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Autism Ears

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posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 05:16 PM
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Introduction

New years eve is approaching and people are shooting their celebrated fireworks everywhere.
Im still doing studies in the realm of neuroscience and psychology, and today something caught my eye, and it was about Autism and fireworks and what happens during this time of year to those with autism ears.
The imprinting that follows, or using a psychological statement called " trauma ". Does it trigger something?
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Autism spectrum disorder

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the name for a group of developmental disorders. ASD includes a wide range, “a spectrum,” of symptoms, skills, and levels of disability.

People with ASD often have these characteristics:

-Ongoing social problems that include difficulty communicating and interacting with others
-Repetitive behaviors as well as limited interests or activities
-Symptoms that typically are recognized in the first two years of life
-Symptoms that hurt the individual’s ability to function socially, at school or work, or other areas of life
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Autism Ears

Many children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder have trouble regulating the sensory information that bombards them on a daily basis. Children on the autism spectrum may be overly sensitive or under-responsive to sounds and they may have difficulty interpreting the sensory information their brain receives. This leaves many parents at a loss about what to do for their child to help him or her live in a loud world without anxiety and fear.

Every single human being processes sensory input differently – in that way we are all the same. But when sensitivity to noise becomes an obstacle to a person’s typical daily functioning, development, social life and behavior, it is known as a sensory processing disorder. Many children with ‘Autism ears’ are over-responsive to noise and experience heightened reactions to sudden snaps, crackles or pops, especially fireworks.
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Conclusion

I believe its a sensitory overload in the brain of those with autism spectrum.

Source

Autism Spectrum Disorder
Autism Ears
Autism Spectrum - Wikipedia
edit on 20161230 by tikbalang because: image




posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 05:41 PM
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Autism isn't a disorder. It's a way people are. People are different, they're not all the same. People have different strengths, weaknesses, aptitudes and interests. But since we're so disconnected from our true selves and since we are so hell bent on making sure that everyone is the exact same as everyone else we make sure to ostracize anyone that is different.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

I'm fortunate to have a child with Asperger's who is not affect by noise to the point of making him freak out or melt down, but it does sometimes bother him in a relatively mild way. But, the noise of a crowded room where he can't focus on a particular source of the overwhelming noise has a bigger affect on his ability to function "normally" in that setting, especially in cars where multiple people are talking. I also think that this is a reason why he tends to need to be told more than once to do something before it actually registers in his brain--I think that he tunes it out the first (couple?) times it's told to him until he's willing/able to give the verbal comment his undivided attention.

I agree that it's a sensory overload thing, for sure, and same actually can seemingly be said about food textures and clothing as well.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: Spacespider
Autism isn't a disorder. It's a way people are. People are different, they're not all the same. People have different strengths, weaknesses, aptitudes and interests. But since we're so disconnected from our true selves and since we are so hell bent on making sure that everyone is the exact same as everyone else we make sure to ostracize anyone that is different.


Saying its autism spectrum does not ostracize anyone, what it DOES is makes people aware that certain people with this diagnosis handle things differently than most other people, thats not a BAD thing, but its better that people are aware so that they can interface in a way that is most beneficial to those with Autism or Aspergers.

I worked for many years with children who had both, and to some were much more severe in symptoms, there are basic things that hold true with all of them.

Again its not a BAD thing, but they are different, wonderfully so, and approaches have to be different.

Attempting to dismiss this or demonize the "label" doesnt help them at all, assuming they can and should be treated in some circumstances like anyone else can be traumatizing for them because they process many things at a much higher level.

I think you need to not be so offended and actually look at whats being presented as coming from a position of help



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: Spacespider

Based on facts, it is considered a disorder..
If you cant relate to anything, how will you function in society? Even in a primitive tribal environment?
It is different even considered in primitive standards,,



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 05:54 PM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

I have a question;" Could you get them to relate? "



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 05:56 PM
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a reply to: Spacespider

While you're seeing this with nice eyes, Autism IS a disorder if you use the accepted medical definition of the word:

disorder
/dis·or·der/ (dis-or´der)
a derangement or abnormality of function

When using this definition, it implies that there is a normalized baseline of certain functions of the human brain (and this does exist), and Autism does present itself as an abnormal functioning of certain parts of the brain, as proven in brain scans, clinical observation, and the like.

