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C-130 down in Mississippi

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posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 12:57 AM
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a reply to: starviego

They always travel in civilian clothes. That's the only account that claims to have seen someone jump. There's no way they could have though. The chute was found empty at a fish pond near the crash site.




posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 04:06 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: starviego

They always travel in civilian clothes. That's the only account that claims to have seen someone jump. There's no way they could have though. The chute was found empty at a fish pond near the crash site.


Was there a D.B. Cooper on the passenger list ?



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 01:26 PM
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Maj. Caine M. Goyette; Cap. Sean E. Elliot of Orage, Calif.; Gunnery Sgt. Mark A. Hopkins of Chesapeake, Va.; Gunnery Sgt. Brendan C. Johnson of Chittenden, Va.; Staff Sgt. Joshua M. Snowden of Dallas Texas; Sgt. Julian M Kevianne of Dallas, Texas; Sgt. Owen J. Lennon of Rockland, N.Y.; Cpl. Daniel I. Baldassare of Monmouth, N.J.; Cpl. Collin J. Schaaff of Pierce, Wash.; Staff Sgt. Robert H. Cox of Ventura, Calif.; Staff Sgt. William J. Kundrat of Frederick, Md.; Sgt. Chad E. Jenson of Los Angeles, Calif.; Sgt. Talon R. Leach of Callaway, Mo.; Sgt. Joseph J. Murray of Duval, Fla.; Sgt. Dietrich A. Schmieman of Benton, Wash.; and PO2 Ryan M. Lohrey of Middletown, Ind.

www.foxnews.com...



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

This hits much closer to home than I thought it possibly could. Maj Goyette's wife works with my wife. Heartbroken for the families involved. It certainly wasn't the most comfortable ride, but I always felt 100% safe in a C 130. Their service record stands for itself. I'm really a terrible a loss for words.




ETA local article on the crash and Major Goyette
edit on 14-7-2017 by peter vlar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

Damn. I'm sorry to hear that. If you have the opportunity tell her how sorry I am for her loss.

The Herc is a damn good bird and has a great record overall. This was a horrible accident and I hope to hell it's a one time thing.



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Just now catching up on this and RIP to all these fine men (looked like all men from the list of names). So sad to hear...



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'll pass the message along, thank you and I know she will appreciate the kind words. He's younger than I am and his kids are all pretty young as well. I probably shouldn't have looked at the photos of the crash site or read the article I linked in my edit. Brings back a lot of memories, mostly good ones to be sure but inevitably as anyone who has served knows, it's hard not to start thinking of people we served with who are no longer with us and the photos brought back a lot of stuff I had buried long ago.



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

That's always the worst part. I only had to deal with one bird going down, thank god. We lost 7 men that day. I was young and visiting friends, and the family network kicked into high gear about ten minutes before it hit the news.

Everyone went home and gathered around the television to wait with bated breath to see if there were survivors and who it was. The squadron it belonged to shut down. The other helo and their Herc minder came back and I'm amazed the crews were able to fly, let alone land and get back to parking. The next two months you expected to see them come around the corner, and kept looking for the bird they were flying.

That one turned out to be maintenance error, which made it that much worse.

Funny story about a loss.... I was in 2nd grade, and on my way home from school, and watched one of my father's FB-111s slam into a river (crew punched and the capsule landed on a bridge). I got home and ran in the door yelling, "Mom! Mom! I saw an FB go down!" She told me not to lie, because I'd get in trouble. Not ten minutes later my father calls. One of the first things she says is, "Did you lose an airplane?" He said yes and asked how she knew, she hung up with him, came over and apologized for saying I lied.


edit on 7/14/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58

They always travel in civilian clothes.


Since when? When I was in, we were always in uniform while flying, even when traveling 'Space A."
edit on 14-7-2017 by starviego because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 03:24 PM
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a reply to: starviego

Raider units and SOCOM fall under different rules for travel, even in CONUS. They travel in civilian clothes, so they can walk off the plane, onto another one if necessary, or into a car and go right to work.

