again....it's humorous if you don't think about the people in there going through that. But my question is, do they not have provisions to strap things down? At least some of the larger items, like those pianos? Seems like they would have at least a little warning and be able to strap some things down. Do cruise ships so rarely encounter rough waters that they don't plan for that? Because that clip is just nuts.

I did a report on Flight 19 when I was in 9th grade. We had to read them aloud to the class and everyone including the teacher was fascinated and asked me tons of questions. I remember little about what was in the report, but I do remember thinking even then that they probably just got disoriented and flew out to sea and ran out of fuel.

I have to think the disappearances of planes in the Bermuda Triangle has to be things along those lines. Seems like as communication equipment, etc., has gotten more sophisticated that we don't hear as much of planes lost in the Bermuda Triangle anymore.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 08:16 AM
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originally posted by: CthulhuMythos

originally posted by: Kandinsky

originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: 727Sky

I read this article yesterday and I dont disagree that Rogue waves can account for a lot of incidents, but they have no bearing on the 100s of aircraft that have disappeared too, unless we are expected to believe they were flying under 100'


Another theory presented the idea of undersea quakes displacing gases. The rising bubbles would lower the buoyancy of the water which had two effects on ships. The first was obviously the ship would sink without warning. The second was there'd be limited wreckage, no lifeboats and the settling sea floor would effectively bury any traces of the poor vessels.

How would this effect planes? The released gases would also change the atmosphere for a brief amount of time, but long enough to lose altitude and swift enough to prevent emergency actions. To be fair, I'm not sure what a pilot could do if the aircraft suddenly behaved like it was, say, 10% heavier due to a decrease in lift and thrust. Hard to train for...

I remember a documentary that used scale models to test the hypothesis of released gases. The ships certainly sank although I can't say for certain if they also demonstrated effects on air traffic.

ETA - Hail Cuthlu!! We had the same idea


I think we are both remembering the same documentary, was years ago I saw it, when I was a teenager!


Yeah


Sounds exactly the same. if I wasn't in a very lazy mood I'd go and search for it on IMDB or YT. Not today lol.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 08:29 AM
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The Jacksonville Op Area is in the area called the "Bermuda Triangle". I was on a detachment on the Forrestal in the mid 80's. It was about 2 AM, a clear night, stars all over the place. Then in just a few minutes it was like being in a black cloth bag. No stars, no lights and no visible horizon, Then just as suddenly as it happened we were back to normal. The whole thing lasted about 5 minutes. I have no idea what it was or what caused it.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 08:31 AM
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a reply to: CthulhuMythos

Actually if I remember correctly it was the sudden release of frozen methane hydrates that they theorized was producing the bubbles that could sink ships. Off the coast of Norway along the ocean floor there are massive craters from possible methane eruptions.
youtu.be...


There was also a test where they took a radial engine much like flight 19 was powered by and started pumping methane into the air intake.. It had no effect on the engine until they pumped an impossible amount in.. The engine died after spitting and sputter for a while. But the test was a bust as far as proving methane was responsible for aircraft losses.

One thing about methane bubbles coming to the surface is some of their effect on buoyancy is offset by the rapid rise of the bubbles. They tried to sink a boat in Florida using a matrix of air tubes that could turn the water into almost 25% air... The boat rode on the bubbles and did not sink !! youtu.be...



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I found this article intriguing.www.mirror.co.uk...
You peaked my interest. I started digging looking into the Cyclops sinking. I was curious if there were storms present at the time. Then I came across the Puerto Rican trench, which could easily play into the giant waves. Which let me to this link I posted above.

Thanks for posting.............S&F




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