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Nestle ‘Reinvents’ Sugar, Set To Hit Shelves Next Year

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posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: Bedlam

So, no added molecules at all, for sure?????
How do they tinker with the traditional sugar molecule?

I get your explanation as to how it works....but more curious as to how they make the change?
A chemical reaction??


Their description of it is that it's a hollow sphere of stock sugar molecules, instead of the usual dense cube. They had a photo, it wasn't all that enlightening so I didn't bother posting it.

They had no explanation as to how they made little balls out of it. I spent maybe 30 mins searching Nestle's pending patent apps, as they said it was applied for but not yet granted. There were nearly 800, and whilst some of the titles were pretty clear others were "method" or the like.

However, one article did have the 'because only the parts that dissolve by the time it slides past yer toong actually count' explanation, which actually makes sense. It doesn't much matter if it's all sugary in your tummy.




posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I'll be interested in knowing how they do it, when they decide to fess up


Also, I'm not remembering this.....what happens when you eat something sweet?
Your mouth tastes it and sends signals to the brain?
Or......?
What decides satiety?



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

I'll be interested in knowing how they do it,
You're not the only one. It could be worth a lot of money. Or it could be a gimmick.

In any case, right now they seem to be the only ones with something marketable.


edit on 1/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: Phage

How they do it will have a lot to do with whether I'll even buy it once.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Well too bad for you then.

They aren't telling.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 10:17 PM
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Ahh Nestle, the same folks who want to corner the market on WATER...

Wonderful folks there, nothing nefarious going on from that entity...



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 12:33 AM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: ColaTesla

And the food pyramid from the 1970's was all wrong. Turns out fat is good wheat is bad and rice and potatoes suck too. Who knew?


Those food pyramids were way off.

I remember the ones in my school which were promoting pizza because it had grains, fruit, meat, and cheese, all in one item.



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: Aazadan
Ketchup is a vegetable.
Really.
It is.

Look it up.

edit on 1/3/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 01:10 AM
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I don't think I would trust anything that came out of their mouths. Food is becoming fake, what next fake air and water GMO particles?



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: Bedlam

I'll be interested in knowing how they do it, when they decide to fess up


Also, I'm not remembering this.....what happens when you eat something sweet?
Your mouth tastes it and sends signals to the brain?
Or......?
What decides satiety?


The sweet taste in your mouth will cause most people to secrete insulin. That'll drop your blood sugar (usually) and make you hungry. It's a problem with artificial sweeteners as well.



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Aahhhhh...that's it!!!
I can attest to that....sugar-free gum does that to me.
A feeling of hunger...but not hunger pains. And mostly a craving for carbs.
It sucks.

Soooooooooooo....if this new "sugar" is meant to be sweeter in the mouth....will it cause the same insulin/hunger issues....more so than regular sugar?



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

It's a way to make candy more intensely sweet, if you wanted to do that.

You could get people to eat more of it. While thinking it was "better" for them.



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 12:59 PM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: seasonal

It is, but at the moment all we can determine is that nestle have turned a solid sugar 'rock' into a hollow shell. How? No idea, but it could be as simple as adding more hydrogen or oxygen atoms...it might be that simple.


That doesn't necessarily mean it will turn out to be safe, though--after all, trans fats have simply had some hydrogen atoms added too. Of course that doesn't mean it won't, either...but I can't think of a single instance when messing around with food in the lab made it safer or healthier. It's usually just the opposite.



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 01:07 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: Bedlam

I'll be interested in knowing how they do it, when they decide to fess up


Also, I'm not remembering this.....what happens when you eat something sweet?
Your mouth tastes it and sends signals to the brain?
Or......?
What decides satiety?

Your blood glucose level. When your blood sugar reaches a certain level, that prompts your body to release the hormone that tells your brain you're full. That's why it's so easy for people to overeat things with artificial sweeteners or fructose (which is metabolized in your liver and doesn't raise your blood sugar.)



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe




Also, if I want something less sweet when I bake and cook....I just add less sugar!!!!!!! Nope, not trusting this new product. Sounds like Frankenfoods to me.


Ditto.

Why these food companies don't just switch to a natural product like Stevia i've no idea.

Grown en-masse, and being as much as 100x sweeter than sugar, and a relatively easy to grow leafy shrub, it's a no-brainer.

Perhaps it's because they can't patent Stevia...



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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originally posted by: MysterX

Ditto.

Why these food companies don't just switch to a natural product like Stevia i've no idea.


Stevia tastes nasty and doesn't do well in candy or pastry. But other than that, who knows?



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Mostly it is because too much is used. And, not getting pure stevia...without binders and fillers.
Mixing it with some xylitol helps a lot.



posted on Jan, 3 2017 @ 04:12 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Aazadan
Ketchup is a vegetable.
Really.
It is.

Look it up.


I remember that. Our school meals were a burger and fries, complete with ketchup to get in out vegetable servings. Right next to the pizza slice food pyramid posters (sponsored by Pizza Hut) hanging on the walls were posters telling us that if we didn't eat our greens we could still get our vegetable servings by eating a bunch of ketchup packets.
edit on 3-1-2017 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)




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