We always knew it was a SOCOM mission because even the flight crew was in civilian clothes. Usually nice suits, but I never saw them in uniform.

edit on 7/14/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 7/14/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
They travel in civilian clothes, so they can walk off the plane ... and go right to work.


If they 'work' in civilian clothes, then they are no longer covered by the Geneva Convention, and what they are doing is criminal, by any yardstick.
edit on 14-7-2017 by starviego because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 03:30 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: peter vlar

That's always the worst part. I only had to deal with one bird going down, thank god. We lost 7 men that day. I was young and visiting friends, and the family network kicked into high gear about ten minutes before it hit the news.

Everyone went home and gathered around the television to wait with bated breath to see if there were survivors and who it was. The squadron it belonged to shut down. The other helo and their Herc minder came back and I'm amazed the crews were able to fly, let alone land and get back to parking. The next two months you expected to see them come around the corner, and kept looking for the bird they were flying.

That one turned out to be maintenance error, which made it that much worse.

Funny story about a loss.... I was in 2nd grade, and on my way home from school, and watched one of my father's FB-111s slam into a river (crew punched and the capsule landed on a bridge). I got home and ran in the door yelling, "Mom! Mom! I saw an FB go down!" She told me not to lie, because I'd get in trouble. Not ten minutes later my father calls. One of the first things she says is, "Did you lose an airplane?" He said yes and asked how she knew, she hung up with him, came over and apologized for saying I lied.



I was unlucky enough myself to be playing in the park when United Airlines Flight 585 went down South of Colorado Springs. We were all playing basketball in the park that Sunday morning when we heard the engines and saw the plane hard on its side almost upside down. It smashed into the earth dam south of the lake about 500 yards across the park from where we were playing. I still remember it clear as day and even the feeling of the concussion when it hit the ground...Needless to say there were no survivors and it was a total mess. The smell and taste of the air still stick with me to this day.



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: starviego

Some of their work involves going undercover to get information and get out. Sometimes they're just playing guard for some DV, and they're going into an area that is less than friendly to the US. I never once saw a SOCOM crew come through in uniform.



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: GuidedKill

I'm glad I've never seen anything like that. I've been to a few crash sites, but all were military. One went through a duplex 45 minutes before school got out.



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 03:38 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: GuidedKill

I'm glad I've never seen anything like that. I've been to a few crash sites, but all were military. One went through a duplex 45 minutes before school got out.


It is not something I will ever forget that's for sure..



posted on Jul, 14 2017 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: GuidedKill

I can imagine. That whole rudder situation was a bad deal. They came damn close to losing two other 737s besides the ones that did go down.



posted on Jul, 15 2017 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: starviego

Only in a combat zone.



posted on Jul, 15 2017 @ 01:01 PM
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a reply to: GuidedKill

I know what you mean. I was working towards being an air crash investigator. I was asked to help out with US Air Flight 427. I was there for 10 days. I gave up on crash investigation and went to school for engineering.



posted on Jul, 17 2017 @ 10:56 AM
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In 2004, the aircraft involved was hit by a wind gust while parked, that tipped it onto one of the wings. Then in 2010, while parked at Fort Worth, so much snow landed on it that it tipped back onto its tail.



posted on Jul, 17 2017 @ 03:49 PM
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originally posted by: starviego

originally posted by: Zaphod58
They travel in civilian clothes, so they can walk off the plane ... and go right to work.


If they 'work' in civilian clothes, then they are no longer covered by the Geneva Convention, and what they are doing is criminal, by any yardstick.


Self-proclaimed 'exceptionalism' means we are above the law. If the Americans do it, it's not illegal.

Wasn't that part of the message from the Downing Street Memo?

No matter, it's a shame about the 130 last week. I'm betting some high explosive material was accidentally detonated.



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