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Anyone know a thing about direct burial cable?

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posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 04:53 PM
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I have some direct burial ethernet cable - Regular electrical codes don't apply, it's carrying only a few volts, and I'm not digging near any other lines at all ( had it checked/marked )

My question is, how shallow can I bury it, so it's not disturbed by vehicles driving above? ( private residence, gravel drive way)

Also, our frost line is 30 inches.. This stuff is filled with gel though, do I need to go deeper than 30 inches still? Or am I good to go 18 inches, a foot, or less? ( The more shallow I can go and rely on this cord for a while, the better. )
edit on 1-8-2018 by deadlyhope because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: deadlyhope
I have some direct burial ethernet cable - Regular electrical codes shouldn't apply, it's carrying only a few volts.

My question is, how shallow can I bury it, so it's not disturbed by vehicles driving above? ( private residence, gravel drive way)

Also, our frost line is 30 inches.. This stuff is filled with gel though, do I need to go deeper than 30 inches still? Or am I good to go 18 inches, a foot, or less? ( The more shallow I can go and rely on this cord for a while, the better. )


16 or 17 feet at least.
in case of a mudslide



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 04:57 PM
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Better to put it in PVC under a drive or any other area that sees heavy traffic. If rocks, stone, glass or anything similar is next to the cable could spell eventual problems. Mine is only inches deep and no problems so far.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 04:58 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT

Oh sounds good, thanks!



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

6-8 inches

www.lifewire.com...

next question

sorry i was off 200 inches



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 05:24 PM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: deadlyhope

6-8 inches

www.lifewire.com...

next question

sorry i was off 200 inches


It was a good joke.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT
Better to put it in PVC under a drive or any other area that sees heavy traffic. If rocks, stone, glass or anything similar is next to the cable could spell eventual problems. Mine is only inches deep and no problems so far.


I went with PVC pipe for the majority of the run and steel pipe under anywhere anyone would be driving.

I was probably over-constructing... but I like to only bury things once.

I was also told 6-8 inches (nod to TST)




posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 05:57 PM
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18 inches in pvc would be fine.

www.xwalk.com...



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:15 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT
Better to put it in PVC under a drive or any other area that sees heavy traffic. If rocks, stone, glass or anything similar is next to the cable could spell eventual problems. Mine is only inches deep and no problems so far.


Shovel deep is plenty. Just keep rocks, glass etc. away from it. PVC under drives and heavy traffic areas.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:17 PM
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I actually built one of the first large scale community networks in the UK some years ago (got a medal off the queen for it
) but did use reinforced direct burial cables on a number of occasions usually across driveways or gravel roads. I buried them about 2 foot down and still used further reinforcement of hosepipes where there was an increased risk of damage. But they worked for years without a problem. With your frost layer being 30 inches I would simply go for below that, it's not too deep with a mini digger.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:35 PM
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I would say 18 inches minimum and reference NEC article 830 table 830.47.

However, the telecom companies probably paid off the NFPA and there is an exemption included in the article which basically says broadband networking cable can basically be laid right on the surface or just beneath the grass/leaves or anywhere really without being technically against code.

Which is generally what the cable companies do when they have to run a new line to your house - bury it about an inch or two deep if that. Ive seen them just put it underneath freshly laid sod and call it good lmao.
edit on 1-8-2018 by Lightdhype because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

Some advice:

Make sure you do an 'as-con' drawing prior to back-filling any trenches. An as-con shows configuration, lengths and distances-off of the entire cable run you're intending on doing. Put it in a plastic sleeve and tape it to the inside of your meterbox.

If you ever sell your property, this information is gold for the next owners.

Do it for all electrical & plumbing groundworks.

In Australia (and I assume elsewhere), new-build dwellings have separate plumbing and electrical as-cons provided to the new homeowners as part of their handover package.

Truly valuable info.

and you get to pay it forward too, so its a win-win.

FYI, 150mm minimum depth below finish floor level is considered sufficient for residential construction (electrical should be at 600mm depth, and placed in conduit, then danger tape put over the top prior to backfilling) but since its your place, as long as the family knows its there, thats good enough. I would definitely lay it in a conduit though, too much moisture in the ground so it will increase the risk of electrical failure without a conduit.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

I'd put the cable in some pvc pipe.

We had a sign guy go right through our T-1 once when digging a post for a sign.

Better safe than sorry



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: deadlyhope

Check out this video . Maybe not the best way, but
it's quick and easy.:




posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 06:17 AM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

I agree.


It's always a good idea to have some documentation of how various projects were undertaken and completed. I call it "as-built" rather than "as-con" but that's probably a cultural thing.

Most of the time I just wind up with hundreds of digital images, dozens of receipts, pages of todo lists, and a handful of nearly illegible sketches on small pieces of paper.

But that's better than nothing!


-dex



posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: deadlyhope
You should consider putting the Ethernet cable in conduit, as every direct burial of electrical cable, low voltage etc will eventually fail.



posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 12:28 PM
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No conduit needed, just get the heavy stuff rated for in ground.

I've watched and helped them a few times on a few of my houses.

They bury it about 3 inches under the surface.

They use a tool that looks like a flat, heavy, square spade that is about 10 inches wide, stick it in the ground and rock it side to side (foward and away)to open a small "valley" and work it sideways until they complete the run for shorter runs. 100' or less.
A flat, square spade would prob work just as well.




posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 07:05 PM
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Direct burial cable should be below the frost line in order to keep it free from the effects of expansion and contraction of the soil during freeze thaw cycles. Just put it in some conduit if you want to keep it near the surface.
a reply to: deadlyhope




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