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Q and A with a 100 Year Old Man

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posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:30 PM
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I was asked to do a Q and A this morning over at the 'what did you look like when you were younger' thread. Here's my picture from there:



And an explanation from my Introduction post:



Figured it was high time we introduced ourselves. As explained in the thread 'what does your avatar name mean' - 'We' are two people. One of us will be 101 years old soon enough, the other is a companion, secretary and writer in their own right. The older of us became interested in UFOs during WWII after some exposure to Foo Fighter discussions, being present in Long Beach during the Battle of LA, and typing up some strange paperwork in the Army that is probably still under lock and key somewhere; and also in Ancient Egypt (thus the avatar, Ka is life force which we'll both be needing more of, soon enough...); it's my opinion that there's no way those pyramids were built by a known human race, nor as recently as commonly reported. Thus the interest in all things ATS. Your Isaac Koi has been a fascinating research source (thank you for all your work!) and we are just starting to scratch the surface. I'm legally blind and can't drive anymore, and the 'voice' you hear here will be a mix of the two of us depending on the topic.


The following will be typed by an assistant just to speed things up. SC can speed type but the eyes aren't what they used to be.

I was born in 1915 in a small town near Des Moines, Iowa. My father was a 'banker's banker' and we moved from town to town as he was reassigned to try to keep the banks from failing during the Depression. His brother, my uncle, 'lied like crazy' to get into WWI and was a scout over German lines flying a bi-wing. (The Germans and Allied started by waving at one another when their planes would pass, then someone started shooting pistols at each other, then they graduated to rifles (!) and finally machine guns. The Germans were the first to figure out how to time the machine gun fire to shoot through the propeller without damaging it - good German engineering!

When he got back in 1919 or so, 'gotta have a plane, gotta have a plane' - and he and two friends saved up to buy a war surplus Jennie in a crate, $250; a lot of money back then. I learned how to put that plane together, take it apart and put it back again when I was barely old enough to reach it.

Jenny

Fast forward a few years and I moved to Longbeach, CA and got a job assembling B-17 for Douglas Aircraft. I was in Longbeach during the 'Battle of LA' but didn't see much - the searchlights were so bright it just looked like a balloon or something, and after the shrapnel started falling, we all went back indoors; that morning there was a lot of damage and the palm trees in the neighborhood were all shredded. Different explanations for 'what was that thing?' were bandied about but they were a mix of 'it was a misidentified one of ours' and 'the Japanese have made it to the mainland'. No one ever explained why all those shells didn't bring it down.

I was drafted during the early part of 1945, went to basic training (they sent me to learn to drive a tank! A tank! When I could fly and repair anything on a plane!) Being an Iowa farmboy, I had no trouble hitting the target dead on during rifle training but at one point overheard my instructor telling some bigshots he'd brought over 'sniper training' and from then on, I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn! Had fun hitting the uprights that held the targets, though! I think I got the guy in trouble because he had told them he had a good one for sniper training. I didn't want to do that.

We loaded up in California (LA?) and were on a ship of about 10,000 men, headed towards Australia or the Midway Islands. Nobody told us nuthin'. It was late July, 1945. Chicken and coffee for breakfast, coffee and chicken for dinner...

After a couple days, in the middle of the night I felt the ship turn north and to the right... 'uh oh, only thing that way was Japan!' Still, no one told us anything. It turned out we landed 1 and a half days after the verbal surrender and mere days after the bombs had been dropped.

We disembarked with orders 'not to start anything' and with rifles and soft hats (not helmets) but without bayonets or even one bullet for each man! We were as scared as the Japanese people were, but turned out we had no trouble at all. They were glad the war was over, and it was almost totally women and children and very old men. The young men were just gone, along with the city of Tokyo. It had been completely firebombed, there was nothing left except frames of bombed out building, a few charred trees, and the financial and entertainment districts (interestingly...). The Ginza was still there and we made use of that on R and R.

Since they found out I was a speed typist, they made me a bit of a Radar O'Riley for the HQ brass. I spent my days typing up reports from both Allied and Japanese officers, detailing all the stuff that happened at the end of the war; most of it was awful and I didn't want to remember it, and was told not to. I had a relatively high security clearance, I think. Some of the reports were about awkward and almost code-like discussions of foo fighters; without outright saying so, the brass were trying to figure out if they were German tech or perhaps our own they hadn't been told about. You could tell they were perplexed but unwilling to go much farther in surmising what they were. During the war, I don't think they had time to think about them.

I made friends with a family there after a teenage girl came up to me on the beach and said, 'What is your name, soldier?' in perfect Midwestern English... and then her Mamasan said hello and invited me back to their house, one of the few that was still intact; we've been pen-palling ever since; I have letters going back to 1946 up to present all saved. Their English and handwriting is far better than mine and I'm now communicating with the great-grandchildren of the original friends.

