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Ancient Anunnaki Water Bucket and another find. Thoughts?

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posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 11:52 PM
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originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: Byrd
It seems to me that if the lines that make up the honey bee images were made with raw ore, rich in silver or copper or even gold, then yes there is a possibility of electrical generation.

Those metals are conductors, not magical electricity generators.

At least that is what I have been told by people who experiment with generating electric.

Those people are either lying or ignorant or both.




posted on Aug, 5 2017 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: misskat1

2 dissimilar conductors immersed in an electrolyte forms a basic battery. The 2 electrodes must be separated from each other or what you have is a short circuit so different metals in the container wall is not going to work. The intrinsic open circuit voltage is a function of the metals used as electrodes EG zinc + carbon gives around 1.5V per cell, lithium cells are 3.7V, lead-acid 2V etc etc.

That container could produce a voltage if a (eg zinc, iron, carbon etc) rod was suspended inside it and it was filled with lemon juice, salt water, vinegar or basically any electrolyte. The same could said of any metal container.

Stick 2 different metals in a lemon and you have a battery for example.
edit on 5/8/2017 by Pilgrum because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 12:56 AM
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Was the image saved from here?:
www.artifactcollectors.com... (Was posted 3 years ago there. Same exact pic.)

Also, there's another similar one here:
www.artifactcollectors.com...

Although... that one looks like an old pot, but with Sumerian art RECENTLY engraved on it, lol.
edit on 6-8-2017 by Kromlech because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 01:52 AM
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a reply to: misskat1
The imagery appears to be Persian, while the style is clearly so. Compare with this 1500s Persian bucket, noting the broader base:

It also has a rim separated into 12 segments, a common motif representing either the Persian zodiac or, during the Islamic period, the 12 caliphs.

Byrd may well be correct in that it could be modern. At any rate it is certainly not of the "Anunnaki".



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: misskat1

This is intriguing! There are also many myths that stem from Sumerian culture.
edit on 6-8-2017 by Sapphire because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 02:18 AM
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originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: Byrd

You clicked onto my own blog. Thank you for the information. I will compare it to other images and see if I can pin point the era. It would answer a lot of questions if it was authentic.


There is no "era" for "Annunaki" as people/culture. They were a group of lesser deities during some periods. "Alternative" culture has popularized the idea that they were real aliens, etc but there's actually no trace of such a culture and no evidence of super-advanced technology. This problem is compounded by people who haven't studied Assyriology identifying all sorts of things as "Annunaki (including various spirits, kings, and other things not related to them.)

And then there's the hoaxers and "pious fraudsters" with all sorts of fakes out there.

This is a relatively modern piece. It may have originally been Russian or Ukranian. Look very closely at all the details on all the figures. Mesopotamians wear kilts (not trousers) and when they are depicted there's a great deal of attention to their musculature. They used a set number of poses. They did not use "onion domes" as symbols for anything. Their artifacts do not have fluted edges.

I'd also say that the gold looks a bit faked (the wrong color) but that's probably just my computer.

This thing really is modern-ish and is more likely to represent a king and a legend/fairy tale.

Here is what a reputable auction looks like
* it's clearly identified where the thing came from
* what it is
* what the material is
* the dates (approximate)
* where it's been written about (literature)
* a really GOOD catalog will have a bit about the subject or other things of note (as this has.)

Artifacts can be extremely valuable - but without the information above they are worth very little. At some time the new owner might want to donate it to a museum or something else and the documentation makes the object a very fat tax deduction. If they or their heirs want to sell the object, this documentation is the difference between a few hundred dollars and tens of thousands of dollars.

If an auction doesn't have that, the authenticity is doubtful at best and the objects are not very valuable (there are exceptions but it's expensive to get something correctly authenticated.)



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 02:21 AM
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originally posted by: SargonThrall
a reply to: misskat1
The imagery appears to be Persian, while the style is clearly so. Compare with this 1500s Persian bucket, noting the broader base:



I believe you're correct... though the figures look more European than Persian/Turkish. However, they did a lot of things for the tourist trade so it could be a piece designed to appeal to Russian tourists.
edit on 6-8-2017 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 07:44 AM
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a reply to: misskat1

There were no anunnaki or ancient aliens in Sumer. All "evidence" you might find is only depicting their(Sumerians) mystical believes. In other terms, their occult knowledge.Your last photo is purely religious diagram, it represents creation itself. You might want to research "Web of wyrd" and "Kabballah tree of life" for reference.

