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The Sunjammer Project

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posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 08:14 PM
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The obvious real problem the position of my detractor is has not provided a shred of evidence that his or her position is actually relevant. in consideration that the Max Plank Institute, is making it, obvious that such a position makes no sense.

Unless of course, the Max Planks Institute wishes to offer a detraction due to correspondence with my detractor, her she wishes to offer evedence to that effect.

Otherwise what Phage said is contemplatively BS.
edit on 25-11-2017 by Kashai because: Added content




posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 09:05 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
The obvious real problem the position of my detractor is has not provided a shred of evidence that his or her position is actually relevant. in consideration that the Max Plank Institute, is making it, obvious that such a position makes no sense.

Unless of course, the Max Planks Institute wishes to offer a detraction due to correspondence with my detractor, her she wishes to offer evedence to that effect.

Otherwise what Phage said is contemplatively BS.


Thanks for the link. Still thinking.............



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 09:16 PM
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Your source:

He also calculated that a sail measuring about 320 km (200 miles) in diameter could reach Proxima Centauri in just over 12 years. Meanwhile, a sail measuring about 965 km (600 miles) in diameter would arrive in just under 9 years.
www.universetoday.com...
That works great if you're not going to slow down or have a real powerful way to do so.



Your other source, three scientists, one of whom works at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research.

The total duration of interstellar travel would be 75 years from the solar system to α Cen A and B and another 46 years on to Proxima b, adding up to 121 years.
www.hou.usra.edu...


I said that slowing down is a problem. I said that slowing down takes a long time. That's true even for a probe massing a few grams (much easier to accelerate), which is what your source is talking about.

A space probe with a weight of only a few grams (communication, navigation, propulsion, science instruments) attached to an ultra-light, highly refective foil could permit interstellar cruising speeds of several percent of the speed of light (c). The kinetic energy could be gained from a ground-based laser array shooting at the lightsail in a near Earth orbit or from the solar photon pressure [3].




edit on 11/25/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Gee whiz Batman since when was speeding up easier than slowing down?
edit on 25-11-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 10:17 PM
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You gotta admit that is funny.



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 10:21 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

since when was speeding up easier than slowing down?

It isn't. Acceleration includes both. Acceleration is a change in velocity. A given acceleration requires a given amount of energy.




You gotta admit that is funny
I don't usually find ignorance funny. For you, I'll make an exception.

edit on 11/25/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 10:43 PM
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a reply to: Phage



Acceleration, in physics, is the rate of change of velocity of an object with respect to time. An object's acceleration is the net result of any and all forces acting on the object, as described by Newton's Second Law.[1] The SI unit of acceleration is meter per second squared (m s−2). Accelerations are vector quantities (they have magnitude and direction) and add according to the parallelogram law.[2][3] As a vector, the calculated net force is equal to the product of the object's mass (a scalar quantity) and its acceleration.




deceleration (countable and uncountable, plural decelerations)
(uncountable) The act or process of decelerating.
The rocket is now in deceleration.
(countable) The amount by which a speed or velocity decreases (and so a scalar quantity or a vector quantity).
The brakes produce a deceleration of 10 meters per second per second.tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acceleration


en.wiktionary.org...

So you saying I am ignorant because I do not understand that acceleration and deceleration are the same things?

Behaving ignorant in forum potentially involves saying something like "there was this lady from Virgina...." accelerating is consistently less difficult than decelerating.

The fact of the matter is, that it is possible to decelerate to a stop with a solar sail and there are practical conclusions to that effect.










edit on 25-11-2017 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 10:46 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

So you saying I am ignorant because I do not understand that acceleration and deceleration are the same things?
Ignorant of the physics involved which is the context in which I used the word, yes, that is what I said. Your source:

Acceleration, in physics, is the rate of change of velocity of an object with respect to time.




accelerating is consistently less difficult than decelerating.
It takes the same amount of energy to increase the velocity of a mass that it does to decrease its velocity the same amount.



The fact of the matter is, that it is possible to decelerate to a stop with a solar sail and there are practical conclusions to that effect.
Can you point out where I said otherwise?


edit on 11/25/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 11:32 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Semantic BS.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:53 PM
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Here is the first successful effort to apply solar sails.



IKAROS (Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun) is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) experimental spacecraft. The spacecraft was launched on 21 May 2010, aboard an H-IIA rocket, together with the Akatsuki (Venus Climate Orbiter) probe and four other small spacecraft. IKAROS is the first spacecraft to successfully demonstrate solar sail technology in interplanetary space.

On 8 December 2010, IKAROS passed by Venus at about 80,800 km (50,200 mi) distance, completing the planned mission successfully, and entered its extended operation phase.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 03:54 PM
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The origin of the term. I read this story when I was a boy, in the magazine.
bookzone.boyslife.org...
edit on 11/26/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Never read that before.


Myself my childhood was complicated but it was fun.

From what I have read Sunjammer ran into logistical problems although MASA has other missions scheduled as far forward, as 2035.

I remember an episode of Twilight Zone wherein during the intro Rod Sterling presents what was then a modern day Radar Detector designed to catch people speeding in cars.

The thing was about the size of a modern Washer.

Say's something about the payload of our first satellite, to Proxima, at least officially.














edit on 26-11-2017 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Nov, 29 2017 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: Phage

would the solar winds not automatically start slowing you down once you started approaching new system. i mean at what point dos new systems solar winds start outpacing propulsive power from ours.



posted on Nov, 29 2017 @ 11:59 PM
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a reply to: proteus33

Solar wind sail is different from a light sail. A solar wind sail would only provide acceleration within the heliosphere.

The light sail is a different concept, relying upon the "pressure" of electromagnetic radiation. Specifically, in the case presented herein, the pressure of a high powered laser. This provides thrust as long as the intensity behind is greater than intensity from other vectors. That primary thrust decreases according to the inverse square rule. That applies to decreasing velocity as well, the farther you are from the source, the less acceleration (so as to not confuse the OP, "deceleration") is provided. A laser powered light sail can get a vehicle moving very fast, over a shorter time span, because the light is concentrated on the sail. Starlight (not so concentrated) will take a long time to slow it down so the transition has to be done earlier in the voyage. Net result, the laser boost doesn't really help much, it still takes a long time to get there.


edit on 11/30/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 10:36 PM
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ok uses a laser got you. ok if you are using a sale hundreds of kilometers in diameter would the sail not weigh many many tons? would the laser not have to be powerful in the extreme maybe higher than petawatt lasers . if so would you be able to make a nuclear of fusion power source small enough to make it feasible?



posted on Dec, 1 2017 @ 05:04 AM
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a reply to: proteus33


In three years, a solar sail could reach speeds of 150,000 mph (240,000 kph), scientists estimate. At that speed, it could reach Pluto in less than five years.



www.space.com...




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