Once I returned to the States, I entered the printing business (no more need for B-17s) and that's what I retired from, back in 1979 or so. I think I've collected over $250,000 from Uncle Sam in SS money, and I've now been retired longer than I was working



Hobbies: rockhounding in the Southern California and Nevada deserts; I have a huge collection of arrowheads and fossils. Also stamps, coins, Japanese memorabilia, genealogy stuff... I've managed to trace my ancestors back to Scotland in the 1830s or so.

I used to read a lot and work on my original 1930 Model A - still have it. I surrendered my driver's license two years ago due to declining vision, but I lived alone until I was 99. My wife died young, in 1981, so I've been a widow since then.

Okay, that's long enough for starters. Any questions, shoot away.
edit on 4/9/16 by argentus because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian




I've managed to trace my ancestors back to Scotland in the 1830s or so.


That's only 45 years before you were born. Were they your parents or grandparents? For some reason I assumed that family record keeping would have been close to the hearts of your parents generation.
edit on 4-9-2016 by Atsbhct because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

No, I was born in 1915 - 1830 is a lot before then.
Record keeping was lost to some extent when they came over on boats from England.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

Hahaha @ my math skills.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

Hi SC,

Do you have any family to speak of, brothers, sisters, children or Grand children ?

kind regards,

bally



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

I can't think of anything specifically at the moment to ask.

Hopefully someone will come along who can.

My Mother was born in 1921 and I enjoyed her stories about growing up and how different things were for her than they were for me and my children. She had a sister who lived to 103 and another sister who will be 102 on Valentine's day in 2017.

I think I would be interested in anything that you care to share with us about your years and the places that you lived.

I remember Mother saying how blessed we are were compared to the struggles that she and her family had but in some ways she felt she was more blessed.

Have a great day and thank you for offering yourself and your experiences/thoughts to all of us.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:50 PM
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Wow fantastic story thanks for sharing it, I'm from Scotland born and bred were almost like family in a way :-)

How does it feel to be 100 years old?
edit on 4-9-2016 by DarkvsLight29 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:51 PM
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originally posted by: bally001
a reply to: SentientCentenarian

Hi SC,

Do you have any family to speak of, brothers, sisters, children or Grand children ?

kind regards,

bally

I had 4 sisters who all lived to be quite old, one almost 101, the age I am now. My brother was the oldest, 10 years older than me. He 'smoked my share and drank my share' and died around the age of 68 or so. He actually managed to run into two trains when he was employed as a driver - but he hit the walls of the freight train rather than the wheels and didn't even dent the car.

I had two children, a daughter and son during the war. My daughter is now in her 70s and has Alzheimers; my son ended up becoming a college professor and lives several hundred miles north of here. He's retired now too.

I had 3 grandchildren, one died young of cancer and several great grandchildren - I think 6
They live all over the States now and I don't see them frequently.

Thank you for your question



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: DarkvsLight29
Wow fantastic story thanks for sharing it, I'm from Scotland born and bred were almost like family in a way :-)

How does it feel to be 100 years old?


I actually feel pretty good - only my knees hurt some and that's when I overdo. No heart disease at all, never had cancer; I never smoked or drank, except for one beer I didn't like. My brother taught me what not to do!

Otherwise, everything has changed so much! I am learning to navigate this 'magic box' with the help of my companion; I have a magnifier hooked up to the computer and like reading posts here, especially about UFO and Egyptian things, and planes.

I teach a junior year HS history class at the local school - it's amazing interacting with people that young.

I guess the only thing I don't like is that I don't know why I'm still here, and I need to nap a lot. I used to be able to work a 10 hour shift without a problem. Now one or two hours a day is all I can handle.
edit on 4-9-2016 by SentientCentenarian because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:01 PM
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a reply to: TNMockingbird

Yes, the Depression was hard on a lot of people. My father's job was secure and if he wasn't paid in money, he was in chickens or corn. We never went hungry living in Iowa. It was sad though, sometimes. One farm was almost lost because the brothers who owned it didn't have $200 to make the bank note. I think they had a fundraiser for them and saved it. Not living in a city, we were isolated from a lot of the bad stuff.

In the end, though, all the Iowa farmland was bought up by huge conglomerates. I think the Depression enabled that to happen...



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

Awesome post - and interesting life story to boot


So I've got a question if you don't mind? Do you personally feel that time goes by much faster the older you get? I've noticed it over the last 10 years or so. For example as a kid summer holidays being just 6 weeks lasted forever - whereas now 6 weeks feels like a heartbeat.

Does that stop being the case, or does it continue to feel like it speeds up?

Thanks again for such an interesting post



edit on 4-9-2016 by youcanttellthepeople because: Grammar



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:14 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

Thank you for this, you really have an amazing story. I felt this was waiting to come out of you!!!
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

Thank you for your response.

