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Spinning Sphere of Molten sodium. Magnetic shield ?

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posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 08:59 AM
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Now this is interesting indeed. You tube presentation with some maverick science great stuff. Our magnetic shield has flipped many times in the past.
It has reduced by 10% in the last 100 years so our solar wind protection is reducing . There is also a known weak spot over South america Brazil I think ?
Worth a watch..


Published on Jul 14, 2018 An experiment on how turbulent convection in Earth's core makes a magnetic field Get a free audiobook with a free 30 day trial at www.audible.com... or text Veritasium to 500-500 Huge thanks to Prof. Dan Lathrop and team: ve42.co... Companion video to explain Earth's magnetic fields in more detail: youtu.be...



I learned a lot in making this video and the one on my second channel with Prof. Jon Arnou. I changed a lot of my preconceptions, specifically I thought: 1. That the Earth's magnetic field was a passive thing - it shouldn't need a continuous input of energy to maintain itself (that seemed reasonable to me because the magnetic field has been around for a long time and it seems mostly stable). But as it turns out, the Earth is a giant electromagnet, and so of course those currents dissipate their energy as they encounter resistance in the liquid metal through which they flow. So the energy to continuously create these currents comes from the kinetic energy of the liquid metal flows in the Earth's outer core. 2. If it's convection, I'm thinking hot things rising, cooler things falling. But apparently the main effect driving convection is the compositional differences at the boundary with the Earth's inner core. This is because of the differential freezing at the boundary. Things like iron freeze into the inner core, while elements like sulfur do not. Hence the pockets of lighter material which then rise outwards. 3. I didn't get why the fluid motion was necessary for the generation of the magnetic field. I mean if it's a conducting liquid, it can conduct currents whether it moves or not. But the key is that the liquid metal can 'trap' magnetic fields. I imagine this like how iron channels magnetic fields. Then once these fields are channeled, they can be pulled and stretched, making more magnetic field. 4. Fluids operate very differently in rotating frames of reference. This is something I didn't intuitively grasp. But, as fluids move from the inner core outwards, those particles are moving much more slowly in the direction of rotation than the matter that has been there for a long time, which means the convection currents get deflected and form helices.



edit on 14 7 2018 by skywatcher44 because: .




posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 11:18 AM
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Excellent scientific research!!!....



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 02:09 PM
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Maybe Cern has something to do with it, it's magnetic field is 100,000 times that of earths magnetic field...



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: xBWOMPx

Maybe Cern has something to do with it

Do with what? The Earth's magnetic field strength has been declining for more decades than the LHC has been active. And yet, it is still much stronger than it has been for the past 50,000 years.




"There has been speculation that we are about to experience a magnetic polar reversal or excursion," says Richard Holme, co-author of the study. "However, by studying the two most recent excursion events, we show that neither bear resemblance to current changes in the geomagnetic field and therefore it is probably unlikely that such an event is about to happen. Our research suggests instead that the current weakened field will recover without such an extreme event, and therefore is unlikely to reverse."

newatlas.com...



Btw, that magnet on your refrigerator door? It's 100 times stronger than the Earth's magnetic field. The Earth's field is pretty weak, but it is big.



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I did not know this, thank you for the input...

QUICK, EVERYBODY, DESTROY YOUR REFRIGERATOR MAGNETS!!!
edit on 14-7-2018 by xBWOMPx because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 04:01 PM
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a reply to: skywatcher44


There is also a known weak spot over South america Brazil I think ?


Is that the South Atlantic Anomaly? Or is it something else.



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 05:48 PM
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originally posted by: xBWOMPx
a reply to: Phage

I did not know this, thank you for the input...

QUICK, EVERYBODY, DESTROY YOUR REFRIGERATOR MAGNETS!!!


You ever consider that 2 earth based magnets of strong enough power can tear flesh from your body if they catch it? But the earth somehow keeps everything on it, yet we can jump up and down.

The weak force. Strong enough to hold everything together, delicately.



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: SummerRain


You ever consider that 2 earth based magnets of strong enough power can tear flesh from your body if they catch it?
What? It's been a while since I had an MRI but my flesh stayed on my bones, as I recall.



The weak force. Strong enough to hold everything together, delicately.

Gravity? The weakest force, actually. But pervasive, and it seems to suffice.

edit on 7/14/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 05:57 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: SummerRain


You ever consider that 2 earth based magnets of strong enough power can tear flesh from your body if they catch it?
What? It's been a while since I had an MRI but my flesh stayed on my bones, as I recall.



The weak force. Strong enough to hold everything together, delicately.

Gravity? The weakest force, actually. But pervasive, and it seems to suffice.


He never said MRI's were strong enough to rip your flesh away from you and he didn't mean gravity was a weak force



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: xBWOMPx



He never said MRI's were strong enough to rip your flesh away

He said "Earth based magnets." What do you think he was talking about?
An MRI involves very powerful magnets (2 Tesla, more than 100,000x the Earth's field) and when I had mine it was on Earth.



he didn't mean gravity was a weak force
Did you see the question mark in my post?

edit on 7/14/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 06:09 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: xBWOMPx



He never said MRI's were strong enough to rip your flesh away

He said "Earth based magnets." What do you think he was talking about?
An MRI involves very powerful magnets (2 Tesla, more than 100,000x the Earth's field) and when I had mine it was on Earth.



he didn't mean gravity was a weak force
Did you see the question mark in my post?


"IF it can catch it"



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: xBWOMPx

I was well and thoroughly caught in the MRI machine. My flesh remained attached.

Why not let the poster defend himself, if he desires?



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Why is it that the iron in our blood is not (or seems not) to be influenced by the incredible magnetic field created by an MRI machine? Is that type of iron just non-magnetic?



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: charlyv
Yeah.
There are ferromagnetic iron compounds and non-ferromagnetic iron compounds.



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 06:40 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: xBWOMPx

I was well and thoroughly caught in the MRI machine. My flesh remained attached.

Why not let the poster defend himself, if he desires?


shakes head, nevermind...



posted on Jul, 14 2018 @ 10:16 PM
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Companion Video.




spinlab.ess.ucla.edu...



posted on Jul, 15 2018 @ 04:11 PM
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originally posted by: xBWOMPx
Maybe Cern has something to do with it, it's magnetic field is 100,000 times that of earths magnetic field...


Cern is likely having bad effects on the planet.

And what really are the goals of those technologies...do they really have any clue as to its negative impacts?
edit on 15-7-2018 by ParasuvO because: (no reason given)



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