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What is "goodness?"

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posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 10:44 AM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH

originally posted by: birdxofxprey


These precepts don't appear to be time indexed, and they are as simultaneous as written text could accommodate (successive verses):

Prov 26:4 “Answer not a fool according to his folly, lest you be like him yourself.”
Prov 26:5 “Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own eyes.”



Judeo-Christian religion doesn't specify the times explicitly.



Then what's the basis for saying that "Religion claims that the two most important things are "timing" and "food". "

If it's one of the most important things, wouldn't it be a bit more explicit?




posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 11:40 AM
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originally posted by: birdxofxprey

originally posted by: AMPTAH

originally posted by: birdxofxprey


These precepts don't appear to be time indexed, and they are as simultaneous as written text could accommodate (successive verses):

Prov 26:4 “Answer not a fool according to his folly, lest you be like him yourself.”
Prov 26:5 “Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own eyes.”



Judeo-Christian religion doesn't specify the times explicitly.



Then what's the basis for saying that "Religion claims that the two most important things are "timing" and "food". "

If it's one of the most important things, wouldn't it be a bit more explicit?


Yes. It is very explicit. But, not everybody knows how to read.

In the Judeo-Christian scriptures, it says so right here:

"This is the law of the house; Upon the top of the mountain the whole limit thereof round about shall be most holy. Behold, this is the law of the house." -- KJV, Ezekiel 43:12

For the average individual, it is easy to see that all the religions practice some rituals based on "calendars", and every religion specifies what food you are allowed to eat. The "food" in this context, are all the things you feed your "six senses". Religion tells you what you can touch, what you can taste, what you listen to, what you can think about, what odors you are to inhale, and what you can look at.

So, "timing" and "food", are the main focus of all these religions.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: Aristotelian1


What is goodness?



It could perhaps be described as the taking of positive action which facilitates the wellbeing, growth or other type of positive development for persons, groups, settlements & states, nations & alliances, all of which exist beyond your own self. Being selfless is key to goodness. Good behaviour begins with doing no harm to any other, and develops into doing positive, nice things for others.

That's kind of the way I see it, giving it only a few moments thought.

Given more time I could probably phrase it more comprehensively, but this is my shoot-from-the-hip answer.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: AMPTAH


So, "timing" and "food", are the main focus of all these religions.


No, those only constitute the trappings, the outer form which identifies the religion.

In the Judeo-Christian tradition, you will find no clearer statement of the focus of the religion than what follows below:



New International Version (NIV)


He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.
And what does the Lord require of you?
To act justly and to love mercy
and to walk humbly with your God.


Micah 6:8

(My emphasis)



Justice, mercy & humility.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 12:19 PM
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originally posted by: FlyInTheOintment
a reply to: AMPTAH

Justice, mercy & humility.



Huh ?

What is justice?

What is mercy?

What is humility?

Do you know these things?



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 12:25 PM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH
Yes. It is very explicit. But, not everybody knows how to read.



Earlier, you said "Judeo-Christian religion doesn't specify the times explicitly."

Now you say it does?

The idea that something could be explicit (but only to those who possess specialized knowledge) is contradictory.
If it requires an inference based on esoteric knowledge, then it's implicit.
Explicit means you don't have to infer it from the text, it's clear.

RE: "For the average individual, it is easy to see that all the religions practice some rituals based on "calendars", and every religion specifies what food you are allowed to eat."

The average person has no knowledge of the majority of the world's 4000+ religions.
You may be correct about a few, but the generalization is unreliable.

RE: "The "food" in this context, are all the things you feed your "six senses". "

It doesn't seem at all explicit that "food" has this meaning attached to it.
But, as you claim all religions do this, perhaps you could give an example of an odor
that Zen Buddhists are obligated to inhale?



edit on 27-6-2016 by birdxofxprey because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 03:25 PM
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originally posted by: birdxofxprey


Earlier, you said "Judeo-Christian religion doesn't specify the times explicitly."

Now you say it does?



It tells us there are cycles of time. Hence the calendar with it's periodic feasts, festivals, and observances.

But, it doesn't explicitly say exactly when one time begins and another time ends. It uses coded verses like,

"... it shall be for a time, times, and an half... " -- KJV, Daniel 12:7

But then 911 occures exactly on new years day on the Christian Orthodox Church, so we know a time just came to an end.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: AMPTAH

Funny you would say that but the reverse is often true. If it weren't so, we would never see altruistic behavior in the animal kingdom. We would also have evolved without sympathy, and the majority of us would display sociopathic behavior, as would animals. If what you say is true, that is.

I believe that your observations are a result of confirmation bias. The natural state of any being is not to be sociopathic. Why? Because it takes less energy. If an animal is sociopathic, or exhibits such behavior it is usually because that animal is sick or wounded.

Man, is more likely to display anti-social behavior, which is learned rather than innate. Why? I'm no sociologist or psychologist, but it seems to all point back to greed.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 05:08 PM
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originally posted by: kelbtalfenek
a reply to: AMPTAH
If an animal is sociopathic, or exhibits such behavior it is usually because that animal is sick or wounded.

Man, is more likely to display anti-social behavior, which is learned rather than innate. Why? I'm no sociologist or psychologist, but it seems to all point back to greed.


But, that's the whole doctrine of religion.

That man is sick.

He is a sinner. He has bad karma. He is plagued by sanskars. He possesses the three poisons: greed, anger, delusion.

Whatever religion you pick, you find that the "times" and the "food" restrictions are there to supposedly help man overcome this sickness.

But, according to every religion, every person is ill.

Some maybe more sick than others, but there are no holy walking around in the flesh.

The flesh itself, is a manifestation of the illness. It's like a sack of potatoes the spirit drags around with it everywhere it goes.

As long as you have a body of flesh, you have the three poisons: greed, anger, delusion.

That's what makes flesh flesh.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 11:57 AM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH

originally posted by: kelbtalfenek
a reply to: AMPTAH
If an animal is sociopathic, or exhibits such behavior it is usually because that animal is sick or wounded.

Man, is more likely to display anti-social behavior, which is learned rather than innate. Why? I'm no sociologist or psychologist, but it seems to all point back to greed.


But, that's the whole doctrine of religion.

That man is sick.

He is a sinner. He has bad karma. He is plagued by sanskars. He possesses the three poisons: greed, anger, delusion.

Whatever religion you pick, you find that the "times" and the "food" restrictions are there to supposedly help man overcome this sickness.

But, according to every religion, every person is ill.

Some maybe more sick than others, but there are no holy walking around in the flesh.

The flesh itself, is a manifestation of the illness. It's like a sack of potatoes the spirit drags around with it everywhere it goes.

As long as you have a body of flesh, you have the three poisons: greed, anger, delusion.

That's what makes flesh flesh.


Not so... all 3 "poisons" are learned, not innate.



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