My Mother's family were farmers in NC. Tough times all around then.


Fast forward a few years and I moved to Longbeach, CA and got a job assembling B-17 for Douglas Aircraft. I was in Longbeach during the 'Battle of LA' but didn't see much - the searchlights were so bright it just looked like a balloon or something, and after the shrapnel started falling, we all went back indoors; that morning there was a lot of damage and the palm trees in the neighborhood were all shredded. Different explanations for 'what was that thing?' were bandied about but they were a mix of 'it was a misidentified one of ours' and 'the Japs have made it to the mainland'. No one ever explained why all those shells didn't bring it down.

Regarding this above, what is your feeling on it? Do you think it was a weather balloon and itchy 'trigger' fingers?



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: youcanttellthepeople
a reply to: SentientCentenarian

Awesome post - and interesting life story to boot


So I've got a question if you don't mind? Do you personally feel that time goes by much faster the older you get?

Thanks again for such an interesting post




Oh BOY, does it! I long ago stopped paying attention to what day of the week it is unless I have an appointment.

Now, I'm lucky to remember what month it is!



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:16 PM
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Hi there,

I'm 33 yrs old and an artist. I don't know why you might need to know that but, I am really enjoying this thread and wanted to tell you. I love you.

So I have some questions.

Do you believe in God? If so, which one(s)... and do you have any cool paranormal/supernatural stories to share? I'd like those.

And do you believe in Aliens? Have you ever seen a UFO? Please share, lol.

What are your thoughts on the advancement of technology?

And... I thank you again for taking the time to share with us. It's been amazing so far. I may have more questions later.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: SentientCentenarian

originally posted by: DarkvsLight29
Wow fantastic story thanks for sharing it, I'm from Scotland born and bred were almost like family in a way :-)

How does it feel to be 100 years old?[/quote

I actually feel pretty good - only my knees hurt some and that's when I overdo. No heart disease at all, never had cancer; I never smoked or drank, except for one beer I didn't like. My brother taught me what not to do!

Otherwise, everything has changed so much! I am learning to navigate this 'magic box' with the help of my companion; I have a magnifier hooked up to the computer and like reading posts here, especially about UFO and Egyptian things, and planes.

I teach a junior year HS history class at the local school - it's amazing interacting with people that young.

I guess the only thing I don't like is that I don't know why I'm still here, and I need to nap a lot. I used to be able to work a 10 hour shift without a problem. Now one or two hours a day is all I can handle.


That doesn't sound so bad, i had to ask cause hopefully i'll reach that age,, although that's 70 years from now lol,, and in that time my world will change as it did for you.

How have you adjusted to all the new city buildings and technology that has changed over the last 100 years?

Just noticed that another poster asked the same question about the advancement of technology over your time,, would be brilliant to know your thoughts on it.
edit on 4-9-2016 by DarkvsLight29 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

I'm not as old as you nor do I think I'll ever be as old as you are (life choices).

But I am older than many. Just a boomer with a twisted sense of humor.

My question is this; did you get smarter as you aged?



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:23 PM
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originally posted by: TNMockingbird
a reply to: SentientCentenarian

Thank you for your response.

My Mother's family were farmers in NC. Tough times all around then.


Fast forward a few years and I moved to Longbeach, CA and got a job assembling B-17 for Douglas Aircraft. I was in Longbeach during the 'Battle of LA' but didn't see much - the searchlights were so bright it just looked like a balloon or something, and after the shrapnel started falling, we all went back indoors; that morning there was a lot of damage and the palm trees in the neighborhood were all shredded. Different explanations for 'what was that thing?' were bandied about but they were a mix of 'it was a misidentified one of ours' and 'the Japs have made it to the mainland'. No one ever explained why all those shells didn't bring it down.


Regarding this above, what is your feeling on it? Do you think it was a weather balloon and itchy 'trigger' fingers?



No, I thought (think now anyway) that it was a UFO, but at the time that was unthinkable, more or less.

It just floated away, like a balloon, quite leisurely, as reported in the papers at the time. But we shelled the heck out of it! No balloon could have survived that barrage. It was way too big for a weather balloon, and much lower than one would have been. If I remember correctly, it was tracked moving up the whole coastline. A weather balloon goes straight up almost to the stratosphere, pops and falls back down again. There wasn't any particular wind that night, either.



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

That is amazing you still have a original Ford Model A!



posted on Sep, 4 2016 @ 04:27 PM
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a reply to: SentientCentenarian

I love your thread thankyou. I find it utterly fascinating reading your stories. You remember things that many of us have little knowledge of apart from reading about certain events in history books but listening to your stories real time is 1000 times better than that! May I ask how you came across ATS?

I'm thrilled that you're here and hope you don't mind if I ask you more questions in time, about your experiences from past decades when, in my humble opinion, were better in many incidences than they are now.

Thankyou again it is an honor!



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