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Scientists Prove That Light Can Stop Electrons

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posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 08:52 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook
I'm not sure if this discovery has anything to do with mass or not either. What would happen to everyday objects and people if the light the emanate could be stopped? What about aging? I don't know.......What says ATS?



Maybe they can use it to stack electrons and form super powerful batteries. It would take more energy than you could get out but, I'm sure they'd like to have super batteries for robots or drones.




posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 09:27 PM
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originally posted by: AdKiller
Layman's translation:

Scientists attempted raising the sample rate of electrons for some nefarious reason, and found a pre programmed speed limit.


Are you alluding to C? I think a better layman's translation is:

Scientists explored the interaction between photons and free electrons in a nefarious way, and discovered electrons in free space can be both sped up and slowed down, and will shed off velocity by emitting insano short-wavelength EM radiation in doing so.



posted on Feb, 12 2018 @ 09:39 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

Right, free electrons move through space, as does all matter, and leave a sort of wake when they accelerate, which is interesting because the portion of the wake in front of the electron as it plows through space propagates at c. But if the region of space through which it's accelerating is already really wavy, say by a super-luminous laser beam, the waves of its wake would constructively and deconstructively interfere with the waves from the laser, and I suspect the "beats", to integrate a music analogy, between the two frequencies interacting, are in the gamma band. The energy of those beats would be a sort of fraction of the sum between the energy of the laser and the energy of the electron's velocity decelerating, integrated over time. So the photons the electron emits as it decelerates are amplified by the energy from the laser beam. I think. It's an interesting new way to modulate the frequency of high-energy photons.
edit on 12-2-2018 by Zelun because: really need to proofread more.



posted on Feb, 13 2018 @ 05:56 PM
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a reply to: Zelun

Now what you said there actually totally makes sense in a way that actually makes a whole bunch of things way more clear for me than they've ever been before wrt photons!

Thank you



posted on Feb, 13 2018 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

The beginning of faster than light travel... or a quicker way to cook chicken nuggets.



posted on Feb, 14 2018 @ 11:02 AM
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OMG!!!!
they WILL weaponize this.
you hit it with 100 beams
and you have a LOT of power energy!

watch this disappear!

edit on 14-2-2018 by buddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2018 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: buddha
OMG!!!!
they WILL weaponize this.
you hit it with 100 beams
and you have a LOT of power energy!

watch this disappear!


Try a little harder at making sense please.

Laser cooling is nothing new and is done time and time again. This particular theoretical prediction of a stopping effect has been around for a long time.

Also... weaponize what exactly? a laser? too late

Hit what with 100 beams?

a lot of power energy... which is it? power or energy? As I said, try a lot harder before trying to contribute please, rather than doing a standard issue "OMG WEAPONIZE... BLAH BLAH" Sometimes its worse in here than that crazy guy on the bus who tells you he has an IQ of 148 and yet his solution to world problems is nuclear genocide... yeah... really smart



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

"completely" (as in 100%) was the wrong word, I give you that.



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: intrptr

"completely" (as in 100%) was the wrong word, I give you that.



And yet they still don't '100% agree' if photons have mass or not?



posted on Feb, 15 2018 @ 11:27 AM
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originally posted by: lostbook
a reply to: lostbook

This may be in the same vein as my aging question but I also wonder if by stopping electrons, one could stop time...?


No, 'time' does not change in total darkness. But I don't watch the clock on the wall very much anyway, so...







 
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