Sincerely,
-Argent




posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 09:20 AM
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a reply to: Argentbenign

The term Anunnaki was used by the auction house. I just wanted others opinion of what it is and what it was used for.

Also, Im just looking for the truth, and the pond with the bees, and the image I posted under it, has very similar symbolism.
The bees have a more Hebrew look to them. The one on the left looks male the one on the right looks female. They are too symmetrical for it to be natural. The top image and bottom image also mirror each other. They look like Bee hives.

There may not be any connection at all, with the many carvings we have that depict two winged beings. But, I think its worth sharing so others can enjoy the beauty of it.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: Argentbenign
Also, Im just looking for the truth, and the pond with the bees, and the image I posted under it, has very similar symbolism.


If the pond was NOT designed by someone/something then it can't symbolize anything. It can have a personal meaning to someone but it's not a symbol (The "old man of the mountains" was a natural formation that "looked like" a human face from a certain angle until parts of it fell off - that's "paridolia." Mount Rushmore, which was designed and clearly represents four presidents, is a symbol.)

Are you saying that someone designed the pond? Did you look at it in other years? Pond shapes change as water arrives or evaporates.

...and it still looks like Han Solo in carbonite. I don't see the bees. Sorry.


The bees have a more Hebrew look to them. The one on the left looks male the one on the right looks female. They are too symmetrical for it to be natural. The top image and bottom image also mirror each other. They look like Bee hives.


Uhm... how do YOU identify male and female bees? I'm just curious there because nothing about Han looks particularly male and female. Google shows images of queen bees, worker bees, and drone bees. There's only a few drones in each hive and they're all fatter and rounder than any of the females (and larger than worker bees but smaller than the queen.)



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 12:05 PM
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originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: Argentbenign

The term Anunnaki was used by the auction house. I just wanted others opinion of what it is and what it was used for.


It's probably a listing written by the person who owned it, then. No real auction house would present an antiquity this way.

If someone's listing an object on Ebay or a similar site, they do not have to tell the truth about what it is. In fact, there's a lot of liars out there - a good story helps sell something. Here's a "haunted necklace" - which turns a $1.50 necklace into a $20 (plus shipping) necklace. It will rid you of the evil influences of $20.

And here's one for a "golden god djinn" ... I think I'll just quote a section of this:


A Golden God Djinn is an original of his kind, rumored to have been created from the spiritual alchemy of the Annunaki Gods prior to the arrival on mankind upon the earth.

Also believed to be co-existent with the Ancient Annunaki rulers and made immortal by the powers of the "golden elixir", just as the breed of "original" Golden Blood Vampires were during approximately the same period.

A Golden God Djinn has a superabundance of powers whose abilities are far broader and which manifest more powerfully than other Djinn.


...etc. The person who did this is clearly very sincere but I doubt that they went to Tibet to collect the teeth themselves (they could actually be dog teeth) and I don't think they ever read anything on Sumeria beyond the books by Sitchin.

So anyone can make up any goofy thing about an object. Professional houses stake their reputation on proving what the object is. Everyone else can tell you that an object is a wolf tooth from Tibet and has been imbued with mystical Annunaki powers ... and people will actually spend money on this.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: Byrd

Most people Ive shown the image to, see honey bees next to two pillars.

Ive also recently read that they are experimenting with creating electric with salt water ponds in Isreal. The ponds in this area are salt ponds. It seems to me that if the lines that make up the honey bee images were made with raw ore, rich in silver or copper or even gold, then yes there is a possibility of electrical generation. At least that is what I have been told by people who experiment with generating electric.

It's called a galvanic cell and results in one of the two metals being corroded.
Every time.

Harte



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 06:52 PM
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originally posted by: Willtell
Interestingly, these ancient Gods or whatever, as the picture in the op shows, use to carry little hand bags around. Even the real ancient recent find in Turkey at Göbekli Tepe had examples of these big giant men with huge forearms carrying these weird looking little hand bags. Check out the link below.

lost-origins.com...

Clicking on your link, I note no "big giant men" on the stones shown.
However, and I believe everyone here has seen it, there is what looks like a "handbag" motif along the tops of some of the upright stones.

It's been written about several times in books designed to part a fool from his money.