My son is the perfect way that he should be, but that doesn't mean that he wasn't born with (or didn't develop...we still don't know) a clinically diagnosed disorder.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang



Based on facts, it is considered a disorder.. If you cant relate to anything, how will you function in society? Even in a primitive tribal environment? It is different even considered in primitive standards,,

I think they do relate, just not in a comfy way that you are used too is all. :-)

Shall we take a look at your signature ?



For with the same judgment you pronounce you will be judged; and with the measure you use it will be measured to you.


leolady



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:01 PM
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originally posted by: tikbalang
a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

I have a question;" Could you get them to relate? "



Thats a very broad question my friend.....

They relate on many levels just like everyone else, some things not so much for the simple fact that, again they dont process the same as others....

Its like asking someone who is blind from birth if they like the color red, colors arent a thing for them so they couldnt relate...



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

I got a research paper that gave some insight, our modern environment and way of life is one of the causes that triggers ASD..
And the world as they perceive it can be confusing and scary, triggering a genetic imprinting of survival instincts, see it like this;" They learn how to survive everyday cause they are afraid, adapting."



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: leolady

Oooh, now i get that one!



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

Could you share you experiences a bit more?

Pro - cons, etc?

Failures, success etc.?



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:12 PM
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My personal experience that you may take however you choose :
My child diagnosed with ASD is always screaming. I have to tell him repeatedly to lower his voice. We try library voice or mom has a migraine voice..



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

By the way... I love Fireworks


leolady



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:14 PM
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originally posted by: tikbalang
a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

Could you share you experiences a bit more?

Pro - cons, etc?

Failures, success etc.?


I wouldnt say there were any CONS so to speak.

There are varying degrees of it, some function highly in most other areas, some dont communicate verbally at all it just depends on the degree...

All of them were sensitive to stimuli, whether it was sounds, groups of people, loud noises, physical touch etc etc.....
They did however ALL love music, and quite a few that i worked with loved to play instruments, it soothes the mind and focuses many of them.

Disciplining for parents is something that has to be approached quite differently as well as you can imagine, like all children they get into trouble, but the approach to the discipline in many cases has to be modified...

Going back to physical touch , this one varried quite a bit, while about half of the kids that I worked with didnt like it, the other half did, and holding them close was one of the quickest and easiest ways to calm an outburst....

I kind of miss that line of work honestly, and I commend families with severe cases , its hard , and it does take a toll on you, heartbreaking many times. Which is why I moved on .



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:17 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey

I agree that it's a sensory overload thing, for sure, and same actually can seemingly be said about food textures and clothing as well.


Mine outgrew the noise sensory overload - - and hair sensitivity. He freaked at the air dryers in restrooms. Always fun to have a toddler scream because you wash his hair.

Now its about finding the balance between his world and the rest of the world where he has to follow orders and rules.

It took a full hour today to get through one page of math because he doesn't like math. Trying to get him to understand if you focus and stay focused til something is done, then you are free.

Yes, a lot of kids are like this, but its just more so with Autism Spectrum. He's a creative story teller and he never stopped talking through the whole hour of math. It's like taking a magic carpet ride with a calculator that doesn't want to function.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

Medication?



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: Annee




Trying to get him to understand if you focus and stay focused til something is done, then you are free.


You do not understand.

It is not his will power lacking, nor is it a lack of understanding.

You have to accept that he can't.

There are various things you can try. He may enjoy math games, but just short bursts.

See if he is willing to do a single problem if he walks passed the open book.

Ask him a question verbally.

Just because you can't see how one could do it that way, doesn't mean he can't.

P



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:44 PM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: Annee




Trying to get him to understand if you focus and stay focused til something is done, then you are free.


You do not understand.

It is not his will power lacking, nor is it a lack of understanding.


I understand perfectly.

He has to live in this world. He can be a success or a failure.


You have to accept that he can't.


NO, I don't. And neither does he.


There are various things you can try. He may enjoy math games, but just short bursts.


NO. There are various things I and he can DO. Not try, DO.


See if he is willing to do a single problem if he walks passed the open book.


Ask him? Ask him what he's willing to do? Oh, hell NO! That is NOT how the world works.

This kid taught himself phonetics from computer programs at age 3.

He would manipulate someone like you so fast you wouldn't know what happened.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: Annee

I was hoping for a better response to be honest. If you are not willing to learn, why should he?

P



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