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Nestle ‘Reinvents’ Sugar, Set To Hit Shelves Next Year

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posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: DaCook

Soylent green is pretty tasty.




posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 08:10 PM
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originally posted by: DaCook

originally posted by: ColaTesla
Usually these fake sugars turn out to be worse for you the the good old fashioned full fat version


Someone gets it. On top of that, we generally eat to a point of satisfaction, so you eat 40% more? Mother Nature usually wins in the end. Look at what the society of Internal Medicine is advising people regarding vitamins. Just eat real food. It is all you need, eat it balanced, and don't overeat. I'm calling BS on this one. Ever find anything artificial that tasted good and was healthy?

Denny


I agree with you, save for one thing. It should be noted that they're talking about average, healthy persons with regard to supplements. There are a great number of disease processes which directly affect the body's ability to process key nutrients, and supplements are absolutely required for such a body to survive. Healthy people, however, should not require additional supplements. They simply need to eat quality foods and cook them properly so that the nutritional benefit is complete.



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: DaCook



Ever find anything artificial that tasted good and was healthy?


Define artificial?

Nearly everything we eat has been modified by humans at some point in time, thus artificial.



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

True but to be fair, picking the best pickle and saving seeds or crossing different chickens to get desired qualities is different than what we are talking about.



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 08:27 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

It is, but at the moment all we can determine is that nestle have turned a solid sugar 'rock' into a hollow shell. How? No idea, but it could be as simple as adding more hydrogen or oxygen atoms...it might be that simple.



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 08:40 PM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

True, it could.



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

No, I don't know that for sure....but then neither do those who are saying they didn't change it.
Seems to me if it cannot be used in liquids....a change had to have been made.

To use your example, cane sugar and fructose both melt in liquids.
Right?

We'll see what they end up calling it after their patents get approved.
The sugar molecule was altered to make Splenda.....and remove the calories....it's no longer sugar either.



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 10:14 PM
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Reformulating food has so far gone historically wrong nutritionally speaking. Not that sugar is particularly nutritionally dense to begin with, but is good for necessary short bursts of energy, used sparingly. Given the information so far I can't see this being any different except for the faster burst due to the increased oral absorption. Not really seeing an upside to it except maybe for diabetics in crisis, altho they already have products for that.

Will it be metabolized the same if it's solely absorbed orally as opposed to the normal processes?

If not then what are the side effects? Or I should ask what could they be since I honestly don't know?

Without more information the example used so far that they just reshaped the original sugar molecule is still just speculation since Nestle is being cagy about it yet.

Plus I agree this isn't "just cause it's Nestle" any company reworking basic food molecules should be scrutinized as moving further and further from food in it's natural states hasn't served us well as consumers.



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: Caver78

will this affect our teeth???? more cavities...less cavities???? who knows....watch for more info to come out on this....

sucralose....with the changed sugar molecule....that stuff gives me headaches so I avoid it



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

not going to lie, I like aspartame, especially in diet mountain dew. Prolly the only person. I hate that new fake sugar they added to diet pepsi.



posted on Jan, 1 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: research100

Of course it will. But sadly it will be very difficult to prove.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:58 AM
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Hmm...reading up on it..sounds good.
I see you cant make soda out of it, but I wonder if you can add a couple scoops to tea..or if it will just break down too quickly for even that.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 05:06 AM
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originally posted by: testingtesting
a reply to: DaCook

Soylent green is pretty tasty.


Let's call it Soylent Sugar.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 06:35 AM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe

Also, if I want something less sweet when I bake and cook....I just add less sugar!!!!!!!
Nope, not trusting this new product. Sounds like Frankenfoods to me.



I hear you but I think the point is this tastes sweeter than normal sugar so you'll use lest but it will.taste as sweet.

Personally I don't like the idea of it either, they just can't seem to get sugar substitutes right. Seeetners taste horrible, then there's the whole will it/won't it issue with Aspartame.

I asked a friend to pick up a bag of sugar for me when her and her hubby went shopping and she brought back this, as it's what they use. Put it in my coffee and it was bogging. Put it in my tea and it was minging. Put it on my cereal and it was bloody awful. The next place I put it was in the bin. It might be OK in baking but I don't do that often.

Oh another reason I don't like the idea of this is, it's Nestlé!!!



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 11:48 AM
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Nestle ey?
Im positive they made the 'sugar lite' out of virgins blood, or orphans tears.
Evil b@$!@&)s!!!



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

And ruined English chocolate forever.

Nestle are monsters, another big corporation ready to devour the free market and destroy any that dissent with them.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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From photos, it looks like they took "traditional" sugar crystals which are dense cubes and made hollow spheres out of it.

The intent being, when hydrated in your mouth, they 'go off' and disperse into your taste buds almost instantly. This gives you the sensation of sweetness. A cubic sugar crystal is out of your mouth and down the hatch before it totally dissolves, dumping sugar into your gut that never contributed to 'sweetness' in your mouth.

So they're sort of getting rid of the dead weight non-gustatory sugar. Which is no biggie.

Now, why won't this work in drinks - because the sugar will dissolve in water. You'd have to do this in a high-fat low-water sort of food, and candy is going to be it. Drinks or pastries will negate the structural improvement, because either the crystalline or spherical form of the sugar is going to vanish into the water as a solute.

Tried to find the patent that describes how they're getting that shape, but it's a beeyotch searching the pre-issue database, you can have a title like "method" and that's sufficient for the application database engine. And Nestle has about 800 patents in the pipeline.



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: jellyrev
a reply to: seasonal

not going to lie, I like aspartame, especially in diet mountain dew. Prolly the only person. I hate that new fake sugar they added to diet pepsi.


my room mate was addicted to diet pepsi...then they took out the aspertame and put in sucralose, he had to swich to diet coke........it is so addicting...pepsi just released the old formula in cans, roomie was happy! so ADDICTING
edit on 2-1-2017 by research100 because: dang spelling

edit on 2-1-2017 by research100 because: dang spelling



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

So, no added molecules at all, for sure?????
How do they tinker with the traditional sugar molecule?

I get your explanation as to how it works....but more curious as to how they make the change?
A chemical reaction??



posted on Jan, 2 2017 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: djz3ro

I had a heck of a time trying to find out with was in Half Spoon...and came up with this

Sugar with Aspartame and Acesulfame-K Based Table Top Sweeteners.

groceries.morrisons.com...
I'd say you were wise to pitch it!!!!!




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