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An extragalactic void is shoving our galaxy from behind

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posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 09:22 AM
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Will be an exciting time for humans in 4 billion years. Our sun will be getting old and our galaxy will merge with its soulmate Andromeda. Think of how many more stars we will be able to colonize!
Push baby Push




posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 09:33 AM
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That's a very cool dicovery, and proves the observation that empty space has an intrinsic tendency to expand, and to push matter as it does so. That's what they call "dark energy" which is responsible for expansion of the universe. All of the space is expanding, but those gigantic voids that are almost completely empty of matter are expanding extra hard.

Empty space expands due to quantum fluctuations of zero-point energy (the energy that is "always there", no matter how empty space is), which produces a "foam" of virtual particles constantly popping in and out of existence.

If this new finding is well-substantiated, then it's a remarkable one - for the first time we're observing an area of empty space pushing matter on the cosmic scale.

One thing I wonder about, is that if all this flow of galaxies to Shapely Attractor is stronger than the expansion of universe, will they all end up crashing into one big blob of matter that creates a super-galactic black hole?


edit on 31-1-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

The Casimir effect has nothing to do with things.


Because the strength of the force falls off rapidly with distance, it is measurable only when the distance between the objects is extremely small. On a submicron scale, this force becomes so strong that it becomes the dominant force between uncharged conductors.


Dark energy is another made up force to explain away yuge gaping holes in the current model. There is no proof for it.


Empty space expands due to quantum fluctuations of zero-point energy (the energy that is "always there", no matter how empty space is), which produces a "foam" of virtual particles constantly popping in and out of existence.


More theory.



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: AttentionGrabber

Most likely. Lol



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 09:48 AM
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Anyone can say "no, they are wrong", but let's see your math and observational proof that the current mainstream models and theories are wrong. The ball is in your court.
edit on 31-1-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 09:55 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Regarding "zero points" and the Casimir sweater effect,


The effects of vacuum energy can be experimentally observed in various phenomena such as spontaneous emission, the Casimir effect and the Lamb shift, and are thought to influence the behavior of the Universe on cosmological scales. Using the upper limit of the cosmological constant, the vacuum energy of free space has been estimated to be 10−9 joules (10−2 ergs) per cubic meter.[2] However, in both quantum electrodynamics (QED) and stochastic electrodynamics (SED), consistency with the principle of Lorentz covariance and with the magnitude of the Planck constant requires it to have a much larger value of 10113 joules per cubic meter.[3][4] This huge discrepancy is known as the vacuum catastrophe


en.wikipedia.org...


In cosmology, the cosmological constant problem is the disagreement between measured values of the vacuum energy density (the small value of the cosmological constant) and the zero-point energy suggested by quantum field theory.



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Could it be the exit of a black hole ?



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Regarding dark energy,


In physical cosmology and astronomy, dark energy is an unknown form of energy which is hypothesized to permeate all of space, tending to accelerate the expansion of the universe.[1] Dark energy is the most accepted hypothesis to explain the observations since the 1990s indicating that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate.


Nothing but speculation.


Assuming that the standard model of cosmology is correct,



the best current measurements indicate that dark energy contributes 68.3% of the total energy in the present-day observable universe. The mass–energy of dark matter and ordinary (baryonic) matter contribute 26.8% and 4.9%, respectively, and other components such as neutrinos and photons contribute a very small amount.


en.wikipedia.org...

If you have to make stuff up to account for 68% then maybe we shouldn't assume that the model is correct.


Wait, I forgot to include the equally fictional Dark Matter. Make that 95.1% fantasy then.


edit on 1/31/2017 by AttentionGrabber because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 10:01 AM
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Parallel worlds bumping into each other... solved!



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

And my point was that you were posting this as if it was proven to be true which it isn't. I think you should prove that your theory is correct.



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 10:35 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

HAH! I was proved wrong with my assumptions !!!



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: AttentionGrabber
The "current measurements" of vacuum energy as "too low" may of course be wrong. But it doesn't disprove the idea that empty space has the tendency to expand. And the discovery that out galaxy is pushed away from a super-void adds more proof to that idea.



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: wildespace




And the discovery that out galaxy is pushed away from a super-void adds more proof to that idea.


What discovery? What proof? Show me.



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: AttentionGrabber
a reply to: wildespace




And the discovery that out galaxy is pushed away from a super-void adds more proof to that idea.


What discovery? What proof? Show me.

www.nature.com...



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

There is no discovery and no proof, just a speculative theory mostly based on earlier assumed models.They themselves say that this region of space in which this repeller is supposed to be located has not been studied by redshift surveys, in other words there is nothing that proves this.



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: AttentionGrabber
a reply to: wildespace

There is no discovery and no proof, just a speculative theory mostly based on earlier assumed models.They themselves say that this region of space in which this repeller is supposed to be located has not been studied by redshift surveys, in other words there is nothing that proves this.

And yet the article makes references to other papers that show that underdense regions push as much as overdensities attract. The article then shows that "when describing the gravitational dynamics in co-moving coordinates, by which the expansion of the Universe is factored out, underdensities repel and overdensities attract" and points to to the region of space that exerts a pushing force on our galaxy.



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

I am not going to pretend that I understand what all these papers are saying, I understand the concept but not the methods so I really can't judge if these arguments are valid or not, and I don't think you can either. It all sounds like theory and speculation to me.

The main things I got from the article is that it did the Kessel run in under a few parsecs and that they used a Wiener filter......they should've called the whole thing the Pussy Repeller.

But like I said they still have to prove their theory and they are saying this themselves.
edit on 1/31/2017 by AttentionGrabber because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 04:45 PM
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"the Milky Way is also being pushed from behind – most probably by a huge region of space almost completely empty of galaxies"

Can someone please explain how a huge region of emptiness is pushing our galaxy, how can "nothing" push something so massive as our galaxy???

And to go a little deeper, what is pushing the “dipole repeller”..?



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 05:20 PM
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originally posted by: DEANORULES24
a reply to: 727Sky

Could it be the exit of a black hole ?


Since I have never been to one, "YOU GOT ME" but every attractor it would seem, needs a pusher to speed things up; at least in this scenario it appears to be so .



posted on Jan, 31 2017 @ 10:58 PM
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originally posted by: Redback
"the Milky Way is also being pushed from behind – most probably by a huge region of space almost completely empty of galaxies"

Can someone please explain how a huge region of emptiness is pushing our galaxy, how can "nothing" push something so massive as our galaxy???

And to go a little deeper, what is pushing the “dipole repeller”..?

Some of it is explained (or at least theorised) in my post earlier: www.abovetopsecret.com...

In other words, due to the Uncertainty Principle, empty space always has some energy, which manifests in virtual particles popping in and out of existence. This creates a slight pushing force, which causes the expansion of the fabric of spacetime and pushes on the matter.



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