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How Far.....?

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posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 04:58 AM
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The Voyager missions have been long gone now,i just wondered is there any idea how far away they are? are they still relaying theyre signals?

I've tried to search,but could only get the info on the actually purpose they were sent out for




posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 05:19 AM
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They are .ing out of the solar system. Voyager 1 is 14 billion kilometers (94 AU) from the Sun, Voyager 2 is 11 billion kilometers. They are both still sending data and have just surpassed 10,000 days of operation. Voyager 1 is now the furthest human-made object from the Sun.

Take a look at voyager.jpl.nasa.gov...

[edit on 30-1-2005 by nibiru]



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 10:52 AM
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14 Billion km? Now that IS a long way away!!

How long is 10,000 days in years?



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 11:03 AM
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According to Google 10 000 days = 27.3790926 years

Voyager 1 and 2 were lauched two weeks apart in the summer of 1977 so 27 and a half years ago. Nasa say they expect them to continue sending data until 2020. So far they have received 80 thousand images and more than 5 trillion bits of data from them



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by nibiru
According to Google 10 000 days = 27.3790926 years


Cool, thanks for that, amazing isnt it?



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 12:02 PM
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They are still alive due to the 1960s technology utilizing solid state electronics.



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 12:22 PM
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E_T

posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 02:12 PM
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Originally posted by IntelRetard
They are still alive due to the 1960s technology utilizing solid state electronics.
It's more about power source than electronics... Pioneers run out of power.

Galileo probe took many times more radiation than it was designed to withstand... while flying many times through area with propably one of the biggest radiation density in solar system.


We only planned to do one close flyby by Io — one day would give you 4,000 times the lethal dose of radiation, which is not very good for a spacecraft or electronics.
www.agiweb.org...

And electronics are radiation hardened and tested throughly before "qualifying" for use in probes. (that's one of the reasons why they don't use very new technology, all this takes time)



posted on Jan, 30 2005 @ 07:13 PM
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I also rememebr reading not too long ago,that the voyagers should be farther out than they are.meaning,something is ever so slightly dragging on them,and they werent sure what it was.if i can find the link i'll post it.

rgrace.org...

[edit on 30-1-2005 by Samhain]



posted on May, 25 2005 @ 01:42 AM
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Go Voyager Go!
Voyager is entering the final lap on its race to the edge of interstellar space, as it begins exploring the solar system's final frontier.





"The consensus of the team now is that Voyager 1, at 8.7 billion miles [14 billion kilometers] from the sun, has at last entered the heliosheath, the region beyond the termination shock," said the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's John Richardson, principal investigator of the Voyager plasma science investigation.

When the solar wind meets interstellar gas, a teardrop-shaped shock wave develops as it is slowed dramatically from an average speed of up to 1.5 million mph (700 kilometers per second). The solar wind, made of charged particles constantly streaming from the sun, becomes denser and hotter at that point.



Voyager 1 has sent back measurements of a stronger magnetic field at its current location. That indicates the solar wind speed has decreased, scientists said. The magnetic field does not gain overall strength, but it becomes more dense and so stronger at any given location.

The magnetic field in November 2003 had increased in strength 1.7 times compared with previous levels. In December 2004 it jumped another factor of 2.5 and has remained at this higher level until now.

"Voyager's observations over the past few years show that the termination shock is far more complicated than anyone thought," said NASA scientist Eric Christian.



The leading edge of the solar system, as it orbits the Milky Way, is called the bow shock. It resembles the ripples of water raised by the bow of a boat. Voyager 1 still has years to go before it crosses the bow shock.


Source

A one-way mission that keeps going & going & going. Voyager 1 is a testimony to the human spirit, gallantly forging on into regions unknown.

Awesome Simulation Below:
www.nasa.gov...





[edit on 25-5-2005 by Vajrayana]



posted on May, 25 2005 @ 06:22 AM
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Originally posted by Vajrayana




Voyager 1 still has years to go before it crosses the bow shock.


[edit on 25-5-2005 by Vajrayana]


Now, that's food for thought.

When i first seen your picture
I immediately saw/ equated the graphic resembled a living 'cell'

*the cell nucleus might be the spheroid identified 'Termination Shock'
*the cell membrane might be the larger casing called 'Heliosheath'
*the 'cell' organism would equate with the intrinstic unit called a 'Heliosphere'

~~~~~~~~
of course Indian/Vedic/ philosophies long ago made this connection
~~~~~~~~

as far as the ? post by

Sanhain ...meaning, something is ever so slightly dragging on them, and they werent sure what it was. ...


good, quick, informative response Vajrayana
but if your reply was not intended as an answer to a question, then,
its really interesting how the dialogues and interplays mesh so well,,,
In-ter-est-ing ....



posted on May, 25 2005 @ 02:40 PM
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That's a very good pic, it means the Voyager probes are just about out of the Solar System. We can learn alot about the stuff outside...



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