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Ancient Anunnaki Water Bucket and another find. Thoughts?

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posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: Sapphire

originally posted by: Fools
What is with the purse in one hand and the pine cone (or whatever) in so many ancient images?


www.ancient-origins.net...


Could the mysterious handbag really represent the cosmos? Assyrian relief carving from Nimrud, 883–859 B.C. ( Metropolitan Museum of Art )


There is more information here. As for the pinecone, i believe it represents the pineal gland/3rd eye esoteric knowlege.


The numerous representations seem more like some actually working tools.




posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

Thanks Byrd
I learn something new every day.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 03:45 PM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy

originally posted by: Sapphire

originally posted by: Fools
What is with the purse in one hand and the pine cone (or whatever) in so many ancient images?


www.ancient-origins.net...


Could the mysterious handbag really represent the cosmos? Assyrian relief carving from Nimrud, 883–859 B.C. ( Metropolitan Museum of Art )


There is more information here. As for the pinecone, i believe it represents the pineal gland/3rd eye esoteric knowlege.


The numerous representations seem more like some actually working tools.


In reference to the items held or in general via the carvings? If so yes, some may have been.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: Harte
The pic in the OP of the two genies anointing the tree is a good example of this.
That piece isn't even Sumerian - it's Assyrian.
The heavily muscled calves give it away every time.

Nor are the two figures "Anunnakis." They are both Assyrian versions of what the Sumerians called Abgal and the Babylonians called Apkallu.
The Abgal in Sumer were seven agents of Anu sent to help humans by giving them science, agriculture, writing, etc. It's a myth repeated in other religions, including the Greek.
In Babylonia, the first Apkallu was a human being - he was a fisherman by the name of Adapa.

In any case, these mythical creatures were NOT gods at all.

Some scholars put them as the origin of both the Djinn myths and the Angel myths of the Levant.

Harte


I really should take some Assyriology courses. It's posts like yours that make me realize just how woefully ignorant I am. Hopefully I can find something on Coursera or similar. I love studying these kinds of things.


LOL!
I meant the post for other readers, assuming you knew all that already. In fact, I was just rereading it and cringed because it looked like I was trying to school Byrd!

Always check the calves.

Harte



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: Byrd

Most people Ive shown the image to, see honey bees next to two pillars.

Ive also recently read that they are experimenting with creating electric with salt water ponds in Isreal. The ponds in this area are salt ponds. It seems to me that if the lines that make up the honey bee images were made with raw ore, rich in silver or copper or even gold, then yes there is a possibility of electrical generation. At least that is what I have been told by people who experiment with generating electric.

It's called a galvanic cell and results in one of the two metals being corroded.
Every time.

Harte


I don't think gold is very good for this, though... as I recall there are many other things that are far better. Nobody with an advanced battery technology would use gold because it performs poorly. No one with a simple battery technology would use it because it's somewhat scarce.

Any pair of dissimilar metal will work so it would be stupid to use gold anyway.
But gold would produce galvanic corrosion when paired with certain other metals. Check the blog about galvanic corrosionhere.

This site has the electrochemical series, a listing of metals in order of electron potential. Any two in the series will react galvanically, but the pairs of metals that are far apart in the series will react more than the pairs that are close to each other in the series.

NOW I'm schoolin'.

Harte



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 05:37 PM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy

originally posted by: Sapphire

originally posted by: Fools
What is with the purse in one hand and the pine cone (or whatever) in so many ancient images?


www.ancient-origins.net...


Could the mysterious handbag really represent the cosmos? Assyrian relief carving from Nimrud, 883–859 B.C. ( Metropolitan Museum of Art )


There is more information here. As for the pinecone, i believe it represents the pineal gland/3rd eye esoteric knowlege.


The numerous representations seem more like some actually working tools.

The Akkadian words for the bucket and the cone are "banddudû" (bucket) and "mullilu" (purifier,) thus the proposition that you are looking at some sort of purification ritual.
It should be obvious (at least in this case) that scholars don't just make stuff up. There's a reason the refer to this as ritualistic.

Unless, of course, one proposes these apkallu are merely purifying their buckets.

Harte



posted on Aug, 8 2017 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

LOL!
I meant the post for other readers, assuming you knew all that already. In fact, I was just rereading it and cringed because it looked like I was trying to school Byrd!

Always check the calves.

Harte


ROFL! I didn't take it that way. I was delighted and fascinated to learn something new.



posted on Aug, 8 2017 @ 07:35 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

That's one of the Waterholes off Lake Co Rd. 2-06 near Paisley, Oregon. Not sure which one, many have similar layouts



posted on Aug, 8 2017 @ 10:10 PM
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originally posted by: Wreckclues
a reply to: Byrd

That's one of the Waterholes off Lake Co Rd. 2-06 near Paisley, Oregon. Not sure which one, many have similar layouts



I believe I've found it (42.619102, -120.508351)

It's dry now. No bees or Han Solo there.



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 06:14 AM
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originally posted by: Byrd
I believe you're correct... though the figures look more European than Persian/Turkish.

I have done a comparison to further elaborate my point:

The carvings are from Persepolis in what we speculate are Immortals; the bucket design seems to be emulating the general icon. You can also notice the traditional Mesopotamian standing goat to the right, as well as the 12 rim segments which I have mentioned previous possibly relating to the Persian zodiac.

So I do believe this is a Persian design, however it is not something I recognize and may likely be modern.



posted on Aug, 17 2017 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: SargonThrall

originally posted by: Byrd
I believe you're correct... though the figures look more European than Persian/Turkish.

I have done a comparison to further elaborate my point:

The carvings are from Persepolis in what we speculate are Immortals; the bucket design seems to be emulating the general icon. You can also notice the traditional Mesopotamian standing goat to the right, as well as the 12 rim segments which I have mentioned previous possibly relating to the Persian zodiac.

So I do believe this is a Persian design, however it is not something I recognize and may likely be modern.


Persian's also likely.

Do look again at the picture you posted... the minarets are not a feature of any ancient art and the "robe" worn by the central figure ends about the knee level. He is wearing striped trousers (you can clearly see a vertical striped pattern) - trousers are more of a modern garment. Although they were worn in China from around 1700 BC (at least that's the earliest recorded ones) they don't appear in the Mediterranean areas (Sumeria, etc) until around the time of Julius Caesar and don't really become popular until the Middle Ages.







 
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