Harte



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 07:08 PM
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originally posted by: Byrd


There is no "era" for "Annunaki" as people/culture. They were a group of lesser deities during some periods. "Alternative" culture has popularized the idea that they were real aliens, etc but there's actually no trace of such a culture and no evidence of super-advanced technology. This problem is compounded by people who haven't studied Assyriology identifying all sorts of things as "Annunaki (including various spirits, kings, and other things not related to them.)


The pic in the OP of the two genies anointing the tree is a good example of this.
That piece isn't even Sumerian - it's Assyrian.
The heavily muscled calves give it away every time.

Nor are the two figures "Anunnakis." They are both Assyrian versions of what the Sumerians called Abgal and the Babylonians called Apkallu.
The Abgal in Sumer were seven agents of Anu sent to help humans by giving them science, agriculture, writing, etc. It's a myth repeated in other religions, including the Greek.
In Babylonia, the first Apkallu was a human being - he was a fisherman by the name of Adapa.

In any case, these mythical creatures were NOT gods at all.

Some scholars put them as the origin of both the Djinn myths and the Angel myths of the Levant.

Harte



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 07:21 PM
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originally posted by: Harte
The pic in the OP of the two genies anointing the tree is a good example of this.
That piece isn't even Sumerian - it's Assyrian.
The heavily muscled calves give it away every time.

Nor are the two figures "Anunnakis." They are both Assyrian versions of what the Sumerians called Abgal and the Babylonians called Apkallu.
The Abgal in Sumer were seven agents of Anu sent to help humans by giving them science, agriculture, writing, etc. It's a myth repeated in other religions, including the Greek.
In Babylonia, the first Apkallu was a human being - he was a fisherman by the name of Adapa.

In any case, these mythical creatures were NOT gods at all.

Some scholars put them as the origin of both the Djinn myths and the Angel myths of the Levant.

Harte


I really should take some Assyriology courses. It's posts like yours that make me realize just how woefully ignorant I am. Hopefully I can find something on Coursera or similar. I love studying these kinds of things.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: Byrd

Most people Ive shown the image to, see honey bees next to two pillars.

Ive also recently read that they are experimenting with creating electric with salt water ponds in Isreal. The ponds in this area are salt ponds. It seems to me that if the lines that make up the honey bee images were made with raw ore, rich in silver or copper or even gold, then yes there is a possibility of electrical generation. At least that is what I have been told by people who experiment with generating electric.

It's called a galvanic cell and results in one of the two metals being corroded.
Every time.

Harte


I don't think gold is very good for this, though... as I recall there are many other things that are far better. Nobody with an advanced battery technology would use gold because it performs poorly. No one with a simple battery technology would use it because it's somewhat scarce.



posted on Aug, 6 2017 @ 08:11 PM
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a reply to: misskat1

Interesting share.
Is there a scale reference?
Those cone shapes objects seem to coincide with those bags or boxes seen at times I wonder if they were carried inside them...



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 11:30 AM
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What is with the purse in one hand and the pine cone (or whatever) in so many ancient images?



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: Fools
What is with the purse in one hand and the pine cone (or whatever) in so many ancient images?


www.ancient-origins.net...


Could the mysterious handbag really represent the cosmos? Assyrian relief carving from Nimrud, 883–859 B.C. ( Metropolitan Museum of Art )


There is more information here. As for the pinecone, i believe it represents the pineal gland/3rd eye esoteric knowlege.



posted on Aug, 7 2017 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: Sapphire

originally posted by: Fools
What is with the purse in one hand and the pine cone (or whatever) in so many ancient images?


www.ancient-origins.net...


Could the mysterious handbag really represent the cosmos? Assyrian relief carving from Nimrud, 883–859 B.C. ( Metropolitan Museum of Art )


There is more information here. As for the pinecone, i believe it represents the pineal gland/3rd eye esoteric knowlege.


The dictionaries on symbolism say that the bucket held either water or pollen (according to written sources) and that it was used in purification rituals (and held by spirits.) They didn't know much about brains or brain anatomy and the pineal gland is rather hard to see. There aren't any texts showing that they knew about it or about other parts of the brain.

A very good book on this with lots of references .

(edited to add... the association of "the third eye" with the pineal gland actually was made by Madame Blavatsky in the late 1800's. The Tibetans never actually associated it with the third eye.

edit on 7-8-2017 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



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